Brown’s tax credit plans aim to boost productivity

first_img Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Article Proposals outlined by the Chancellor in his pre-budget statement to helpemployers become more productive and develop their staff have been welcomed bythe CIPD and the CBI. Gordon Brown announced plans to provide financial support for employerswhose staff take time off for learning as well as free learning provision foremployees. The Government is also to give research and development tax credits forlarge companies to encourage innovation. It is hoped that the workforce development measures will replace theIndividual Learning Accounts initiative closed down last month because of abuseby some training providers. They will be tested through a number of pilotschemes from September 2002. These include the provision of tax credits to compensate employers for thetime employees spend on training and giving low-skilled employees between 35and 70 hours of time off each year on full pay to devote to training. The proposals also incorporate incentives for successful completion ofcourses and levels of subsidy up to 100 per cent for courses and accreditationcosts. John Philpott, chief economist at the CIPD, backed the Government’s plans togive employers incentives to encourage workforce development. He said, “Given the disappointing performance of Individual LearningAccounts, we are delighted that the training tax credit proposals are to beconsulted on with employers. “However, the institute believes that these should initially beintroduced as a temporary rather than a permanent measure so that their netimpact can be evaluated.” Digby Jones, director general of the CBI, said employers will be pleased theChancellor is pressing ahead with plans to introduce R&D and training taxcredits. “Companies are crying out for tax credits for R&D which will beparticularly important to recession-hit manufacturers,” he said. “We must take action to sort out the basic skills problem, which is anational disgrace that is harming our economy,” he said. By Ben Willmott Brown’s tax credit plans aim to boost productivityOn 4 Dec 2001 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

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NCAA alters ‘Rich Paul rule’ following criticism

first_img Beau Lund FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailfilipfoto/iStock(NEW YORK) — Days after introducing controversial certifications requirements for agents to represent college basketball players considering whether to enter the NBA Draft, the NCAA has changed those qualifications, no longer requiring those agents to have a bachelor’s degree.Agents seeking to represent those athletes will now have to be in good standing with the National Basketball Players Association.“We are committed to providing student-athletes who are deciding whether to stay in school or explore NBA draft options with access to a wide array of resources to make their decision,” said the NCAA in a statement.The statement said the original requirements were meant to fulfill that goal, but that because “several current agents who have appropriately represented former student-athletes in their professional quest and whom the National Basketball Players Association has granted waivers of its bachelor’s degree requirement.”The original rules were criticized by many, largely because a number of current NBA agents did not attend college. Rich Paul, who represents NBA stars like LeBron James, Chris Paul, Ben Simmons and Anthony Davis, does not have a college degree. James and Paul were vocal in their criticism of the degree requirement for agents.Other requirements for agents to represent college athletes considering their draft options include certification by the NBPA for three years, payment of required fees, and an in-person NCAA qualification exam.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved. August 13, 2019 /Sports News – National NCAA alters ‘Rich Paul rule’ following criticismcenter_img Written bylast_img read more

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South Korea launches first FF-II frigate

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today South Korea launches first FF-II frigate South Korean shipbuilder Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering (DSME) has launched the nation’s first FF-II guided-missile frigate at its Geoje shipyard.The ship was named Daegu and received pennant number 818 during a ceremony held June 2.Displacing 2800 tonnes, the new frigate measures 122 meters in length and can reach speeds of 30 knots, DSME said.According to the South Korean News agency Yonhap News, the improved Incheon-class frigate is capable of hitting targets on North Korean territory.Daegu will be equipped with a 16-cell Korean vertical launching system for defense against air threats and six torpedo tubes for anti-submarine warfare, IHS Jane’s wrote.DSME said the ship would delivered to the Navy in 2017 and is expected to become operational in the second half of 2018. Share this article View post tag: DSME View post tag: Republic of Korea Navy Authoritiescenter_img View post tag: FF-II frigate June 7, 2016 View post tag: FFX II South Korea launches first FF-II frigatelast_img read more

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​Twitter user again terrorizes Bayonne students, schools stay open

first_img× BAYONNE – Another shooting threat against students and faculty of the Bayonne school district was lodged by the same Twitter account that threatened to “shoot up all Bayonne public schools” over the weekend and resulted in a district-wide closure on Monday.The newest threat, posted at 10:19 p.m. on Monday by @IMorenalaz under the name Ispakagan Morenalaz, read, “Nice, you evacuated. I got 4 more days to shoot up the school hahaha gonna be fun,” and ended with “tomorrow.”The Twitter account was created and deleted the same day as its original post, then reactivated for the second. An investigation into the identity of the accountholder is ongoing, according to city officials.Interim Schools Superintendent Michael A. Wanko said that the district is on heightened alert, and Bayonne police and Hudson County Sheriff officers will be stationed at every school. At a press conference on Monday, Mayor Davis said the city’s response has been in coordination with the Sheriff’s Office and the FBI.last_img read more

