DeMarcus Cousins Just Epically Trolled Fox Sports’ Clay Travis

first_imgJohn Calipari gives instructions to DeMarcus Cousins.LEXINGTON, KY – FEBRUARY 13: John Calipari the Head Coach of the Kentucky Wilcats talks with DeMarcus Cousins #15 during the SEC game against the Tennessee Volunteers on February 13, 2010 at Rupp Arena in Lexington, Kentucky. (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)Update: Giving credit where credit is due. Travis had a fantastic response to Cousins’ post – he’s going to donate $5,000 to the charity of the NBA star’s choice. Good on him for turning this into a positive [email protected] Funny and well played. $5k to your charity of choice. Let me know where to send it.— Clay Travis (@ClayTravisBGID) January 30, 2015Earlier: Sacramento Kings center DeMarcus Cousins, one of the best players in the NBA, can certainly lose his cool from time to time on the court. But off the court, his record is as clean as it gets. That comes as a surprise to at least one reporter – Fox Sports’ Clay Travis – who predicted five years ago that Cousins was going to be arrested at least once by now. Friday, Cousins took to Instagram to post a screenshot of Travis’ 2010 claim – which came after Kentucky beat Vanderbilt back during Cousins’ only year in Lexington. Cousins wants his followers to let Travis know how wrong he wound up being.Well played, DeMarcus. We have a feeling that a lot of people in both Lexington and Sacramento are going to let Travis know what they think about his prediction.last_img read more

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Magic Johnson Leads Panel At Fifth Annual Ladylike Day At UCLA

first_imgLadylike Foundation hosted its Fifth Annual Ladylike Day at UCLA on Saturday, December 17th.Magic Johnson Attends 5th Annual Ladylike DayLadylike Day at UCLA is a program of classes that promotes and educates young ladies between the ages of 12-17 from L.A.’s inner city in the areas of Finance, fashion, health and fitness, etiquette, job interviewing and preparing for their future. Cookie Johnson opened the day, welcoming the young ladies and encouraging them to be the best that they can be.Each year, Ladylike Day at UCLA culminates with an open platform celebrity male panel where the young ladies attending are given the opportunity to ask the men on the panel any questions they wish without any restrictions or limitations, from advice about romance and relationships to how to handle bullying. This year, the panel was lead by Magic Johnson, and included Devon Franklin, Film Producer/Author/Motivational Speaker; Chris Spencer, Actor/Comedian and Creator of Real Husbands of Hollywood; Marcellus Wiley, NFL Veteran & ESPN Broadcaster/Analyst; Dondre Whitfield, Emmy-nominated actor and star on OWN Network’s Queen Sugar; and a surprise guest panelist, recent SAG and Golden Globe nominee, Anthony Anderson.Founded by Leah Pump, the LadyLike Foundation is a faith-based nonprofit organization whose purpose is to educate, empower and inspire young women living in underprivileged communities. Through cutting edge resource programs, workshops, mentorships and life lessons, young ladies are challenged to reach their highest potential and become the successful, well-rounded “Lady” they were created to be. Each year, the organization hosts two main events: LADYLIKE DAY AT UCLA and the Women of Excellence Awards Luncheon, which is the primary fundraiser for LadyLike Foundation. For more information, please visit www.theladylike.com.last_img read more

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Executive director of MMIWG inquiry stepping down

first_imgAPTN NewsThe controversial executive director of the national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls is stepping down.Sources say the news broke at a staff team-building event in Toronto this week.Debbie Reid was hired in October as the second executive director of the two-year MMIWG inquiry.She came in with a heavy hand under a mandate to clean up an under-performing team and fired several people. More employees resigned in protest.Reid is from Skownan First Nation in Manitoba. She is said to be leaving for personal reasons.Debbie ReidThis brings to 21 the number of employees that have left the federal inquiry as it criss-crosses the country hearing from families and survivors of violence against Indigenous women and girls.Its operation, with a budget of $53.8 million, has been roundly criticized – leading to the resignation of the first executive director and one of five commissioners.So far it has hosted eight public hearings; one is scheduled for Yellowknife later this month.Reid was vocal on Twitter at the start of her tenure, posting about throwing off the chains of government bureaucracy and blasting the work of an APTN reporter as “irresponsible.”She was known for quoting an army general in her emails but recently she dialled back her online presence. She surfaced briefly in Maliotenam, Que., where she contradicted a commissioner on whether the inquiry would host a hearing in Montreal.last_img read more

