UK housing market now weaker than Greece’s, global index reveals

first_imgThe struggling UK sales market has propelled the nation ten places down the global house price index list, Knight Frank has revealed, and has been overtaken by a list of countries unknown previously for their perky housing markets.These include Slovenia, Greece, Peru, Iceland, Chile, Romania, Bulgaria, Estonia, Slovakia, Colombia, Hungary and Latvia, all of which have seen more promising house price growth than the UK over the past 12 months.Two years ago the UK’s homes were increasing in price on average by 4.1% per annum, placing the nation at No.35 within the top 55 but since then the UK’s housing market has become increasingly subdued.The latest Knight Frank report reveals that slowing house price increases in the UK have helped the nation slip to 45th place with an annual inflation rate of 1.4%.This places us some way behind even Greece where house prices have increased by 2.4% despite its debt-ridden economy.Spare a thought for Australia. As Purplebricks found out to its cost, the property market there is in freefall and house prices are currently winding down by 5.5% a year, placing Oz last in the Knight Frank list.Slovenian boomThe country with the highest house price growth is Slovenia which is enjoying an incredible boom.Kate Everett-Allen, Partner (left), International Residential Research at Knight Frank says: “Slovenia is home to the world’s fastest rising house prices with average values accelerating 18.2% year-on-year.“Falling unemployment, low interest rates and until recently, limited supply are behind the strong price growth.”  Global House Price Index Kate Everett-Allen knight frank June 14, 2019Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021 Home » News » Housing Market » UK housing market now weaker than Greece’s, global index reveals previous nextHousing MarketUK housing market now weaker than Greece’s, global index revealsKnight Frank’s data reveals that the UK has slipped from 35 to 45 within its global list over the past two years as house price increases have slowed.Nigel Lewis14th June 20190995 Viewslast_img read more

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Fermex gives frozen dough a lift

first_imgFermex (Worcester) supplies a frozen yeast product with characteristics similar to dried and fresh yeasts, but also a number of advantages over both, particularly when used in frozen dough applications. Like dried yeast, it is free-flowing, even at –20°C, is unaffected by oxygen and moisture, so vacuum-packed storage is unnecessary, says the company.Fresh yeast normally has a shelf-life of around four weeks when stored at 4°C and in conventional bakery production works satisfactorily throughout its shelf-life. However, when used in frozen dough, particularly when sugar is present, the effect of the age of the yeast can reduce the long-term storage quality of the frozen dough. This is not the case with Fermex F3 yeast, claims the company. The yeast remains in peak condition throughout its shelf-life in frozen storage. It has the same gassing power of traditional yeast and so is especially useful in ensuring consistency of final product, says Fermex.The shelf-life of frozen dough products is adversely affected if fermentation commences before the freezing process. Fermex F3 yeast contains approximately 75% solids, compared to about 30% solids in fresh, compressed yeast. This reduced moisture content means the onset of fermentation is delayed as Fermex F3 yeast has to absorb water, first.In addition, dough temperature can be kept to a minimum as Fermex F3 is added directly to the mix in frozen form, and does not suffer the “cold shock” that can reduce shelf-life of frozen dough products made with dried yeasts, says the company.The strains of the yeast are also specially selected to ensure optimum stability of fermentation power.last_img read more

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Less than alluring

first_imgMaking a bid to become bakers’ public enemy number one is ageing ex-supermodel (miaow) Cindy Crawford, whose baker-baiting bread abuse was snapped for a photoshoot in the April issue of US women’s magazine Allure. The image of 43-year-old Crawford tearing up a loaf in the mag’s ’anti-ageing issue’ was captioned with: ’White bread may be slang for innocuous, but not for your diet’.The story was picked up by The Daily Mail, which ran the headline: “Want to look like Cindy Crawford? Then ditch bread”. Well, we don’t, but we wish Ms Crawford all the best in her efforts to defy gravity, wrinkles and an ever-decreasing pay packet.last_img read more