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Tornado Watch Extended to 1AM

first_imgAbout the Author: Harry HolmesMeteorologist – OCNJDaily.com Resides in Ocean City. Graduated from Millersville University with a B.S in Meteorology. Worked as a Weather Producer/Meteorologist at NBC10, Fox29 in Philadelphia and WCBS in New York. Also a Realtor, at Berkshire Hathaway Home Services in Ocean City, NJ.last_img

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Mayor’s Update: May 11

first_imgMayor Jay Gillian Dear Friends,Road construction crews will be paving roads in the next couple weeks in a push to complete jobs before the summer season starts.Work will begin Monday on final paving of 34th Street from Bay Avenue to West Avenue, and the road will be closed overnight from 8 p.m. Monday to 6 a.m. Tuesday, then again 8 p.m. Tuesday to 6 a.m. Wednesday. Access to Bay Avenue to and from the 34th Street Bridge will remain open.Crews were out today paving Wesley Road/Avenue between Battersea and First Street, and work on that project will continue with the paving of East Atlantic Boulevard and North Street.In the Fourth Ward neighborhood drainage project, work is focused on completing installation of the pumping station at 30th Street. In the First Ward drainage project, crews have moved from Second Street to Fourth Street. The new outfall pipe at Ninth Street is in place and work to restore the beach is underway.The U.S. Postal Service Food Drive takes place tomorrow (Saturday, May 12). Residents are asked to place non-perishable food items in bags by their mailboxes for pickup on Saturday. All food will be donated to the Ocean City Ecumenical Council Community Food Cupboard. See more information.Former Philadelphia Eagle Jon Dorenbos will be in town tomorrow as Martin Z. Mollusk seeks his shadow to predict an early summer for Ocean City. The event is always a good time, and it starts at 11 a.m. on the beach next to the Ocean City Music Pier. Dorenbos returns tomorrow night to perform magic in a sold-out show at the Music Pier.On a personal note, Michele and I would like to congratulate our daughter Emily on her graduation from the Richard Stockton College of New Jersey and our son Joshua on his marriage this weekend to Lauren. Our families could not be more happy for them.I’d also like to wish a Happy Mother’s Day to all the moms in town. I hope you all get a chance to relax and enjoy the day with your families.Warm regards,Jay A. GillianMayorlast_img read more

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Season retains sparkle

first_imgAstraw poll of bakeries up and down the country has revealed that the meltdown on the high street witnessed by non-food retailers has not yet infected bakery retailers. While many felt twitchy throughout December, the last few days before Christmas came good, with sales often matching – or even exceeding – those of 2007.For 19-shop Chatwins of Nantwich, like-for-like sales were down. It saw a dip of 3-5% in the five weeks from the beginning of December to the first week in January, but this was tempered by better-performing sales of savoury lines such as sausage rolls. “Sales of traditional Christmas items were down, as people scaled back,” said joint MD Trevor Mooney.The upwards savouries trend has also helped Greggs achieve strong sales figures over the festive period. The company said like-for-like sales over Christmas, comprising the four weeks to January 3, increased 5.3%. This no doubt prompted CEO Ken McMeikan to announce a step-up in store openings to 50 a year from 2010.Those who made an extra effort with windows or products seem to have reaped the rewards. Christopher Freeman of one-shop Dunns of Crouch End, North London, reported that sales of mince pies, chocolate logs, Christmas puddings and stollen went very well, with turnover up 4% and footfall up 1.5%. “We felt that when customers wanted something really good, they knew where to come. We made fabulous window displays. We opened again on the Saturday after Christmas and bread sales that week were up,” he said.== Non-bakery boost ==A focus on non-bakery food boosted sales for 10-shop business Janes Pantry in Gloucester in the two weeks commencing December 22 and 29, by 5.5% on last year. The arrival of a chef in December gave a more rounded offering, including a new range of five fresh homemade soups, hot meals and hot sandwiches, including a turkey version for Christmas, which were an immediate hit. “The build-up to Christmas was slow, but we had a really buoyant last three days,” said Janes Pantry MD Neville Morse.Others have had to redouble their efforts just to tread water. Gloucestershire craft firm Hobbs House Bakery began selling mince pies a week earlier than 2007, offering six-packs for the first time as well as in-store sampling and evening openings. This helped edge up mince pie sales by 0.5% on last year to 30,000.Even where Christmas sales matched those of 2007, some were predicting a tough 2009. “There are fewer shoppers on the high street,” said Thomas Adams, MD of the Northampton-based 28-shop Oliver Adams bakery chain. “Confidence is the problem. The press is talking us into a recession, as people believe what they read.”Others have felt the pinch in wholesale supply due to lay-offs at nearby firms. The Cavan Bakery in Hampton, Surrey saw overall sales down 22%. “There are lay-offs on industrial estates, which we supply via third parties,” said Jeff Greenall. While Christmas products sold well, bread and savouries fell off and customer spend in its three outlets was also down 4-5%. “We sensed an air of caution among shoppers,” he added. Yet an investment in ovens and a new fourth shop in Teddington, mean he is “cautiously optimistic about 2009”.Carol Herd, MD of three-shop business Peter Herds of Wilmslow, Cheshire, said 2008 Christmas trading rose 7% on 2007, following a marketing push and efficiency drive. “Over the year we got our costs down – but not quality. Our Christmas cakes, logs and tortes all went well. I’m a fighter so I’m quite optimistic about 2009.”last_img read more

