Tesco posts worst sales in 20 years

first_imgTesco fell victim to the consumer slump with its worst UK sales in 20 years while rival Sainsbury’s reported only modest growth.Tesco said UK second-half profits will be flat following its recent £500m investment in price cuts in a bid to boost market share, which fell from 30.8% to 30.4% in recent weeks.It said that UK sales excluding new store space, VAT and petrol fell 0.9% in the three months to August 27. The group reported a 12% in underlying profits to £1.9bn in the half-year, boosted by a strong performance in Asia.Sales rose 9% to £35.5bn.Sainsbury’s said same-store sales including VAT increased by 1.9% in the 16 weeks to October 1, the same increase as the previous quarter.Sainsbury’s, which recently changed its slogan to ‘Live Well For Less’, described its performance as “good” in a tough consumer environment.last_img read more

Read More →

Video: BB75 Lunch

first_imgThe first BB75 Lunch, held at The Boundary in Shoreditch, London, saw top executives from the UK retail bakery sector attend.Key note speeches were given by Dr Oliver Blank of German shopfitting firm Aichinger, and Greggs’ chief executive Ken McMeikan. British Baker talked to McMeikan about the company’s performance in 2011, what’s in store for the next 12 months and the importance of the BB75 lunch.British Baker will be launching a series of Behind BB75 videos over the next couple of weeks, with exclusive interviews from the UK’s top retail bakery firms.Music: Pasadena by Emerald Park (Creative Commons licence)YouTube link: http://youtu.be/gXVgN-9Bxjklast_img read more