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A look inside: Dunster House

first_img Rub it in Stephanie Havens ’14 (from left), Allison Ray ’14, and Bryce Gilfillian ’12 give each other back rubs to get loose before the performance. In character Thomas Wilhoit ’13 (from left), Michael Cherella ’11, and Bridget Haile ’11 in a scene from “Die Fledermaus.” A night at the opera Rosalind Rosalind, played by Bridget Haile ’11, rejects the advances of her baron husband, performed by Ben Nelson ’11. Short on pants Stewart Kramer ’12 irons his pants before going on stage. Drill, baby, drill “Die Fledermaus” cast members Jack Ausick ’13 and Stephanie Havens ’14 work on the set prior to rehearsal. Positively batty Lead actors Ben Nelson ’11 and Bridget Haile ’11 get dramatic in “Die Fledermaus,” or, “The Bat.” Lady in waiting Allison Ray ’14 pauses while Dunster House Opera Society members work with the set. The conductor Matt Aucoin ’12 steps out of the shadows. When Dunster House was built in 1930, the fee for a room was based on its size and location, understandable in light of the fact that Dunster has six floors — and no elevator. Located on the banks of the Charles River next to the Weeks Footbridge, Dunster is recognizable by its crimson and gold dome, and was modeled after a church tower at Oxford. Like other Harvard Houses, Dunster has its traditions, the major ones being the Dunster House Opera, the “Messiah” sing-a-long, and a goat roast in the spring.The Dunster House Opera Society was founded in 1992, and unlike the longer-standing Lowell Opera, it utilizes only undergraduates for its cast, staff, and orchestra. This means that everyone involved pitches in and shares multiple roles, with singers assembling sets shortly before they go onstage to deliver their arias. For many members of the cast, it is their first experience with opera. The society’s goal is to “provide the Harvard community with exposure to opera, as both a valuable art form and an accessible, enjoyable form of entertainment.” As if to underscore this point, performances take place in the Dunster dining room, which each night is quickly transformed from a sea of tables and chairs to a stage. This season’s performance was the operetta “Die Fledermaus” by Johann Strauss II.The camaraderie built on the set by producers, singers, and stagehands working side by side extends throughout the House. Senior Diana Suen said, “Since my first day at Dunster, when I was smothered with hugs from our House mascot, I have never felt for want of a friendly face. The Dunster community is incredibly welcoming, and there is nothing that compares to the bonds formed over intense IM games, late nights in the dining hall slaving over problem sets with friends, delicious study breaks hosted by the masters and resident tutors, and, yes, even the sometimes-too-cozy intimacy of walk-through rooms. Dunster truly feels like my home away from home.” Off the wall Kirby Haugland ’11 faces a wall in the kitchen serving area to avoid distractions. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer Mustachio Michael Cherella ’11 gets by with a little help from his friend Sofia Selowsky ’12. Backbeat Jess Rucinski ’13 keeps the beat of the performance. Break a leg The cast gets amped up pre-performance.last_img read more