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For Libya, ‘no compromise’ in sight

first_imgWhen the popular protests that have swept the Mideast reached Libya in mid-February, Ali Suleiman Aujali knew what he had to do. The longtime Libyan diplomat, who had served as ambassador to the United States for the past two years, abruptly quit and threw his support behind the rebel uprising.Libyan leader Moammar “Gadhafi made it very easy for me,” Aujali told a packed audience at the John F. Kennedy Jr. Forum on Tuesday (March 29). “He is killing his own people without discrimination and without limit.”When dealing with an authoritarian ruler such as Gadhafi, Aujali said, he learned that “there is no compromise.”It was a lesson that Aujali hoped to drive home at Harvard, and one that the United States and its allies must learn now that they have entered the escalating conflict, he said at “Libya After the No-Fly Zone: Political Change or Civil War?” — a discussion hosted by the Harvard Kennedy School’s (HKS) Middle East Initiative and the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs and moderated by R. Nicholas Burns, Sultan of Oman Professor of the Practice of International Relations at HKS.Aujali, who is now a part of the unrecognized transitional government of Libya, said Libyans are united in their desire to see Gadhafi go, and urged the United States to provide arms and money to rebels to help speed his exit. “Libyans want some justice, and they want help for their future,” he said. “We want also, of course, to exercise our right as a democratic country.”But the road to Libyan democracy is paved with unanswered questions: How strong are Gadhafi’s forces on the ground? Just who are the rebel forces the American-backed international coalition is supporting? And now that the United States has intervened in a potentially protracted civil war, how does it formulate an efficient and effective strategy for putting Libya on a path to true reform?To help answer those questions, Aujali was joined by Dirk Vandewalle, associate professor of government at Dartmouth College and an authority on Libyan politics, and Stephen Walt, Robert and Renée Belfer Professor of International Affairs and faculty chair of HKS’s International Security Program.American leaders shouldn’t make the mistake of thinking Gadhafi can be negotiated with, Vandewalle argued. Gadhafi, who rules Libya more like a warlord than a modern head of state, is driven by a kind of “tribal ethos” to maintain power at all costs and to quash dissent within his ranks. Furthermore, Vandewalle said, Gadhafi “truly believes … that he represents the true voice of the Arab people.”“If you live in that kind of self-referential world for so long, where no one ever questions you, you come to believe what you’re saying,” Vandewalle said.Where Aujali was hopeful for a democratic Libya, Vandewalle was skeptical. Libya has had “no real institutions or state to speak of” since Gadhafi came to power, he said. “How likely is democracy in a country that doesn’t even have the very basic institutions of what democracies need to sustain themselves?”In the short term, the international coalition that instituted a no-fly zone in Libya on March 18 will have to figure out how to get Gadhafi out — and how it will respond if he doesn’t leave quickly and quietly.“The best outcome here is a rapid transition of power,” Walt said. “If this [allied intervention] is a success, NATO will get some credit, and the United States will get a lot of the credit … but if this goes south, the U.S. will end up getting a lot of the blame as well.”The allied air strikes arrived just in time to save the lives of perhaps tens of thousands of Libyans in Benghazi, the panelists agreed. But the danger, Walt said, is that what began as a humanitarian intervention in Libya could ultimately lead to much more bloodshed if Gadhafi isn’t driven from power soon. If he remains steadfastly in power, Walt said, America and its allies “will face a whole series of very awkward choices” on whether to arm or provide funds to the rebel army, and perhaps even whether to send ground troops into the country.“This is a society that most of us don’t understand particularly well, and getting a desirable outcome is not going to be easy and not going to be quick,” Walt said.But if the United States and its allies help see Libya through a gradual transition to representative government, Aujali concluded, the United States could finally achieve that most elusive of successes, one that today seems as unlikely as Mideast revolutions did before this year: “more respect and more credibility in the Arab world.”last_img read more