Read More →

Panelists promote awareness of unhealthy relationships

first_imgRosie LoVoi | The Observer Panelists gather in DeBartolo Hall on Wednesday night to teach students how to identify and cope with unhealthy relationships. The speakers confronted issues such as stalking and emotional abuse.The panel was comprised of Heather Ryan, an on-campus Deputy Title IX Coordinator; Maggie Skoch, a senior resident assistant (RA) and former president of National Alliance of Mental Illness at Notre Dame (NAMI-ND); Maureen Lafferty, a psychologist at the University Counseling Center; and Ben Brockman, a senior RA.Throughout the panel, audience members were presented with specific scenarios involving various types of concerning behavior. They were then asked to text in opinions on how they would handle the situation based on options presented in a follow-up poll. Both panel members and audience members examined the poll results together and went on to engage in open discussions on the situations, behaviors and solutions presented. Audience members were able to freely ask questions, offer insight and disagree with panel members.The first scenario presented described a college-aged boy, “Robert,” who has recently started dating a new girlfriend and finds himself being contacted continually and aggressively by an ex-girlfriend over text, Facebook and email. The ex-girlfriend’s reactions range from angry to nostalgic to desperate. Audience members were presented with three options for how to handle the situation: confront the ex-girlfriend forcefully, give her a chance to explain herself or ignore her.Led by the panelists, audience members picked apart the scenario, considering, for instance, if they knew definitely that Robert did not want to get back together with his ex-girlfriend, and if confronting her would take the form of a fight or a conversation. Rather than choose a ‘right’ answer, the short-term and long-term benefits and disadvantages of each method of reaction were weighed by both the audience and panel members.“I would say the most important thing is to understand the breadth of the situation,” Brockman said, “So that’s asking more questions. You may feel like you’re prying, you may feel like you’re being blunt with so many questions, but that’s what you have to do in order to get answers. So most important is to understand what’s going through their head, how they’re feeling and going from there to make decisions.”After discussing the situation thoroughly, audience members were asked how their reactions would differ if certain aspects were different. When presented with the question of how the situation would differ if the genders of Robert and his ex-girlfriend were reversed, panel members stressed the behavior described is equally concerning regardless of gender and regardless of if the couple had been homosexual instead of heterosexual.Panelists and audience members then shared opinions on when the situation could begin to be considered stalking, noting that there isn’t always a clear set of guidelines to defining such behavior.The second scenario presented described a hypothetical friend, “Laura,” approaching audience members and confiding that she was recently sexually assaulted but is now seeking counseling. Audience members answered a poll which offered three different ways of handling the situation: to keep an eye on Laura but not mention the issue with her; to continually press her to talk more about the assault; and to tell an RA that Laura may need help without describing her specific situation.Panel members discussed the importance of respecting someone’s privacy and comfort levels, while walking the line between intrusion and providing necessary help.“I understand that it’s [important] to respect their privacy, but maybe more important, before you walk away from the situation, is to express both love and also let her know that this is absolutely not her fault by any means,” Brockman said.“I think when we’re working with someone who has experienced this, we are hoping to give back their agency,” Lafferty said, “And so I think it’s really important to consider how the decisions that you’re making could impact that agency.”RAs were noted as a useful resource to go to when one is confronted with a friend facing sexual assault. The importance of assessing a friend’s wishes in such a situation was also emphasized.“I think affirming their decision to seek help at a counseling center was really important,” Skoch said, “Asking permission to ask questions is OK, too. ‘Do you mind if I ask a couple questions about this?’ If they say no, that’s OK. It’s OK to be present to what the person is experiencing without being fully able to fix or address what they’re going through.”Various methods of appropriately approaching a friend with concern were discussed as well.“You might start with, ‘I’m worried about your mental health,’ ” Skoch said, “I say that with a slight chuckle, but very sincerely, it’s OK to say the words that you’re trying to get across. You don’t have to necessarily beat around the bush, you don’t have to be blunt in an insensitive way, but it’s OK to ask that question itself, because I think it names what’s going on, perhaps in a way that ‘Laura’ hasn’t thought about it yet.”The third scenario presented described a roommate, “Ashley,” whose new boyfriend has caused her to become cut off from friends. Additionally, Ashley’s self-esteem has visibly suffered due to her boyfriend’s constantly belittling comments. Audience members were once again presented with three options: confronting Ashley with a group of friends; trusting Ashley’s insistence that her relationship is a healthy one; and suggesting that Ashley makes an appointment with the counseling center to get a second opinion.Confronting Ashley as a group was generally disavowed by audience members, who came to the consensus that such a method would come off as too adversarial and ‘ganging up’ on her. Audience members were advised to ‘be careful, not confrontational,’ and to approach friends in similar situations from a place of concern and care.“They may very well say, ‘Yeah, I’ve noticed these things too, but it’s just who they are, that’s how our relationship works,’ “ Brockman said, “At that point, there’s cause for concern simply in the fact that a lot of times our gut opinions aren’t wrong. It may be that you need to go talk to another friend about this, or that you can have not a confrontation, but a conversation.”The “Ashley” situation was particularly interesting because it bordered on the line between simple devotion to a significant other and a significant other acting controlling. Audience and panel members discussed how to notice signs for concern amidst typically normal behavior within a relationship.The fourth and final scenario described an argument between two platonic best friends and roommates, “Carlos” and “Mark,” escalating into physical violence. After Carlos receives a black eye from Mark, Carlos has reservations about continuing to live with him, but brushes the punch off as a “kind of thing” that “happens between the guys all the time.”Panel members pointed out that physical violence should never be justified as simply typical, ‘boys will be boys’ behavior among males, and that physical escalation in an argument is never acceptable.While audience members were informed on the difference between domestic violence and Carlos and Mark’s situation — which would not qualify as domestic violence due to their platonic relationship — they also discussed how the situation would be different if the two were boyfriends instead of best friends, noting the intensification of emotional impact that situation would bring.Throughout the panel, Gender Relations Center (GRC) members stood at the back of the room to offer support for audience members who might become emotionally upset at the scenarios being discussed. Additionally, multiple sources were cited as resources to turn to in cases of various types of emotional and physical violence.Above all, bystander interaction was stressed in all situations.“Often an early intervention is not going to get a whole lot of play,” Lafferty said while describing “Ashley’s” hypothetical boyfriend. “She’s not letting (herself) hear this. I think as a friend, if you’re sensing that, you back off and say, ‘OK, just checking, concerned, but love you,’ and then you stay in her life. You make sure that you’re there if and when she starts to get scared or worried that this is a problem. Because sometimes we get frustrated with friends like this, when we see them doing something self-destructive, and then we just back down.“Then, when they need someone, there’s no one around.”Tags: Ben Brockman, deputy title IX coordinator, Gender Relations Center, Heather Ryan, Maggie Skoch, Maureen Lafferty, NAMI, Title IX The Gender Relations Center hosted a panel Wednesday night in DeBartolo Hall entitled, “What would YOU do?: When a relationship may not be healthy.” The panel, which featured four main speakers and interactive dialogue with audience members, closely analyzed several concerning situations within relationships and how to handle them appropriately.last_img read more