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Thinking backward

In the life and work of UCLA’s Carlo Ginzburg, who will deliver Harvard’s Tanner Lectures on Human Values April 15-17, one finds intertwined layers of living history and historical study. Ginzburg was born into a family of no small significance, not least because it included many noteworthy figures in the Italian anti-Fascist resistance. Both of his parents were of Jewish descent. His mother, Natalia (Levi), would recall her experiences as a member of this family in “Lessico famigliare” (“Family Sayings”), a book that has been translated into more than 10 languages. Carlo’s father, Leone, taught Russian literature at the University of Turin; his career ended because he refused to swear the oath of allegiance to the Fascist regime. In 1943, while directing an underground anti-Fascist newspaper in German-occupied Rome, he was imprisoned and tortured; he died in jail in February 1944. Meanwhile, Natalia and her three children, including 5-year-old Carlo, fled to the Tuscan hills, where they evaded the Nazis’ last attempt to slaughter as many Jews as possible while retreating from Allied forces.While still a young student, Ginzburg decided that he would study history, specifically focusing on the sentiments of the persecuted during witchcraft trials under the Inquisition. His prolific work on this topic has spanned decades. His fourth book, “The Cheese and the Worms” (1976), has been translated into 24 languages and is a standard on university syllabi worldwide.Ginzburg’s historical approach balances philological rigor and imaginative thinking. One influential method for which he is a forerunner is the microhistorical approach. A specific moment, place, individual, or group — often overlooked in grander histories — is analyzed with sharp focus. The implications of a specific case result in the construction of a new generalization.Ginzburg has referred to his feeling when undertaking a new historical inquiry as “euphoric ignorance,” denoting the joy of encountering a puzzling fragment of information or an unknown topic. An endeavor to make sense of it then follows. He found such moments full of embedded possibilities; thus, as he has said, he deliberately chose to delve into areas with which he was personally less familiar. Throughout his years of historical inquiry, Ginzburg has remained a part of living history, and his scholarship has continued to be informed by it. When discussing his own work, he occasionally indicates retroactive realizations on how certain political climates influenced his topical choices. Likewise, his initial choice of studying people persecuted during the witchcraft trials, he later realized, was influenced by various personal factors, including the fact that he and his family had been severely persecuted themselves.GAZETTE: Given the occasion of your Tanner Lectures, my first question relates to the general scope of the lecture series: Do you consider that there is one (or several) overriding ethical or moral charge(s) in your study of history?GINZBURG: A distinction should be made between ethical issues as a topic of historical research and the ethical implications of the historian’s work. Concerning the former, the general topic of my Tanner Lectures — casuistry and the controversies generated by it — has been at the center of debates about ethics for centuries, in different cultures. Even if my lectures will not address the relevance of casuistry in our world today, that relevance (especially related to bioethics) certainly provides the context in which my historical questions emerged. The ethical implications of the historian’s work are a different matter. I am fully aware of them, but I usually refrain from focusing explicitly on them, for a very simple reason: I dislike sermons, I detest preaching. The ethical side of the historian’s work must emerge from the work itself, since it is (in my view) synonymous with the search for truth, which historians must pursue. I say truth without quotation marks: The truth we are looking for is a human endeavor — fallible, revocable. That’s the reason why I insist on proofs — and disprovals. In the title of the Menahem Stern Lectures I gave in Jerusalem in 1993 — “History, Rhetoric, and Proof” — the polemical word was the last one, “proof.” But then I argued that despite the widespread perception of rhetoric and proof as mutually incompatible, proofs have been regarded as a central element of rhetoric from Aristotle, to Quintilian, to Valla — a tradition which had been ignored or tacitly dismissed by late-20th-century neo-skeptics. The ethical implications of my argument are obvious. If a contemporary neo-skeptic feels unable to refute the arguments (or pseudo-arguments) of so-called negationists who claim that the extermination of the European Jews never took place, then there must be something rotten in the historical profession. This neo-skepticism is largely out of fashion, but the need to place the search for truth (an extremely demanding task) at the center of the historian’s work is still there, and it will remain there.GAZETTE: In your early intellectual development, what are some of your most vivid memories and/or important moments of formation?GINZBURG: My intellectual trajectory has many roots, like anyone else’s. But working on Inquisition archival evidence has been fundamental — something I have sometimes compared to the field experience of an anthropologist. It shaped my later research in many ways, although after a few decades I started to work in different directions. I vividly remember the long days spent completely alone in the Udine Ecclesiastical Archive in the early ’60s (half a century ago, I can’t believe it) transcribing Inquisition trials nobody had seen before me — except for the inquisitors themselves. I was thrilled by what I read, thrilled by my solitude, thrilled by the encounter with a phenomenon (the benandanti) which no scholar had been aware of. Names of completely unknown peasants, men and women, emerged from those 16th-century trials — along with their dreams, their emotional reactions, and so forth. I have never since experienced something comparable in my life as a researcher.GAZETTE: Do you consider that chapter of your life, so to speak — referring to your early archival experiences — one that is still open?GINZBURG: Yes and no. That particular archival experience came to an end in 1989, with the publication of “Storia notturna” (translated into English as “Ecstasies: Deciphering the Witches’ Sabbath”): a book which sought to unfold, on a completely different spatial and chronological scale, the implications of my first one, “I benandanti” (translated into English as “The Night Battles”). But some of the issues I dealt with in “Ecstasies” — for instance the relationship between morphology and history — fueled much of my later work.GAZETTE: How might you regard the subsequent chapter in your life as a researcher? One notices an increasing presence of apparently disparate nodes in cultural history in your work.GINZBURG: What I have done since 1989 is difficult to describe: My research path may seem erratic, although I can detect a certain logic in it. Indeed, I have tried to repeat over and over the thrill of ignorance, addressing subjects I was completely unfamiliar with. First of all, I would say, it is a pleasure: I love teaching but I love learning much more. But there is probably another, more hidden, reason. I encountered my research topic, along with the books which deeply shaped my mind as a scholar, when I was in my 20s. Being precocious is not necessarily a bliss. Later I tried, more or less unconsciously, to disentangle myself from what I had become, testing what I had learned so far on new, unfamiliar topics. Casuistry was one of them. I first come across it in an essay on Machiavelli. Then Pascal came, and his opponents: the Jesuits. I will talk about both of them in my Tanner Lectures. But casuistry also required a reflection upon case studies and their implications. Once again, writing history and reflecting on the historian’s craft were inextricably connected, as they have always been since my early experiences in the Friulian archives.GAZETTE: You have written that you were often your own greatest antagonist and that you often held objections to your work that differed from those of your critics. Is this still so? If yes, what are your greatest objections as of now?GINZBURG: For a long time I have been fascinated by the devil’s advocate: a figure that has played a crucial role in Catholic canonization trials since the early 17th century. The topic of the Martin Buber lecture I gave in Jerusalem a few years ago was “Inner Dialogues. The Jew as Devil’s Advocate.” I feel involved in an endless, contentious conversation with the devil’s advocate. What does he say to me in these days? He says: “You are trying to tame me. You are not listening to me as you did in the past.” Maybe he is right. But self-satisfaction would be the end — a ludicrous end. I will try to do my best to avoid it. read more