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Seniors head to Peace Corps

first_imgNotre Dame ranked 18th among medium-sized schools this year to send the most volunteers to serve in the group, according to a University press release. The University jumped five spots on the list from last year as the Peace Corps prepares to mark its 50th anniversary, the release said. Notre Dame was included on this list for the past 11 years. Peace Corps recruiter Rok Teasley said Notre Dame averaged 23 applicants to the group in each of the past four years. Nineteen seniors applied already this year, and the rolling application process is ongoing. Current seniors wishing to join the 25 Notre Dame alumni currently serving in the Peace Corps must first complete a grueling application process, according to the release. Senior Claire Brosnihan said the process includes a lengthy online application, an hour-long interview with very specific and personal questions, and multiple steps of clearance, contributing to months of waiting. Brosnihan, a political science major with a minor in peace studies, said she would be stationed in French-speaking sub-Saharan Africa to work on a malnutrition-focused public health program. “The Peace Corps gives you a different perspective from South Bend, Indiana and Notre Dame,” Brosnihan said. “Putting all of your beliefs into action is a big part of it.” Brosnihan said she would like to work in international relations or at an international non-profit organization after her time in the Peace Corps. Senior Shannon Coyne will also join the Peace Corps after graduation. A political science and Arabic double major with a minor in peace studies, Coyne said she will be teaching English in either Jordan or Morocco. “I was attracted to the principles that underlie the mission of the [Peace Corps],” Coyne said. “I was interested in post-graduate service, and it seemed like a logical choice.” Coyne said her minor in Peace Studies prepared her for her time in the Peace Corps. “Peace Studies classes are good for helping you think about ways to promote international development,” Coyne said. “But more than my studies, my experiences outside the classroom really prepared me.” Coyne participated in service through the Center for Social Concerns and the Kellogg Institute, and traveled to Ghana and Cairo, Egypt through the University, which provided invaluable service experiences for her. Coyne said she is most interested in gender issues and will seek a master’s degree in development after leaving the Peace Corps in hopes of working for a non-governmental organization. Megan Conway, a 2006 Notre Dame graduate, also studied Peace Studies while she was a student. She joined the Peace Corps after graduation and is now at the University of Michigan Law School. Conway said a class on tropical African politics she took as an undergraduate piqued her interest in Africa. She was stationed in Cameroon, where she worked on public health initiatives. “We worked with potable water projects, AIDS education, basic health and hygiene and environmental education classes,” Conway said. “And I focused in pre-natal care projects.” Although her time in the Peace Corps was rewarding and worthwhile, Conway said she learned that international sustainable development, more specifically public health, was not the field for her. “I had a phenomenal experience, but I realized that I didn’t want to live abroad for the rest of my life,” Conway said. Conway said the unique undergraduate experience at Notre Dame contributed to her choice to join the Peace Corps. “I don’t think I would have joined the Peace Corps if I had attended one of the other universities I was thinking of,” Conway said. Notre Dame’s relationship can be attributed to the University’s mission to serve others, Coyne said. “It’s definitely the emphasis that Notre Dame students put on service,” Coyne said, “and taking what you learn in the classroom to give back to others.”last_img read more

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Plans for Carmichael coal mine in Australia run into another roadblock

first_imgPlans for Carmichael coal mine in Australia run into another roadblock FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享The Guardian:The controversial Carmichael coalmine has been delayed indefinitely by the Queensland government, which has ruled that Adani’s proposals to protect the endangered black-throated finch do not meet the miner’s approval conditions.The decision, made by the state environment department and not by the political arm of government, forces Adani to complete significant additional work before it can begin construction of the mine.The finch management plan is one of two key hurdles before Adani can start work on its mine. The second is a groundwater plan, which also requires state approval and is under review.In a statement, the department said it was seeking a number of new commitments from Adani, including that the company gathers more accurate information about the black-throated finch population “which is vital to effectively manage and monitor the impacts of the project on the … finch and essential habitats in the project area”.While the decision was welcomed by environmentalists, amid an election campaign where Adani’s coal project has become a significant issue, it does not amount to a rejection or a block on the Carmichael mine. In some respects, the advice from the department offers Adani a clear path to approval of the plan, by outlining the actions authorities require.More: Queensland delays Adani mine indefinitely, citing fears for endangered finchlast_img read more

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