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Were not going to give up Cowichan families hold out hope for

first_imgCullen CrozierAPTN InvestigatesMonica Patsy Jones carefully places a stack of missing persons posters on the passenger seat of her vehicle.She turns the engine over and begins her daily routine that takes her through the Cowichan reserve and into the City of Duncan B.C.“We’ve had family drive up and down the island with posters and put them all on every gas station, any store, wherever we could go,” Jones says.“We put posters up and try to get it out there that we’re still searching.”The posters are of Jones’ three nephews; Desmond Peter, Ian Henry and Everett Jones.Over the last 12 years, all three men have vanished without a trace from the Cowichan Valley on Vancouver Island.“It’s been a real tough go,” Jones says, turning onto the busy highway that divides communities.“The not knowing is the hardest part, the not knowing of where they are, who they’re with. You know people don’t just disappear.”Jones is no stranger to family tragedy.Her older sister Catherine Teresa Joe was only 27 years old when she went missing from Duncan in January of 1977.“She was friendly to everybody,” Jones recalls. “She helped everybody, she brought the joy into sadness.”Jones was just a young girl at the time but still remembers the toll her sister’s disappearance had on their family and the small tight knit community.“Everyone was worried,” Jones says. “We couldn’t talk about her without tears in our eyes, it just broke our hearts because it hurt so much.”(Catherine Teresa Joe “Every day there was people calling saying they seen her here,” says her old sister)The family received a number of possible sighting over the next few months but nothing was confirmed.Her older sister, Helen Joe, still remember the sinking feeling every time the phone rang.“Every day there was people calling saying they seen her here, they seen her there,” Joe recalls. “And my brothers and uncles and dad would go out and look for her.“They’d always come back empty handed.”The family was still searching for Cathy Joe six months later, when a hiker found her body in a ditch in North Cowichan, less than 10 kilometres from her front door.She had been raped and murdered.“I just remember everybody being there and just sitting there crying because it’s not the answer we wanted,” Jones says.“It was a day that turned our lives upside down and our lives were never the same after.”The case is still unsolved but the family has never stopped searching for answers.It’s part of the reason that Jones has taken such a lead role in helping to locate her missing nephews.“You know we want answers, we want closure,” Jones says. “You know our parents went to their graves without closure and we want someone accountable for taking our sister’s life.“We want answers on who took our nephews.”(Peter Joe, left, Helen Joe, Monica Patsy Jones. Photo: Cullen Crozier/APTN)Desmond Peter was 14 years old when he went missing on March 12, 2007.His mother, Elizabeth Louie, was the last person to see him walking along the highway that cuts through Duncan.“I don’t understand how he could just disappear,” Louie says. “Somebody knows something.”Louie still passes the busy intersection nearly every day – it’s hard not to. It’s less than five minutes from their family home.“When I first start driving around, I couldn’t go anywhere without crying,” Louie says. “Everywhere I go I’m still looking, I’m always looking for him.”According to Monica Patsy Jones, the RCMP labeled Desmond Peter as just another runaway and for the first two weeks he was missing – she says there was little effort made to find him by the authorities.“They really had him categorized as a runaway child,” Jones says. “And they kept telling them, he wouldn’t do that. That he always checked in with them and you know he always made his way home.”(“I don’t understand how he could just disappear,” says Elizabeth Louie of her son Desmond. Photo: Cullen Crozier/APTN)Ian Henry was 26 years old when he went missing on August 21, 2015.Henry was suffering from schizophrenia at the time he disappeared.Because of his condition and his tendency to wander, family members didn’t realize he was missing at first and there was some confusion as to when he was last seen.“My kids were so hurt,” Henry’s mother Phyliss remembers. “They kept phoning me and calling me and I wouldn’t respond right away because I was so hurt and lost at the time.“I couldn’t even take it.”The family banded together and organized searches throughout the community with no luck. They were also displeased with the response efforts made by the local authorities.“Search and rescue didn’t do a search until maybe over a month, almost two months after he was reported missing,” Henry’s cousin Joeldine Allen remembers.“So, I don’t feel like the urgency was taken with care.”