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Union protests outside hiring

first_imgWhen a group of local union members began picketing in September in front of her soon-to-open Kilwin’s Chocolates & Ice Cream at Eddy Street Commons, Tricia Wainscott wondered why. “When I first saw the protesters, I felt horrible,” Wainscott, general manager of the store, said. “My initial reaction was to ask, ‘Why is this going on? What did we do?’” The protests came in response to Kilwin’s choice to use outside workers instead of union workers from the South Bend area, which did not help stimulate the local economy, said Troy Warner, assistant business manager of Local Union 153. Starting Sept. 23, several Local 153 members began picketing at Eddy Street twice a week in support of local workers, Warner said. The group held up signs that read, “Honk for local workers,” in hopes of raising awareness of the issue at hand. “We want the community and Kite Realty to know what’s going on, and we want to put pressure on Kilwin’s because another building at Eddy Street has yet to be developed,” Warner said. “We felt that this was the right time and the right place to get the message out.” But Wainscott said the Kilwin’s franchise, based in Michigan, chose the general contractor for the project without her individual input. “I would never not support non-union or non-local labor,” Wainscott said. “It was nothing personal, and it was all said and done before I knew anything had happened.” Although the general contractor was not locally based, Wainscott said local workers were employed in the installation of the store’s audio, security and fire alarm systems. The decision was also made without the influence of Kite Realty Group, which owns the Eddy Street Commons development, said Ashley Bedell, a project manager with Kite who worked on the Eddy Street project. She said each individual retailer has options when it comes to developing the space they rent. “We own the overall buildings, but when we do leases with individual retailers, they have the option of taking the space in a shell condition and hiring their own contractors to complete the buildout,” Bedell said. “The amount of work Kite does determines what the rental rate is, so it’s part of the business deal, and it varies from tenant to tenant.” Bedell said Kite has the power to control whether the development’s tenants choose contractors that complete quality work, and the general contractor for the Kilwin’s space, Indianapolis-based Alt Construction, has a history of completing quality developments. Bedell also said some union contractors were employed in the construction of the larger buildings at Eddy Street Commons. Warner said Kilwin’s use of a non-local general contractor did not support the struggling local economy or help to improve the unemployment rate of the members of Local 153, which he said hovered around 25 percent for the past year. “The unemployment rate in my union will probably get up to 30 or 35 percent this winter,” Warner said. “But this isn’t just a problem at Eddy Street. As the economy has tanked and construction has slowed, we’ve been seeing workers brought in from all over who are taking jobs from local workers.” So far, Warner said the public response to the protests has improved since the pickets first began. “The first week or so, people would just look at us as they drove by,” Warner said. “Now that we’ve been out there, they know why we’re there and they honk and wave, and some people even brought us food and coffee. “The reception from the public has been tremendous.” But Bedell said there have been no complaints from any of the other Eddy Street Commons retailers. “It’s an unfortunate situation and we wish it wasn’t the case, but it doesn’t cause too much of a disturbance,” Bedell said. Jay Murphy, manager of Kildare’s Pub, which is adjacent to Kilwin’s, has only noticed minor effects on his business because of the protests. “The only kickback we’ve gotten is that we got a call from a few suppliers who were double-checking that the workers were not protesting Kildare’s,” Murphy said. Warner believes the positive response from the community is important because it emphasizes the support for workers who are part of the South Bend community. “We need to support workers who pay taxes here, go to church here, whose kids go to school here,” Warner said. “It makes sense to keep as much money in the community so it can churn back through local businesses.”last_img read more