Read More →

Saint Mary’s seniors share favorite college memories

first_imgWith Commencement right around the corner, members of Saint Mary’s Class of 2017 took some time to share their memories and reflect on the experiences they’ve had during their time as a Belle.Communication studies major Jackie Rooney said one thing she will remember the most about Saint Mary’s is Midnight Breakfast.“A big one is Midnight Breakfast — what other school does that, you know?” Rooney said. “It’s just so fun, it’s like a party and it’s a great way to de-stress and also come together and celebrate the end of a semester that’s always so fun. It doesn’t matter who you’re sitting next to or who you’re standing by. You dance with everyone.”Rooney said she and her friends share a special memory they will never forget.“We do this thing, and we don’t do it often, but we’ve done it a few times and it’s just the best thing in the whole world,” Rooney said. “We park in front of Le Mans [Hall] at night time, and we turn on music and just blare it. We get out of the car, and we just dance in front of Le Mans to the music, and it’s just so fun and it’s magical, and you don’t ever want it to end. It’s a very special moment that I’ll hold forever. And I’m hoping when we come back for our reunions, we’ll still do it.”Rooney said the friendships she made during her time at Saint Mary’s will stay with her forever.“Every relationship you have here adds to who you are,” Rooney said. “I have friends that I met abroad. I have friends who live in Ireland who I am still very good friends with. And then my roommate and then a bunch of friends from all walks of life — I think they all add to who you are as a new person coming out of college.”Communication studies and Italian major Kate Fitzmaurice said that Saint Mary’s has helped her develop confidence.“Looking back to freshman year, I would have never guessed I would be in the position I am now, and I’m really proud of where I am and my life right now,” Fitzmaurice said. “And I think that, especially through classroom experience and just being in an environment where you are accepted and the girls are there not to judge you and not to compete with you, but really to build you up … that in itself builds confidence.”Fitzmaurice said her study abroad experience contributed to some of her best memories of her time at Saint Mary’s.“My love for other cultures stemmed from my time in Rome,” she said. “My friendships that I made in Rome are some of the best friendships that I could have ever asked for. I know those girls are going to be with me until the end of time.”Nursing major Maggie Carswell said working for Office of Civic and Social Engagement [OCSE] has been hugely rewarding and has provided her with some lifelong memories.“I’m the student director there, and I’ve been there since my freshman year, and definitely my favorite memories have been through that office,” Carswell said. “Just getting together with my friends and doing some community service, that’s definitely been great because not only do I get to build memories with my friends, I get to help out the community as well.”Carswell is also class council president and said the events she has put together have been some of her fondest memories.“Class council is meant to do events for the class, so I’ve been helping them plan events and also parent weekends and we also planned senior week,” she said.Carswell said one event in particular stood out to her when she thought about her what class council has done.“I’ve always liked our Galantine’s Day event,” Carswell said. “It’s just meant to celebrate your friendships with all your friends, and it is a night to relax. The event was just in the dorm lounge, and everyone could come, grab some food and write some letters to their friends. I liked the sentiment behind it.”Megan Carswell, Maggie’s sister and nursing major, said her best memories of Saint Mary’s go back to her first year.“Freshman year, I switched roommates within the third week, and I moved onto the fourth floor of McCandless [Hall], and right next to me were these two girls, and my roommate and I became really great friends through that year,” Carswell said. “I just have such fond memories of that little corner of McCandless we would always hang out in.”Megan Carswell also works in the OCSE office and said she is going to miss her friends from the office, along with others she has become close to on campus.“I think something unique to my Saint Mary’s experience has been the friends I’ve made though the service of this office,” she said. “I don’t want to say I’m going to lose those connections, but it is going to be weird not seeing my boss everyday, seeing my professors all the time and having those really strong mentors and everything right within my reach. And not having my friends close by — I really am going to miss not being close in proximity to my friends.”Philosophy major Stephanie Villareal said the best memories she has of Saint Mary’s are the times she remembers sitting in the dining hall with friends.“When you’re in the dining hall with your friends, you’re like ‘OK, we’re just going to go for a very quick meal,’ and then one quick meal that was supposed to take half an hour turns into like three hours,” Villareal said. “And three hours is a long time, but it doesn’t feel like a long time because you’re having a great conversation and a good time not doing anything with the people that you love the most.”Villareal said she will always remember how open and welcoming the people of Saint Mary’s have been since the very beginning of her time as a student there.“Freshman year, I lived in Holy Cross [Hall] and I remember my parents dropping me off and it was just like a movie,” she said. “They start driving away and I was standing right in front of Holy Cross and I remember just sobbing so much because I had never been this far away from home without knowing anyone. I just remember thinking ‘How am I going to find my place here?’”The community welcomed her in no time, Villareal said.“But after two days and meeting new people, what I will remember the most is just feeling completely welcome in a community that I was so new to,” Villareal said. “It’s just the relationships and the people. Saint Mary’s is a very special place, but I think it’s definitely the people that add so much to the environment and the community. It doesn’t compare to anything else. That’s for sure.”Tags: Class Council, Commencement, Office of Civic and Social Engagementlast_img read more

