Q&A Enfield optimistic about second year with USC

first_imgAfter a rough first season, USC men’s basketball head coach Andy Enfield feels optimistic about the future of his team. USC was able to land some exciting prospects that could help the team compete immediately in the difficult Pac-12 conference. Daily Trojan staff writer Nick Barbarino recently had the chance to sit down with the second-year coach to get his thoughts on the upcoming season.Dunk City LA · Head coach Andy Enfield led USC to an overall record of 11-21 in his first season, with just two wins in Pac-12 play. Enfield guided Florida Gulf Coast to the Sweet Sixteen of the NCAA tournament in 2013. – Ralf Cheung | Daily Trojan DT: Last season, Byron Wesley led the team in scoring with points per game. After losing him, who do you expect to step up this season?AE: We have a very talented freshman class, along with some sophomores that have experience. We have two new sophomores that were transfers that sat out (last season). So the bulk of our team is freshmen and sophomores. The advantage we have is that it’s a balanced group, meaning that we’re not relying on one player to score 20-something points a night for us. We have a lot of players capable of scoring in double figures, and we need everyone to step up in a different night. I think we have enough depth and enough potential scorers [that] it’ll be harder for opposing teams to design defenses just to stop one player.DT: Speaking of the incoming freshman class, this was the first time since 2010 that USC had brought in a top 100 recruit. Can you talk about that?AE: Well we have four guys who are top 100 players. Jordan McLaughlin, the point guard, was ranked No. 36 in the country. Shooting guard Elijah Stewart was ranked as high as 40th in one scouting service. Forward Malik Marquetti was in the 60s in one scouting service. And forward Malik Martin was in the top-100 in one scouting service. So we really have four guys that were in the top 100 in different scouting services. So to answer your last question, the advantage is bringing in talented players. Disadvantages, we’re going to rely upon our sophomores, the two transfers and the two players, Nikola [Jovanovich] and Julian Jacobs that played a lot last year, as well as Kahlil Dukes. And we have our juniors that provide leadership and depth at certain positions.DT: Speaking of the young team, how are you planning on keeping them focused throughout a long season that has many obstacles?AE: Well this is college basketball, they are here for a reason and that’s to be student athletes and have the opportunity of a lifetime. So if they’re not focused or ready to play, well then they need to be.DT: You were really famous for Dunk City two seasons ago in the NCAA Tournament. Are we going to see that type of play this year or is that in the past?AE: Dunk City was a name that someone else gave our team at Florida Gulf Coast. I was fortunate to coach a terrific group of young players that developed quickly and were able to execute a system in a very effective way on both ends of the floor. They were an excellent defensive and offensive team. There are particular parts of that system that I believe in and it starts on the defensive end and there are things that we want to do on the offensive end here at USC. Give our assistant coaches a ton of credit because those two transfers and the four freshmen that we’ve recruited and brought in as a staff are excellent players and they are able to fit what we’re trying to do on both ends of the floor. We also plan on bringing players in from the 2015 class that are able to do what we would like to do on the offense and defensive end.DT: With such a young team, what are you expecting to see this season? A lot of growth among the players or is this team ready to compete with the Arizona’s and UCLA’s of the Pac-12 conference?AE: We’re expecting to compete every game and every night out on the floor. I don’t set goals as far as wins and losses as a coach. And our coaching staff, our goal is to develop our players and make them better every week. As we go through the season, our young players need to mature and develop quickly because we don’t have any seniors. Our goal is to compete, get better and, if we do the things that we’re capable of doing on the offensive and defensive end, we should have a successful season.DT: You were able to bring in Jordan McLaughlin over many rival schools. What do you attribute that to?AE: We recruit for USC and what we’re trying to do. We recruited Jordan [McLaughlin] because we loved him as a player and he’s also a great kid. He comes from a wonderful family, and we think he has potential to be a big-time leader and just a terrific player at USC for the near future. We’re extremely excited about having Jordan [McLaughlin], and at the same time, we understand that he’s a freshman and it’s a great opportunity for him to come to a young team and develop quickly.USC kicks off their preseason schedule next Saturday, Nov. 15, against the Portland State Vikings. The game will be at the Galen Center with a tip-off time of 7:30 PST.last_img read more