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Saint Mary’s TOMS club celebrates World Sight Day

first_imgPhoto courtesy of Nora Clougherty The TOMS Saint Mary’s campus club celebrated World Sight Day Thursday, encouraging students to wear sunglasses all day in order to raise awareness for blindness and other visual impairments around the world.Nora Clougherty, president of the TOMS club, said she felt it was important for people to know that TOMS gives back in more ways than just their “One for One” shoe campaign.“This day goes along with their TOMS sunglasses [campaign], for when you purchase a pair of their sunglasses, either prescription glasses or eye surgery is given to people in need,” she said. “In turn you are helping to give sight, one for one, just as all of their other [TOMS] products do.”The TOMS club reached the SMC community with a table in the student center where they distributed tattoos and stickers to both students and non-students.To spread the message further, Clougherty said the club offered photo props and sunglasses to people to pose with in order to share pictures on their social media.“Throughout the whole day we asked participants to use #GiveSight when posting pictures,” she said.  “It could have been pictures of them in their sunglasses spreading the movement or of a view that they were grateful to see everyday.”Clougherty said she thought the club was very successful in helping people learn more about TOMS and spreading awareness of World Sight Day.“This is an issue that many people don’t know about or even know that it can be easily cured,” she said. “We had countless people coming up to the table asking why we were wearing our sunglasses.”The TOMS SMC Club also has several other events planned for the rest of the year, Clougherty said.“We want to have a ‘Style Your Sole’ party where you purchase a pair of classic TOMS [shoes], and we all come together to paint them,” she said. “Our biggest event is in the spring for ‘One Day Without Shoes.’”Clougherty said the purpose of “One Day Without Shoes” is to encourage people to go barefoot for an entire day so that someone else does not have to.“One of the main goals of the TOMS SMC campus club is to simply spread the message of ‘One for One’ and what TOMS does and how you can participate or help in the cause,” she said.Tags: #GiveSight, One for One, sight, TOMS, World Sight Daylast_img read more

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Some CARTS Routes Canceled Due To Weather

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Image by Justin Gould/WNYNewsNow.JAMESTOWN – Chautauqua Area Regional Transit System, also known as CARTS, will not be running several routes due to winter weather.Route 2 and 9 are cancelled;Route 6 will have no Dunkirk to Mayville run at 9:10 a.m. and no Mayville to Dunkirk run at 12:10 p.m.;Route 7 will have no Jamestown to Mayville run at 2:50 p.m. and no Mayville to Jamestown run at 4:35 p.m.;Route 8 will have no Jamestown to Dunkirk run at 1:20 p.m. and no Dunkirk to Jamestown run at 3:05 p.m.;Route 12 will have no run from Jamestown to Cassadaga at 3:30 p.m.;Route 16 will not be running the Jamestown to Frewsburg run at 2:50 p.m. or the 4:35p.m. from Jamestown to Mayville; andRoute 19 will have no Jamestown to Dunkirk run at 4:35 p.m. and no Dunkirk to Jamestown run at 5:20 p.m.If a ride is not absolutely necessary, CARTS asks that passengers call the CARTS Office to cancel their rides.If passengers have any questions, they can contact the CARTS office at (716) 665-6466.last_img read more

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Cops: Armed East Meadow Man Shot by Police

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York An altercation between two East Meadow neighbors Friday night ended with police shooting a suspect who they say threatened officers with two guns, Nassau County police said.Jason Wissel, 49, was charged with menacing and three counts of criminal possession of a weapon.Police said Wissel was involved in an argument over parking with a neighbor, whom he allegedly threatened with a gun, police said.Officers from nearby precincts as well as the Emergency Service Unit, K-9, and Bureau of Special Operations responded after police were called.After attempting to make contact with Wissel, police said he emerged from the house allegedly armed with a sawed off shotgun and a long rifle.“The suspect pointed these weapons at approaching officers placing them in fear for their lives,” police said in a news release.Officers fired at Wissel, causing minor injuries, police said.After receiving treatment at Nassau University Medical Center, Wissel was arrested, police said. It’s unclear how many shots were fired.Investigators also discovered several weapons and a cache of ammunition inside the house, police said.Wissel was scheduled to be arraigned Saturday at First District Court in Hempstead.last_img read more

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6 tips to maximize social media marketing campaigns

first_imgby: Carie SchelfhaudtNot long ago, about the only way to get people to like your financial institution’s Facebook page or follow you on Twitter was to offer a monetary incentive, usually in the form of a giveaway or contest. But you don’t need to give away tablets, TVs and cash to get people to connect with you on social media. Here are six tips to help grow your social media community and increase the effectiveness of your campaigns in social channels.1. Create personasStart by building the top four personas that represent the kind of people you want to attract. Use these personas as the basis for four different social media campaigns, with each campaign having a different audience and budget. Developing the personas and the structure of the ad campaigns before determining copy and images will allow you to determine the type of ad that will resonate with each persona. And, you’ll be able to optimize the budgets for each campaign once you determine which campaign is the most effective. After all, your financial institution has more than one product, multiple demographics and even multiple touch points that would resonate with different audiences. Shouldn’t your social media messaging be customized to your audience as well? continue reading » 19SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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