(“My kids were so hurt,” says Phyliss Henry about her Ian when he disappeared. Photo: Cullen Crozier/APTN)Everett Jones was 47 year old went missing on February 10, 2016.Jones was born with cognitive disabilities and had a daily routine that took him through the City of Duncan.When he didn’t return home his mother Myra Charlie knew that something wasn’t right.“I kept hoping that he would come home, some miracle he’d come home,” Charlie says. “But also I had that dreadful feeling that something terrible happened to my son.”Jones would often be seen walking through town, greeting local merchants as he made his rounds.It’s a path his older brother Eric has walked many times since the day he went missing.“I often wonder what became? What happened? Did anybody see him? Does anybody know where perhaps he could be?” Jones says. “Of course we’ve asked all around the community.“He was very well liked in the community by the people that did know him.”The family believed that Jones might have fallen and injured himself and was unable to call for help.The RCMP along with search and rescue conducted land, air and water searches for weeks but nothing turned up. (Myra Charlie: “I kept hoping that he would come home, some miracle he’d come home.” Photo: Cullen Crozier/APTN)Some community members believe that the disappearances are connected and there are similarities.All three men were Cowichan Tribe members and known to wander around the community.Both Ian Henry and Everett Jones had mental health issues and both disappeared within five months of each other.There is a growing fear that the men were preyed upon.“It brings a lot of heartache, a lot of anger,” says Cowichan Tribes member Mary Jim. “It brings me back to the day that my daughter Tyeshia went missing.”Mary Jim’s daughter, Tyeshia Jones, was only 18-years-old when she went missing on January 22, 2011.“She was good hearted. She loved everybody equal, no one less.” Jim remembers.“She was outgoing, loved to dance, she had a real heart of gold.”(Tyeshia Jones. Photo courtesy: Mary Jim)The day she went missing was like any other Jim says.When her daughter said goodbye, Jim didn’t realize it would be for the last time.“I gave her a kiss and a hug, not knowing that they would be the last I ever received from her.” Jim says.When the next day came and Jim still hadn’t heard from her daughter, she started to worry.They usually kept in touch and it wasn’t like Tyeshia to not answer her calls.Jim contacted the local RCMP detachment and that night they started to search the community for her.The family was still searching six days later when they got the news they had been dreading.“We were out searching, calling her name when the RCMP told me that they believed they found her,” Jim remembers. “I didn’t want to believe it. They asked if I wanted to go home and I said no, I want to keep searching.“So the RCMP just left us there.”When Jim returned home that night, she says that reality slowly started to sink in.Her daughter had been murdered.Tyeshia Jones’ killer was eventually caught and sentenced to life in prison.It’s a fact that has brought little comfort to the family.“Justice for me would be for the killer to go through what he put my daughter through, that’s justice,” Jim says. “Right now he’s getting his three meals and family can visit him in prison – I can’t do that for my daughter.“I have to go see her at her grave site.”(Mary Jim with her son LaTrell Jim. Photo: Cullen Crozier/APTN)We reached out to the RCMP for comment and updates on the cases of Desmond Peter, Ian Henry and Everett Jones but were told that they weren’t able to provide us with anyone to speak with.In an e-mailed statement to APTN Investigates, the RCMP gave little information.“There is nothing to indicate that these files are related in any way. The North Cowichan/Duncan RCMP remains committed to finding answers for the families. The investigations remain open and active,” the statement says. “The public is once again encouraged to bring forward any information that might assist.”Monica Patsy Jones carefully places a small bouquet of flowers on the grave of her sister, Catherine Teresa Joe.She is buried in a small cemetery that overlooks the Cowichan reserve.Her death and the disappearances of Desmond Peter, Ian Henry and Everett Jones are still felt throughout the community.The families still hold on to the hope that they might one day find answers.“I carry a prayer in my heart that we’ll bring them home and we’re not going to give up until we bring them home,” Jones says. “However long it takes and however long it take to find out who did this to my sister.“We’re not going to give up.”(Valerie Bob, left, Sylvia Alphonse, Monica Patsy Jones. Photo: Cullen Crozier/APTN)Anyone with information on the murder of Catherine Teresa Joe or the disappearances of Desmond Peter, Ian Henry or Everett Jones are asked to contact the North Cowichan Duncan RCMP at 250-748-5522 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS)[email protected]@cullencrozierlast_img read more