Read More →

College to host musical fundraising event

first_imgSaint Mary’s is hosting a chamber music concert, Music for Food, to promote local music groups and support the Food Bank of Northern Indiana.Music for Food is an event to raise money and awareness for food inequality throughout the United States while providing entertainment through concerts. The charity was founded by Kim Kashkashian, a Grammy-winning violinist, as a way to combine music and community service. Tanya Gabrielian is a renowned pianist who had previously performed in a Music for Food event before moving to Indiana. When she moved, she noticed that there was no Music for Food branch in Indiana. “I decided to start one here,” Gabrielian said. “So, I’ve organized this event [and] reached out to the Food Bank of Northern Indiana to be our community partner.”Gabrielian said she hopes that Music for Food will do more than raise money. She wants music in itself to be used to promote activism. “I hope that [Music for Food] will bring people to the concert that have not yet had the opportunity to hear live music performed in this way,” she said. “The concert is donation-based so that if someone can’t pay the suggested donation, they are still welcome to attend.“We are hoping not only to raise funds for the Food Bank of Northern Indiana but to make music accessible for all members of our community. Also, we are using music as a tool for activism, and I think this is a powerful force in social change.”Gabrielian said she is excited to be involved in a collaboration between musicians from local colleges.“I love performing, so every opportunity to do so gives me a great amount of joy. Also, it’s a great way to get local musicians involved,” Gabrelian said. “When I moved here in the fall, I realized how many local colleges there are and great musicians, but there wasn’t a huge amount of communication of camaraderie between them.“This concert features musicians from Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s, IUSB, Bethel College and Andrews University, and the very nature of chamber music involves working together with your fellow musicians to create a cohesive performance. I think this can stand as a metaphor for many things that we are trying to accomplish.”In addition to enjoying the performances, Gabrielian said she hopes attendees become aware of an ever-present issue of food inequality in the U.S.  “Music, and in particular chamber music, can be something that lifts you up. But also, pairing this concert with the Food Bank of Northern Indiana, we are also addressing the issue of inequality in our nation,” Gabrelian said. “15.6 million households were food insecure [in 2016] — this is 1 in 8 individuals and 1 in 6 children.“These numbers have been constant since 2015, which shows that this is an unresolved issue that is likely to worsen as public assistance to families in hardship diminishes. It’s easy to forget about these issues if you are not of the population that deals with it on a daily basis.”For those who are passionate about music and fighting poverty, Gabrielian said there are ways for people to get involved in future events. “Please invite your friends, get the word out, do your own bit to shed awareness of food insecurity in our community,” she said.Music for Food will be held Friday, Feb. 1 at 7:30 p.m. in Moreau Center for the Arts.Tags: chamber music, Food Bank of Northern Indiana, food insecure, music for foodlast_img read more

Read More →

John Dossett Enters Broadway’s Chicago

first_imgGive ‘em the old hocus pocus, Dossett! Tony nominee John Dossett begins performances in Chicago at Broadway’s Ambassador Theatre on January 19. He steps in for John O’Hurley as Billy Flynn, and will appear in the show through March 29. Dossett was most recently seen on Broadway as Charles in the revival of Pippin. He earned a Tony nomination for his performance as Herbie in Gypsy opposite Bernadette Peters. His additional Great White Way credits include Newsies, Mamma Mia!, Ragtime and Fifth of July. Chicago The current cast also includes Dylis Croman as Roxie Hart, Amra-Faye Wright as Velma Kelly, Raymond Bokhour as Amos Hart, NaTasha Yvette Williams as Matron “Mama” Morton and R. Lowe as Mary Sunshine. Beginning January 22, Chicago alum Charlotte d’Amboise will return to the show as Roxie for 14 performances only. As previously announced, Jennifer Nettles and Carly Hughes will join the company beginning February 2 as Roxie and Velma, respectively. View Comments Related Shows from $49.50last_img read more

