Quiet night Arctic ionospheric D region characteristics

first_imgVLF radio propagation recordings are used to determine the characteristics of the nighttime polar lower D region of the ionosphere. Recordings of both VLF phase and amplitude in the Arctic on days within ∼1‐2 weeks of the equinoxes enable their day‐to‐night changes to be determined. These changes are then combined with previously measured daytime polar D region characteristics to find the nighttime characteristics. The previously determined daytime characteristics were measured in the Arctic summer; the NRLMSISE atmosphere model is used to help determine the height change from daytime summer to daytime equinox (∼5 km lower). The principal path used was from the 16.4 kHz Norwegian transmitter JXN (67°N, 14°E) 1334 km northwards across the Arctic Ocean to Ny‐Ålesund (79°N, 12°E), Svalbard. Also used were the 2014‐km path from NRK (37.5 kHz, Grindavik, 64°N, Iceland) to Ny‐Ålesund, the 1655‐km path from JXN to Reykjavik (64°N, Iceland) and the 5302‐km path from JXN across the Arctic Ocean to Fairbanks (65°N) in Alaska. The night values of (the Wait parameters) H’ and β were found to average from ∼79 km at equinox down to 77 km near winter solstice (lower than the 85 km at low and mid‐latitudes by ∼7 km) and 0.6 km‐1 respectively. This lower height and its variability are shown to be consistent with the principal source of ionization being energetic electron precipitation.last_img read more

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UK: HMS Bulwark Hosts Battle of the Atlantic Reception

first_img View post tag: Bulwark UK: HMS Bulwark Hosts Battle of the Atlantic Reception View post tag: HMS Back to overview,Home naval-today UK: HMS Bulwark Hosts Battle of the Atlantic Reception May 28, 2013 View post tag: Navy Training & Education View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Naval View post tag: UKcenter_img View post tag: Defence View post tag: hosts Assault ship HMS Bulwark hosted the Battle of the Atlantic reception in Liverpool at the start of the commemorative long weekend.In attendance at the event were many survivors from the battle. The First Sea Lord, Admiral Sir George Zambellas was present along with Fleet Commander, Vice Admiral Philip Jones, and many other senior officers. Speeches were made by Captain Burns, the commanding officer of HMS Bulwark and the First Sea Lord, Admiral Sir George Zambellas. The reception gave current and former sailors the chance to swap stories and reflect on the past.Members of HMS Bulwark’s ship’s company and the Second Sea Lord, Vice Admiral David Steel CBE, spoke to veteran Rex Ayers during the Battle of the Atlantic (BOA) Reception. Rex Ayers found himself on the deck of HMS Lossie where he was a Lieutenant (signals officer). In this role he regularly found himself at the helm of the frigate as it rolled across the Atlantic on convoy escort missions.Now 97, he lives in Woolton Park, Liverpool, but recalls one particular encounter:“We were designated to pick up the survivors of a German U-boat that had sunk. The captain of the submarine was a most delightful man and I was assigned to look after him until Liverpool.”[mappress]Press Release, May 28, 2013; Image: Royal Navy View post tag: Atlantic View post tag: Defense View post tag: Battle View post tag: Reception Share this articlelast_img read more

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USCGC Alex Haley Back in Kodiak, Alaska

first_img Authorities View post tag: News by topic View post tag: back February 10, 2015 View post tag: Alaska View post tag: USCGC Alex Haley View post tag: americas View post tag: Navycenter_img View post tag: Naval The crew of US Coast Guard Cutter Alex Haley returned to Kodiak, Alaska, Sunday following a successful 70-day deployment patrolling more than 10,800 miles throughout the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands.Alex Haley, known as the “Bulldog of the Bering,” departed Kodiak on Dec. 1, 2014, and spent the last 70 days conducting law enforcement and community outreach operations in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands. During the deployment, Alex Haley’s crew performed 41 at sea domestic fisheries enforcement boardings and covered more than 5,000 square miles in search efforts for the sunken Korean fishing vessel 501 Oryong.Alex Haley is a 282-foot medium endurance cutter that routinely conducts operations in the Bering Sea, the Aleutian Islands and the Gulf of Alaska. These operations occur under the tactical control of the 17th Coast Guard District in Juneau.[mappress mapid=”15090″]Image: USCG Share this article Back to overview,Home naval-today USCGC Alex Haley Back in Kodiak, Alaska USCGC Alex Haley Back in Kodiak, Alaska View post tag: Kodiaklast_img read more