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MMIWG commissioner visits Winnipeg one last time as national inquiry wraps up

first_imgBrittany HobsonAPTN NewsFamily members of Winnipeg’s missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls came together to stand hand in hand with commissioner Michéle Audette in what would mark the end of the national inquiry but more importantly mark the beginning of healing for many involved.Audette was in the city Tuesday for a community forum on the inquiry’s final report released last week.“You just shook a country,” Audette told the crowd. “Now the entire world knows that you are here, that you matter.”The day was an emotional one.Audette acknowledged the process wasn’t always easy for family members.“If I failed you I’m sorry,” the commissioner said fighting back tears. “There’s thousands of people that believe that a country failed our loved ones.“I know the movement created this…I’m so proud of you.”Over the course of the nearly three-year long inquiry commissioners heard from more than 2,300 families and survivors.Audette heard from some of those families again during the community forum.Among them was Isabel Daniels.She’s happy the Inquiry is over.“It was a two-year process of being stuck in grief and bereavement,” she said.(Isabel Daniels told the inquiry about her cousin Nicole Daniels. Photo: Brittany Hobson/APTN)Daniels testified during the Winnipeg hearings in October 2017.She shared the story of Nicole Daniels, her cousin, who was found dead in April 2009 at the age of 16.Police had concluded Daniels froze to death and closed her case after autopsy results showed alcohol as a contributing factor in her death.It’s a conclusion the family has never acceptedPrior to her death, Daniels had met up with an older man after connecting with him through a dating service.The family believes the man supplied Nicole with alcohol and left her for dead.As the public moves to act on the inquiry’s 231 calls to justice, Daniels urges governments to invest in mental health and addiction supports for women.But she says First Nations leadership also needs to step up as well.“I would like to see them take the bull by the horns and guide our communities for people that are struggling in our First Nations communities,” said Daniels.On Monday, Audette visited the city of Thompson in Northern Manitoba for a separate community forum.The Inquiry hosted hearings in March 2018 after hearing concerns from northern families.She said it was important to finish her tenure as commissioner by revisiting communities in the province.“Families from here were very vocal [and] very strong,” said Audette.“It’s important that I come back and make that closure with them.”Commissioners will be traveling to Saskatoon, Whitehorse and Toronto this week for similar presentations, Audette said.For Daniels, her experience with the Inquiry has come full circle.Now that it’s done she calls on families to support each other so they can move forward.“We’ve been grieving long enough. I think it’s time we try to find a way to live.”[email protected]@bhobs22last_img read more

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The Latest Brexit Portugal backs Spain on Gibraltar clause

first_imgBRUSSELS — The Latest on Brexit negotiations (all times local):2:20 p.m.Portugal’s foreign minister is in support of the Brexit deal including Spain’s request to have its say on the future of the disputed British territory of Gibraltar.Foreign Minister Augusto Santos Silva says that the original Brexit guidelines laid out last year that included assurances to Spain that it could deal with London directly on the issue of Gibraltar were “wise.”Spain said Friday it wouldn’t back the divorce deal U.K. and European Union leaders are supposed to vote on during Sunday’s summit in Brussels after language regarding Gibraltar didn’t appear in a draft agreement.Santos Silva says the impasse has an “easy resolution because the heads of state of the 27 had already agreed (.) that any agreement between the U.K. and the EU regarding Gibraltar would require previous agreement from Spain, and that appears to be a very wise line.”___11:05 a.m.British Prime Minister Theresa May is kicking off a big Brexit weekend as she travels to the European Union headquarters in Brussels for talks on Saturday with key leaders.Spanish objections over the status of Gibraltar — the tiny territory ceded to Britain in 1713 but is still claimed by Spain — is the only dispute left hanging ahead of Sunday’s summit of EU leaders.May will meet with EU Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker and Council President Donald Tusk in the evening.May hopes to leave Brussels on Sunday with a firm agreement on the withdrawal terms for Britain’s departure from the EU on March 29, as well as a comprehensive negotiating text on how future relations should look like once both sides agree on a trade agreement.The Associated Presslast_img read more