Read More →

Rajiv Joseph’s Guards at the Taj Extends Off-Broadway

first_img Guards at the Taj The world premiere of Rajiv Joseph’s Guards at the Taj has extended off-Broadway through July 12; the production had been set to shutter on June 28. Directed by Amy Morton and starring Tony nominees Omar Metwally and Arian Moayed, the play officially opened on June 11 at Atlantic Theater Company at The Linda Gross Theater.In 1648 India, two Imperial Guards watch from their post as the sun rises for the first time on the newly-completed Taj Mahal—an event that shakes their respective worlds. When they are ordered to perform an unthinkable task, the aftermath forces them to question the concept of friendship, beauty and duty, and changes them forever.The production features scenic design by Timothy R. Mackabee, with costume design by Bobby Frederick Tilley II, lighting design by David Weiner, original music and sound design by Rob Milburn and Michael Bodeen, special effects design by Jeremy Chernick and fight direction by J. David Brimmer. View Comments Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on July 12, 2015last_img read more

Read More →

Take it Outside: 4 Tips for Climbing Real Rock

first_imgFor me, there are few things as rewarding as the days I spend outside climbing. Don’t get me wrong: I truly enjoy a good session of pulling plastic, but for me there is no substitute for real rock. When I first learned to climb in Kentucky in the early 90s, there was no indoor climbing option. A local quarry was my closest spot and I would spend hours top-roping the lines there crimping on the limestone edges and hoping that the crux flake wouldn’t rip off in my hand. It was not what you would describe as a sweet crag. Fortunately I had the Red River Gorge on the weekends and days off.So let’s consider some key features of climbing outside:Weather/ Nature: This one is probably the most obvious right? Take the time to check the weather for where you are climbing and bring the appropriate clothes to have fun and stay safe. Some of our approaches here in the Southeast are fairly short, and if it starts to dump rain or gets too cold it’s pretty easy to get back to the car and get warm and dry. It’s a good idea though to choose synthetic layers over cotton and have an extra warm layer with you. The temps can change quite a bit, especially up in the High Country around Boone and the Blue Ridge Parkway.Keeping a lightweight rain jacket in the pack is also a good idea. The ability to see and interact with the plants and animals is also a highlight for me, except when I get the seeping ooze of a poison ivy reaction or the joy of a wasp sting. Learn to identify hazardous plants and watch out for critters when you climb. We have two types of venomous snakes in the region including rattle snakes and copperheads. Just leave them be and give them some space.Climbing outside really requires you to use your senses and pay more attention to what’s around you. Watch where you step and where you sit things down. We also want to be cautious not to crush sensitive vegetation.On that note there is a climbing and conservation workshop scheduled 11/16/17 at Black Dome in Asheville. Go check it out if you’re in the area. Also remember to wear sunscreen and be UV aware.Actual Rock versus Plastic: The variation of rock types we have in the region is fantastic. From the tremendous range of quartzite in areas like the Linville Gorge, to the amazing swaths of granite at places like Looking Glass and Cedar Rock, the state of North Carolina has some great options. Sandstone meccas like the Red River Gorge, the New River Gorge, the Obed, and Chattanooga are stellar places to explore as well.From finger locks, to pinches, slopers, bullet hard edging, and airy arettes, there is no shortage of variety. Holds can break though and things can be knocked off or dropped from above. Wearing a helmet is a fantastic choice. The comfort and range of styles available in helmets now is the best it’s ever been.Ropes/ Pads: This is another fairly obvious one. Outdoor climbing areas are not as engineered as an indoor gym. Take the time to get to know the beta about an area as much as possible before you go or be prepared to scout things out. For bouldering a big one is figure out ahead of time how you get down if it’s a top out. Learn the best techniques for using pads and spotters. Plan where you want them and how you are going to ask the spotter to move or adjust the pads as you climb. Remember, every bouldering fall is a ground fall and the ground outside is not naturally padded. With setting up top ropes be sure you have learned your systems for anchor construction and know how to keep yourself safe when you are setting up.I have a good friend who stumbled while setting up ropes at the Chimneys near Table Rock and the tether that they were using likely saved them a serious accident. You’ve likely heard this before, but please make sure you run the rope through your carabiners as part of your anchor and avoid top roping directly off ring type anchors. The person who replaces and maintains them will thank you.That touches on fixed gear. A good gym regularly inspects and maintains it’s equipment. Outside that job falls on you. Inspect bolts or other fixed gear before committing to it. When I come across fixed slings I look at them and feel them trying to visually inspect the entire loop. You can often rotate the webbing to get a look at the section behind the tree or rock. Cary a small knife and extra cord or webbing to replace worn slings. Make sure you tie the knots correctly and check the knots on fixed stuff. I have seen many a poorly/incorrectly tied fisherman’s.Ethics/ Courtesy: Different climbing areas have some slight variations in norms and what the community generally expects in terms of acceptable behaviors. Check with locals if you are new to an area. As a new climber you might find yourself committing a climbing party foul. I hope that the folks around you point it out nicely. Climbers in general are an awesome bunch of people, but we also tend to have some strong opinions about how our resources should be treated and what “Best Practices” in climbing means.If you’re excited about climbing outdoors, then take the time to do some research and learn how to be a good community member and steward in advance. Get involved with your local climbing organization such as the Carolina Climbers Coalition or Southeastern Climbers Coalition. They will often organize fun and educational events as well as opportunities to volunteer.Happy climbing, and I hope to see you out there.Adrian Hurst is a Fox Mountain Guides AMGA Single Pitch Instructor, North Carolina Outward Bound Climbing Specialist, Wilderness First Responder, and member of the Appalachian Mountain Rescue Team.last_img read more