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Africa eyes agriculture deal at COP 17

first_img28 September 2011African negotiators at the upcoming UN climate summit in Durban must push for a binding and responsible climate deal on agriculture, says Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network CEO Lindiwe Sibanda.The 17th Conference of the Parties (COP 17) to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) takes place in Durban from 28 November to 9 December.Sibanda said African negotiators should make it their priority to secure a deal that promoted food security, in order to ensure that climate change did not wreak further havoc on the continent.Addressing reporters in Pretoria this week about her organisation’s call, “No agriculture, no deal” for COP 17, Sibanda said: “We are grateful that COP 17 is taking place on the African continent. Now we want African negotiators to come out of this gathering with a responsible, binding climate change deal on agriculture.“Should they fail to clinch a deal at COP 17, civil society will rise and say, ‘Any deal that does not have agriculture as a stand-alone priority sector is a betrayal to the farming sector and anybody who needs food to survive.’”Sibanda said commitments made at the previous summit in Cancun, Mexico had to be sealed.“Let’s not keep on changing … Our view is that COP 17 in Durban [should] produce concrete outputs that would be binding to everyone.”Regarding the “No agriculture, no deal” campaign, Sibanda said: “We don’t embark on protest campaigns, but we advocate for evidence-based dialogue. Agriculture is the backbone of Africa’s economy, so we will use all our power to ensure that agriculture is put on the centre stage at the COP 17.”Sibanda said it was disturbing that developed countries were still refusing to make a binding deal to reduce atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases, adding that Africa would use COP 17 to push for a better global environment, improved agricultural productivity and land use.The Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network will partner with Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) to host an Agriculture Day as a COP 17 side-event on 3 December.It will also advocate for climate-smart, which includes proven techniques such as agro-forestry, improved grazing, zero tillage and intercropping.The Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network is an autonomous, regional, stakeholder-driven policy research, analysis and implementation network that was established in the Southern Africa Development Community (SADC) in 1997.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

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Summary of the new tax law and its impact on Ohio agriculture