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HAAKE, DAMAEL

first_img44, passed away on February 26, 2017 at the Bayonne Medical Center. He was born in Jersey City and was a resident of Bayonne. He was a self employed mechanic. He was predeceased by his parents Joann and Richard Haake. Husband of Angela (nee: Soprano) Haake. Father of Damael Haake. Son-in-law of Gail Soprano. Also survived by poppa cheech Francisco Poplet. Funeral arrangements by S. FRYCZYNSKI & SON Funeral Home, 32-34 E. 22nd St.last_img

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Phish Debuts Pink Floyd’s “Great Gig”, Plays Insane “YEM” On This Date In 1993 [Listen]

first_imgSuffice to say, Phish enjoys playing in Colorado. From their earliest shows outside of Vermont in 1988 at The Roma and Fly Me to the Moon Cafe in Telluride to their now annual end of summer run at Dick’s Sporting Goods Park in Commerce City, Phish has played more than their fair share of exceptional Colorado shows.Today we look back at Phish’s outstanding performance at Western State College in Gunnison, CO in 1993. Beginning with a curve ball “Loving Cup” opener and a first set “Reba” featuring an “Indian War Dance” solo by Cameron McKinney on the keys, this show also includes top shelf bust outs of Lynyrd Skynyrd’s “The Ballad of Curtis Loew” (302 show gap), “Halley’s Comet” (474 show gap), a debut of Pink Floyd’s “The Great Gig In The Sky,” as well as a noteworthy “You Enjoy Myself” with a plenty of teases (“Owner of a Lonely Heart,” “Low Rider,” “Oye Como Va”) and a “Spooky Jam” sandwiched in between. This second set is a must-listen.Listen to the entire show recording from March 14, 1993 below:Setlist: Phish at Paul Wright Gym, Western State College, Gunnison, CO – 3/14/16Set I: Loving Cup > Foam, Guelah Papyrus, Sparkle, Stash, Paul and Silas > Sample in a Jar, Reba[1], Punch You In the Eye > Runaway JimSet II:  Halley’s Comet > David Bowie, The Ballad of Curtis Loew > You Enjoy Myself -> Spooky Jam -> You Enjoy Myself, Lifeboy, Rift, Big Ball Jam, The Great Gig in the Sky[2] > Hold Your Head Up, The Squirming CoilEncore: Memories[3], Sweet Adeline[3], Golgi Apparatus[1] Cameron McKinney played Indian War Dance solo on piano prior to the whistling portion of Reba and later sang part of the Reba chorus.[2] Phish debut.[3] Without microphones.[Setlist via phish.net]last_img read more

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Brooklyn Comes Alive Will Have “After Midnight” Tickets Available At All Doors