Read More →

Brazilian Army Team Takes Second Place in Army Ten-Miler

first_img On October 9, the Brazilian Army running team participated in the 27th Annual Army Ten-Miler race, organized by the U.S. Army. The event, which took place in Washington, D.C., attracted more than 30,000 runners, both civilian and military, from different countries. During the race, participants ran past locations in the U.S. capital which are recognized around the world, such as the Pentagon, Arlington Cemetery, the Washington Monument, the Capitol building, and the White House, among others. The Brazilian representatives finished the competition in second place (3 hours, 16 minutes, 9 seconds), behind the U.S. team (3 hours, 16 minutes, 5 seconds). The six athletes from the Brazilian Army Sports Commission finished among the top 15 competitors. The Army Ten-Miler race is the most important event of its kind organized by the U.S. Army and one of the largest 16-kilometer races in the world. By Dialogo October 19, 2011last_img read more

Read More →

3 reasons you make a lot but don’t bring home much

first_imgThe fact is, when we make more money, whether it’s a one-time bonus or an increase in salary, we spend more. Many of us think making more gives us the freedom to be less careful in our financial decision-making. This is a huge mistake. Consider the following three reasons why although you think you’ll be bringing more home, your habits are keeping you from seeing an increase in income.You’re living a luxurious lifestyleYou’ve gotten a pay raise. Time to travel, right? Wrong! Don’t immediately book your ticket to Tahiti. Get your bearings first and figure out how you can best use your additional income. Instead of rushing out to buy a new car, consider more responsible ways to put your money to good use. The more thoughtful you are about your spending, the more you’ll appreciate having extra in the end.You’re overly generousYou’ve gotten a big bonus… so, drinks for everyone! Hold tight on forking out gifts and cash to others. Your heart is in the right place, but focus first on taking care of yourself and your loved ones. Be sure you’ve considered your child’s college savings or necessities you’ve needed but haven’t had the funds for. Being generous with others, whether it’s treating a parent or giving to a charitable cause, is a wonderful thing. Just make sure before you give, you plan accordingly for how it will affect your money moving forward.You’ve become carelessJust because you are making more money, doesn’t mean budgeting and saving should go out the window. There’s a reason why the wealthiest people in the world have advisors who help with their financial decision-making. When you get a bump in pay and have money on the mind it can be difficult to see past the dollar signs. Don’t get distracted by the extra zeros. Be smart and not rash when it comes to even the smallest purchases. Life is expensive and even extremely successful people can easily blow their money if they’re not careful. 69SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Wendy Moody Wendy Moody is a Senior Editor with CUInsight.com. Wendy works with the editorial team to help edit the content including current news, press releases, jobs and events. She keeps … Web: www.cuinsight.com Detailslast_img read more

Read More →