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Filing Utility could face charges in California wildfires

first_imgSACRAMENTO, Calif. — California’s attorney general has told a federal judge it’s possible the state’s largest power utility, Pacific Gas & Electric Co., could face charges up to murder if investigators find reckless operation of power equipment caused any deadly wildfires in the past two years.The Sacramento Bee reports the brief is purely advisory, and any criminal charges would most likely be filed by county district attorneys, not the state.The opinion was submitted to a judge overseeing a criminal case involving a PG&E natural gas pipeline explosion that killed eight people in the San Francisco suburb of San Bruno in 2010.PG&E was convicted of violating federal pipeline safety laws, and the judge asked for the attorney general’s opinion on whether any wildfires constitute a probation violation.The company has until Monday to file its response.___Information from: The Sacramento Bee, http://www.sacbee.comThe Associated Presslast_img read more

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RCMP continue to investigate disappearance of Grande Prairie man

first_imgGRANDE PRAIRIE, A.B. – Grande Prairie RCMP say they are continuing to investigate the disappearance of 33-year-old Patrick Decque.According to RCMP, they believe that the circumstances surrounding Decque’s disappearance are suspicious and that he may have been the victim of foul play.Police say Decque was last seen on May 23 in the Pinnacle Ridge neighbourhood of Grande Prairie. Decque is described as:CaucasianBlack hairBrown eyes6’0” / 230 lbsLast seen wearing a grey suitAnyone with information regarding Decque’s disappearance is being asked to contact the Grande Prairie RCMP at 780-830-5701 or CrimeStoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS.last_img read more

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Canada Immigration Procedures Leave a Moroccan Away From his Wife and

first_imgTaroudant, Morocco- Moroccan Abderrahim Chakir has been waiting since 2008 to join his Canadian wife Karla Piedrasanta and his son Amin, 19 months, whom he has never met.The couple were faced with a set of bureaucratic procedures that kept them apart, starting from delaying their marriage to turning down Chakir’s application to obtain a permanent visa to Canada.“Every year we hope we will be together. We are doing everything we can to comply with the application process. My husband is missing our son growing up,” said Chakir’s wife, Karla Piedrasanta. However, the Citizenship and Immigration Canada has other plans. They said the process was delayed because officials, in May 2012, “discovered that (Chakir) may have a medical condition that could pose a risk to the health and safety of Canadians, and would make him inadmissible to Canada.”“It was determined that Mr. Chakir has a medical condition that requires treatment. CIC has informed Mr. Chakir that once he can demonstrate that he has received treatment and that his condition no longer poses a risk to the Canadian public, CIC will reassess his medical file and his application,” a department spokesperson was quoted by The Star as saying.Contrary to what Canada Citizenship and Immigration said, Chakir’s wife said that her husband has no health complication that could impose a risk on Canadians’ health.“He did all the blood work and saliva tests. He didn’t have TB and he doesn’t have TB,” she noted said.After more than three years struggling to join his wife and son in Canada, Chakir said that he is “extremely depressed.”“This is a really long process. I just feel down all the time. I have missed a lot of great moments of being with my wife and our son,” he said.In its attempt to stand against false marriages “marriage of convenience”, the Citizenship and Immigration Canada has hired trained officers that can recognize real immigration applications.“Canadian citizens or permanent residents who are in a marriage of convenience for immigration reasons may be charged with a crime,” according to Citizenship and Immigration Canada© Morocco World News. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, rewritten or redistributedlast_img read more

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Can YOU Fix The NBA Draft

By Jody Avirgan The NBA draft could use some fixing. Whether NBA Commissioner Adam Silver admits it or not, teams are tanking in order to land a better chance at a top pick. On the most recent episode of our sports podcast Hot Takedown, we discussed a few proposals to fix the draft structure, from the “wheel” to closing the gap between the worst and second-worst team’s chances. Now, it’s your turn.When you’re sitting on your couch, daydreaming, what crazy scheme have you come up with to fix the draft structure? Tell us below — no idea is too weird. We’ll compile some of them on FiveThirtyEight and discuss our favorites on the show.We’ll also endorse one idea as the official Hot Takedown proposal and send it as a notarized letter (on fancy paper, too) to Silver. And that’ll solve everything! Embed Code More: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS | Embed read more

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