first_imgFull-day passes to Brooklyn Comes Alive are completely sold-out, but that doesn’t mean you can’t join in on some of the fun! Tomorrow night, a limited supply of venue-specific tickets will be available for $40 at Brooklyn Bowl, Music Hall of Williamsburg, and The Hall at MP. While tickets to one venue will not grant you access to the other two venues, you will be able to enjoy the music for the rest of the night at the venue you purchase a ticket for. With entertainment going through 3am, there’s plenty of time to catch the late-night shows.At The Hall at MP, Roosevelt Collier’s NY Get Down will feature Michael League (Snarky Puppy), Rob Compa (Dopapod), Eli Winderman (Dopapod), and Adrian Tramontano (Kung Fu) through a set of game-changing jams and deep cuts alike, from 12:00-1:30am. After that, Jason Hann is bringing an all-star group of musicians to join his NYC edition of the Rhythmatronix, featuring Oteil Burbridge (Dead & Co.), virtuoso guitarist Fareed Haque (Sting, Joe Zawinul, Garaj Mahal), keyboardist Todd Stoops (RAQ, Electric Beethoven), and Afrocuban drummer Raul Pineda (Chucho Valdez, Sintesis), from 1:45-3:15am.At the Brooklyn Bowl, The Nth Power will lead Oteil Burbridge, Kofi Burbridge (Tedeschi Trucks Band), Natalie Cressman (Trey Anastasio Band), Skerik, The Shady Horns (Ryan Zoidis & Eric “Benny” Bloom), Farnell Newton (trumpet), Danny Sadownick (percussion), and more through a tribute to Earth, Wind And Fire, from 11:30-1:30am. After that, DRKWAV featuring John Medeski, Adam Deitch, & Skerik will close the night, from 1:45-3:15am.At the Music Hall of Williamsburg, Manic Focus Presents: Let Us All Break Focus, featuring Borahm Lee (Break Science), Adam Deitch (Break Science, Lettuce), Brasstracks, Jesus Coomes (Lettuce), Aron Magner (The Disco Biscuits), Ty Coomes, and Todd Stoops (Electric Beethoven), from 11:45pm to 1:15am. After that, NYC’s own Horizon Wireless will close the night, blending psychedelic break-beat & house music with a variety of other styles including trip-hop, minimal tech-funk, and nu-jazz to create smooth, high energy, and live soulful dance experiences for fans of all genres of music. The band includes Teddy Midnight’s guitar virtuoso Willey Griffin, Lespecial’s low-end wizard Luke Bemand on bass, Daniel Scott Lyons behind the kit, and a rotating cast of keyboardists as well. Music ends at 3am.Don’t miss out on the incredible late-night festivities, and be sure to get to your desired venue by midnight to ensure entrance for $40. See you on Saturday!last_img read more

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Bringing Opportunity to OEMs

first_img Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 2:05Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVERemaining Time -2:05 Playback Rate1ChaptersChaptersdescriptions off, selectedDescriptionssubtitles off, selectedSubtitlescaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedCaptionsen (Main), selectedAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window.Caption Settings DialogBeginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsDefaultsDoneClose Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. How OEMS can Unlock New Revenue Streams by Leveraging Software Design and Monetizing Customer DataThanks to digital transformation, application workload continues to increase exponentially. As an OEM, you and your customers must be multi-cloud ready and capable of connecting as part of a system of intelligent systems. Having an architecture that can handle a massive amount of data is critical to success.In my view, a dual approach is the only way to go. Hyperconvergence integrates multiple system components into a single integrated turnkey solution while a software-defined storage array allows you to leverage a range of capabilities across different hardware platforms.This approach truly offers the best of both worlds, allowing you to build appliances to meet your customers’ needs across multiple vertical industries. Key benefits include increased resiliency and scalability.I believe that 2020 is a time of unprecedented opportunity for OEMs. With the right partner and architecture, you can develop innovative solutions to unlock new revenue streams and monetize customer data.Dell Technologies OEM | Embedded & Edge Solutions understand the complexities of the OEM marketplace and can help you innovate faster.If you’d like to learn more, please read this technical brief on why a software-defined approach is important for solution designers and watch the video below. Follow us on Twitter @delltechoem and join our LinkedIn Dell Technologies OEM | Embedded & Edge Solutions Showcase page here.last_img read more

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Fourteen Notre Dame dorms lack wheelchair accessibility