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Brian E. RavencraftOn Dec. 22, President Donald Trump signed HR 1 into law. This new law implements the most significant changes to our tax code in more than 30 years. This article provides a general overview of some of the provisions that most impact farmers.• Tax Bracket Changes: Most farm businesses are taxed as sole proprietorships, partnerships or S corporations. This means business income is passed through to the owners, who pay taxes based upon individual income tax rates. HR 1 lowers individual income tax rates across the board, starting in 2018. The total number of brackets remains at seven, but the top rate will fall from 39.6% to 37%, and the amount of income covered by the lower brackets has been adjusted upward. The new law leaves the maximum rates on net capital gains and qualified dividends unchanged.• Standard deductions: HR 1 increases the standard deduction from $12,000 to $24,000 for married filing jointly taxpayers and from $6,500 to $12,000 for single taxpayers.• Eliminating the personal exemption: In conjunction with increasing the standard deduction and lowering individual income tax rates, HR 1 eliminates the personal exemption from 2018 through 2025.• Elimination of various deductions: For State and local tax deduction, the new law limits the amount of combined state and local income and property taxes taxpayers can claim as an itemized deduction to $10,000. Property taxes incurred in a trade or business, however, continue to be fully deductible on a Schedule C, Schedule E or Schedule F.For charitable contributions, the new law basically does not change the current law regarding deductibility of charitable contributions; however, with the increase in the standard deduction and the loss of many itemized deductions, many charitable contributions may no longer result in a tax deduction.• Alternative minimum tax: The AMT still remains for individuals, but exemptions amounts are significantly increased.• Child tax credit and new dependent credit: The child tax credit was raised from $1,000 to $2,000 per qualifying child. It also provides a $500 credit for dependents who do not qualify for the child tax credit, including those over the age of 16.• Section 179 Expense: Beginning in 2018, Section 179 is expanded to provide an immediate $1 million deduction (up from $510,000 in 2017) with a $2.5 million phase-out threshold (up from $2.03 million in 2017).• Bonus Depreciation: The new law allows 100% bonus depreciation for five years for qualifying property acquired and placed into service on or after Sept. 27, 2017. The additional first-year depreciation percentage is then reduced, until fully eliminated in 2027. HR 1 applies bonus depreciation to used property, as well as new property, whereas under the old law the bonus depreciation was applicable to new property.• Farm equipment depreciation: Beginning in 2018, farm equipment may be depreciated over a period of five years, instead of seven years.• Like kind exchanges: The new law retains IRC §1031 like-kind exchange treatment for real property, but eliminates it for personal property, such as farm equipment or breeding livestock.• Net operating losses: Beginning in 2018, HR 1 reduces the five-year carryback of net operating losses for a farming business to two years. It also limits the net operating loss deduction to 80% of taxable income for losses incurred after Dec. 31, 2017.• Domestic production activities deduction: Starting in 2018, HR 1 eliminates the DPAD deduction, which has been frequently used by agricultural producers and cooperatives. Ag Cooperatives will have a new 20% deduction, but it will not pass through to farmers like the DPAD did.• Corporate Tax Rates: The new tax law permanently lowers the maximum corporate tax rate from 35% to 21%, beginning in 2018. The law also transforms the corporate tax structure from a graduated system to a flat rate for all income. As such, some small C corporations who traditionally managed the income to the 15% brackets will see an increase in their corporate income tax rate from 15% to 21%.• Non corporate taxpayers: These individuals can generally deduct 20% of “qualified business income,” defined as the net amount of income, gain, deduction and loss attributable to a domestic trade or business, from their taxable income. This includes net farm income reported on Schedule F, as well as net cash rental income reported on Schedule E. It also doesn’t include reasonable compensation received by an S corporation shareholder or guaranteed payments received by a partner in a partnership. For farmers filing individually and farmers with income under $315,000 (for married couples filing jointly), the reduction is 20%. Once you go over this income amount, the limitation begins on the deduction to 50% of wages paid by a farm operation or 25% of wages paid plus 2.5% of original cost of depreciable farm assets that are less than 10 years old. This computation is not as easy as it sounds and separate depreciation schedules will need to be kept for this computation.• Estate and Gift Returns: The new law doubles the basic exclusion amount for tax years 2018 through 2025. Thus, a person can die with $11.2 million of property in 2018 and the estate will owe no tax. Basis adjustments (often a “step up”) continue at death for all estates.A majority of farmers are sole proprietors or structured as pass-through entities. If you are in this group, you should see some benefits from the deduction for business and pass-through income, immediate expensing of capital purchases, and potentially from reductions in individual rates.As farmers, you should work with your tax advisers to see if you should make changes to your business structures or operations in response to the new law. Taxation is highly dependent upon your individual set of facts. In general, however, most agricultural folks should see lower tax liability for the next eight years because of HR 1. After that, however, the changes sunset at the end of 2025, meaning they go away, unless a future Congress acts to restore them. Brian E. Ravencraft, CPA, CGMA is a Principal with Holbrook & Manter, CPAs. Brian has been with Holbrook & Manter since 1995, primarily focusing on the areas of Tax Consulting and Management Advisory Services within several firm service areas, focusing on agri-business and closely held businesses and their owners. Holbrook & Manter is a professional services firm founded in 1919 and we are unique in that we offer the resources of a large firm without compromising the focused and responsive personal attention that each client deserves. You can reach Brian through www.HolbrookManter.com or at [email protected]last_img read more

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Ohio Farm Bureau celebrates where it all began 100 years later

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Monday, Ohio Farm Bureau employees, members, and supporters came together to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the organization’s founding. On January 27th, 1919, prospective Farm Bureau members came together to form the organization. A century later, today’s Farm Bureau installed a plaque commemorating the organization in front of the very place it was founded.In this video, Ohio Farm Bureau President Frank Burkett talks the exciting time for OFBF, while Dr. Cathann Kress, dean of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at Ohio State, comments on life in agriculture down the years.Ohio Ag Net’s Joel Penhorwood has more.last_img read more

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