first_img“If a student would have a class in that building, we would move it to a different location,” he said. Howland said when he came to the University in the 1990s, the Mod Quad residence halls — Pasquerilla East, Pasquerilla West, Knott and Siegfried Hall — were the most physically accessible dorms. “Right when I started, they were building Keough and McGlinn and Welsh Family. Those were kind of the ideal, at that point, to place students in,” he said. “And Ryan Hall — the Ryan family was very interested in accessibility, so they ensured that a lot of things were put in place for Ryan that were fully accessible.” University architect Doug Marsh said the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), which was passed in 1990 and took effect in 1992, has facility and “built-environment” requirements. The state of Indiana also has separate accessible design criteria, and though the two codes are usually consistent, there are small differences. “Any building after 1992 is considered new construction and needs to be barrier-free,” he said. Jessica Ping is a freshman at Notre Dame who has CHILD syndrome, a limb and skin deficiency, and has only partial limbs on her left side. “In order to get around for long distances, I have to use a chair or a prosthetic, which I don’t use very often because of the skin thing. Most of the time, I just use the chair. I can hop short distances,” she said.  Ping lives in a quad in McGlinn Hall, but has her own room that has buttons allowing her to leave and enter more easily, as well as a shower with similar modifications. She will be living in the new women’s residence hall that will open in the fall of 2016. “Other than that, I’m not going to lie — McGlinn is supposedly one of the most accessible dorms, but I’ve had an awful time with it. It’s been really bad. The snow situation was just awful this year, with the parking lot out in front and nobody was willing to do anything about it. So that’s one thing I’m not happy with,” she said. Ping said the first snowfall of the year was on a Saturday night. “I was hungry, the dining hall was about to close, but my rector said I wouldn’t be able to get out. She was right, I got stuck, had to be pushed back in,” she said. “Long story short, we ended up calling NDSP to see if they could give me a ride in one of the cop cars to the dining hall, and they just threw a fit about it. They were so rude to myself, my roommates and my rector. They were unbelievably terrible to deal with and I didn’t try ever again with them. “But I did keep in contact with the disability services on campus and was like, ‘Hey, I’m having issues with the snow, can you fix it?’ And they always tried to word it in a way like they were really sorry, but they weren’t going to fix it,” she said.Marsh said the University has also worked to identify barriers in buildings that were constructed before 1992 and create a program to remove those barriers. Notre Dame’s historic campus, with more than 100 buildings constructed before 1992, presents unique challenges. For example, Alumni Hall, a men’s residence hall constructed in 1931, is sunk in the ground and has a “mid-level” entry. “They do each have those ramped entrances so people can get on the main level, but again, there’s the chapel, now has three steps down to step into.” he said. “You remove as many barriers as physically possible, but some just aren’t achievable.” Ping said the lack of working elevators in other residence halls, like Lyons, has kept her from being able to visit friends in their own dorms.“I can hop up the stairs, but I don’t feel comfortable, especially at night, leaving my chair outside for any passerby to mess around with,” she said. Megan Crowley, a freshman in Ryan Hall with Pompe disease, which progressively weakens muscles, said she specifically looked at wheelchair accessibility when she was visiting college campuses as a prospective student. Editor’s note: Crowley spoke to The Observer with the assistance of her nurse, Debbie Larsen, who is quoted below.“Some of the colleges were not accessible, so those got crossed off the list. Notre Dame was one of the ones that was really accommodating to her,” Larsen said.  Crowley said she has a parking space for her wheelchair-accessible van and special access to closer spaces for some buildings. She also has her own room in Ryan Hall. “Because she needs her own shower, she has a nurse twenty-four hours a day with her, and she needed the space as well for all the equipment and to accommodate her needs,” Larsen said. “The room is just amazing because it has a shower, it has access to water, she has a remote that opens the dorm doors. It opens the main doors for her and it also opens her own dorm room so she can get in and out.” Crowley said she is bothered by the fact that she might not be able to attend an event on campus because not all the buildings are wheelchair-accessible. “… But at this point in her life, she’s accepted that there are going to be places that she can’t access and, if they can fix it, that’s great,” Larsen said. “But she does understand that some of these buildings are very old and they can’t be fixed. It’s not realistic for her to expect that everything in her life is going to be easy, and that everyone’s going to be able to accommodate her needs, and she understands that and is fine with that.” Marsh said the University considers the requirements set forth by ADA and state codes to be minimums, and tries to exceed those minimums “in several key areas,” including ramp design. While ramps are allowed to have “about an 8.3 percent” slope, ramps on the University’s new construction aim to have a maximum slope of five percent. “It’s a big difference,” he said.”What these codes, and the ADA architectural provisions allow, is you to remove the railing because it’s such a subtle slope you don’t necessarily need it. From an aesthetic standpoint it doesn’t bring all this attention to the ramp, it’s just a subtle incline — you don’t need so many landings along the way. And, it’s more importantly, easier for people negotiate, depending on their disability.” Transitions in floor material, such as going from carpet to tile, or vinyl to tile or a wood floor, is another issue the University tries to be cognizant of in new construction, Marsh said.  “Again, speaking with people who’ve endured these challenges, those transitions, even allowed, can be jarring or, depending on their condition, quite painful,” he said. “Ryan Hall was the first of its kind to have a no vertical floor transitions.“We established different floor levels in the subfloor when we built the building, anticipating that the carpet is going to be this thick, but the tile is going to be this thick — we make the adjustment, so that when you roll across, or even if you’re walking but maybe have a malady that makes you drag your foot, it’s not a trip hazard to you. That’s not easy to do, but that’s our goal, to have a zero-transition change between flooring materials.” The Department of Justice also issued updated requirements for accessible design in 2010, but these changes were “fairly subtle,” Marsh said. “They didn’t change universal kinds of things, more dimensional, like the bathroom clearances changed. … It’s a matter of a few inches, but it’s important when you try to negotiate in a tight space,” he said. “Again it’s an area that we’re trying to make sure that restrooms and other small activity spaces, access to your offices are appropriate beyond the minimum, so if that change happens again, in the future, you don’t have that challenge.” News writer Megan Valley contributed to this story. Tags: accessibility, disability, Disability series 2016, Office of Disability Services, Sara Bea Center for Students with Disabilities Editor’s note: This is the fourth day in a series on disability at Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s. Today’s stories focus on student experiences with physical accessibility at the College and University.Lindsey Meyers | The Observer Scott Howland, coordinator in the office of Disability Services, said all current academic buildings are accessible for students with physical disabilities, aside from Riley Hall, which is home to the art, art history and design department.last_img read more

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White Nose Syndrome

first_imgDriving along the Blue Ridge Parkway on an overcast New Year’s Day, Luke Appling, a park ranger at Grandfather Mountain State Park, saw a very strange sight: a bat flying in the middle of the day. The bat’s flight was clumsy and uncoordinated, as it flew into nearby branches. Appling knew something was wrong with this bat.Bats flying during the daytime are becoming a common and widespread phenomenon in western North Carolina. Sightings have been called in from rangers at Grandfather Mountain, hikers in Mills River, and staff at the Waynesville Water Treatment Plant. This odd behavior is a side-effect of a disease called White-nose Syndrome (WNS). WNS is caused by a newly discovered fungus called Geomyces destructans, which thrives in the cold, damp climates of caves and mines. As bats hibernate, their immune systems are suppressed and their body temperature falls within a degree of the surrounding temperature of the cave. This makes the bats a perfect host for G. destructans to grow on. The fungus actively invades exposed living skin tissue on areas such as the wings, muzzle, ears, and feet of the bats. The bats awake more frequently from hibernation to groom off the fungus, using up precious fat reserves that should last the entire winter. As a result, bats may wake up and fly outside in search of food and water. But when bats exit their hibernacula in the middle of winter, they find freezing temperatures and very few insects to eat.WNS is a particularly devastating disease due to its rapid spread, lack of discrimination between different bat species, and catastrophically high mortality rates. WNS was discovered in Howe’s Cave in New York State in the winter of 2006 and has since spread to 16 states in the eastern U.S. and 4 Canadian Provinces, currently reaching its most southern extent in North Carolina. Mortality from WNS was recently estimated to be over 5.5 million bats since 2006, with regional population declines estimated at 73-88%. Six species of bats are confirmed to be affected by the disease, including the federally endangered Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis). The northern long-eared bat (Myotis septentrionalis), the eastern small-footed bat (Myotis leibii), and the little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus) are currently being considered for listing under the Endangered Species Act due to declines as a result of WNS. The little brown bat was once considered the most common bat species in the Northeast, but this species’ population has declined so drastically from WNS that biologists believe that little brown bats could be regionally extinct from the Northeast in less than 16 years.In 2009, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service issued a voluntary moratorium on caving in WNS positive states and adjacent states to prevent human transportation of G. destructans spores. “We are asking people not to enter caves and mines while researchers work to learn more about White-nose Syndrome,” says Sue Cameron, an Endangered Species Biologist for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). “While the primary mode of transmission of the disease appears to be from bat-to-bat, there is concern that people can inadvertently carry and spread fungal spores to new sites.  We want to do whatever we can to slow the spread of the disease and prevent large jumps to uninfected states or areas of the country.  If people do choose to enter caves and mines, we ask that they follow the USFWS decontamination protocols (http://www.fws.gov/whitenosesyndrome/pdf/WNSDecon_Cavers_v012511.pdf) to reduce the chance of spreading the spores.”  Many caves and mines on federal and state lands have been closed to the public, although some privately-owned caves are still open. Local caving groups, such as the Flittermouse Grotto, follow USFWS decontamination protocol to prevent spreading spores between caving sites. Linville Caverns, a site that was confirmed as WNS positive in 2011, requires visitors to decontaminate their shoes after they leave the cave.WNS was first discovered in North Carolina last winter in February 2011 and it has now been documented in 4 counties, with 2 additional counties considered suspect for the disease.  Winter bat hibernation surveys for the 2012 season have not yet been completed, but the NCWRC biologists are already seeing indications of declines in the number of bats hibernating in some of the state’s caves and mines. “Folks were holding on to a little bit of hope that White-nose Syndrome would behave differently in the south,” says Cameron. “We are hoping that something about our climate or our bats would curtail the high mortality rates seen in the Northeast. But unfortunately, reports from biologists in Virginia and our recent winter surveys in North Carolina suggest that our bats may be just as unlucky as their cousins up north.”“White-nose Syndrome is the most devastating wildlife disease of our time,” states Gabrielle Graeter, a Wildlife Biologist with the NCWRC’s Wildlife Diversity Program. “We are still hopeful that we won’t see the declines in our bat populations that biologists up North have seen. Unfortunately, there isn’t much we can do to help the bats right now other than monitor the spread of the disease and hope for the best.”Corinne Diggins is a NCWRC Wildlife Diversity Technician and head of the North Carolina Bat Acoustic Monitoring Program. She has been monitoring North Carolina’s bat populations since 2010.Help the NCWRC Monitor Bat PopulationsIf you see bats flying during the day or roosting in areas exposed to the elements during the winter, please write down the date, time, location, # of bats and their behavior, and the weather conditions and email them to Gabrielle Graeter at [email protected] monitor bats this summer with the North Carolina Bat Acoustic Monitoring Program! As a volunteer, you’ll place a microphone for an ultrasonic bat detector on the roof of your car and drive along a predetermined route, recording bat calls. Contact Corinne Diggins for more information at 828-273-3991 or [email protected] to the NCWRC’s Nongame and Endangered Wildlife Fund: The Nongame and Endangered Wildlife Fund helps fund the conservation of bats and monitoring of White-nose Syndrome in the state of North Carolina. Donations can be made through: 1) donating through the Tax Check-off for Nongame and Endangered Wildlife on your N.C. State Income tax form, 2) registering a vehicle or trailer with a N.C. Wildlife Conservation license plate, or 3) mailing in a contribution form, which can be downloaded at ncwildlife.org/give.last_img read more

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Matz: Don’t break up big banks

first_img 12SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr In an op-ed piece published in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch April 10, NCUA Chairman Debbie Matz laid out her reasons for keeping big banks in their current form, noting these reasons are spelled out in the Dodd-Frank Act.Matz wrote that breaking up big banks is not the right answer, given the current economic climate. Breaking up big banks puts the progress made by the Financial Stability Oversight Council and other federal regulators at risk, she argued.Through the Dodd-Frank Act, regulators were given new powers to monitor the health of financial institutions, she said. Those powers aimed to reduce threats to the financial system by raising capital requirements for big banks, as well as restricting certain high-risk practices and unwinding failing institutions. continue reading »last_img read more

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