Bafana upbeat for World Cup opener

first_img9 June 2010South Africa take on Mexico at Soccer City Stadium, Johannesburg on Friday in the opening match of the 2010 Fifa World Cup. It promises to be a thrilling encounter, with Bafana Bafana’s players oozing confidence, though well aware that the Mexicans will be tough to beat.Bafana striker Bernard Parker said he was aware that their first opponents were an experienced side, but one that would hopefully not outplay them.“We know that they are an experienced side, but we cannot be walked all over on our own home ground. We will go out to do what we do best, keeping the ball on the ground and scoring goals,” he said on Tuesday.The FC Twente striker said he was not concerned about facing Mexican skipper Rafael Marquez, who is regarded as one of the best defenders in the world.“I know that Marquez is an experienced defender, but should he become more solid, as a striker I will also get tougher,” he said.‘Anything is possible’Parker said Bafana’s focus is to go beyond the group stages of the tournament. “We want to beat all our opponents; anything is possible at the knockout stages,” he said.Winning all their World Cup preparation friendly matches has boosted the player’s confidence, Parker said, adding that they did not feel under pressure as they were physically and mentally fit to face Mexico.Bafana defender Matthew Booth said confidently that, once they had beaten Mexico on Friday, the momentum would carry them through to the second stage of the tournament.“Our coach [Carlos Alberto Parreira] proved to be the right candidate for the job because he gave the team confidence. We are physically fit, looking good as ever,” he said.Injury not seriousBafana’s goalkeeper, Itumeleng Khune, said the injury he sustained when Bafana beat Colombia 2-1 was not serious, and that he was more than ready for the opening match. “It was just a knock, and the medical team declared me fit.”Khune said it was important for Bafana to win their opening match on Friday.“It is crucial for us as the host to win all the matches; we’ve a good advantage – our supporters who will come in their numbers blowing vuvuzelas. We are prepared to do more than our best for our country. We are prepared to show what we are made of.“Mexico is an experienced team, but we will give them a good run,” Khune said. “We’ve quality and capable players who are committed to making themselves and their country proud.”Khune emphasised that the team wants to beat the Mexicans and not draw with them.‘They should be worried about us’“I don’t think as Bafana we should be worrying about Mexico, instead they should be the ones worried about playing us at home in front of our vibrant crowd.”Teammate Siphiwe Tshabalala, who will be making his 50th appearance in Bafana colours, said he can’t wait to play on Friday.“It would be an important day for me because I will be marking my 50th cap for Bafana, and I would like to celebrate the day with a very good performance and victory,” he said.Mexico has qualified for the past four World Cups, from 1994 until 2006. They have reached the round of 16 on every occasion, but have not progressed beyond that stage. The Mexicans are currently ranked 17th by Fifa.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

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COP 17 climate talks set to intensify

first_img2 December 2011The first week of the annual UN climate change summit is usually a relatively sedate affair, and COP 17 in Durban has not been an exception.But with the six panels wrapping up their discussions on Saturday ahead of the high-level segment involving ministers and heads of state, next week will see the start of an intense debate on what the global path to addressing the effects of climate change should be.At least 12 heads of state and 130 government ministers from around the world are expected to join the talks next week.‘Progress on several issues’The UN reported on Friday that major progress had been made on several issues, including the structure of the adaptation package agreed on in Cancun, Mexico last year, finance and technology.Negotiators were, however, still locked behind closed doors hammering out possible solutions to the complex debate around the Kyoto Protocol and the Green Climate Fund.Developing countries are pushing for a second commitment period for the Protocol, which was signed in 1997, committing industrialised nations to measurable emission reduction targets. Earlier this week, Canada became the first developed country to give an indication that it was no longer interested in the Protocol.Major economies, which include the United States and Japan, are refusing to commit.Kyoto Protocol in the balanceUNFCCC executive secretary Christiana Figueres could not confirm reports on Friday that there was a stalemate on the protocol as reported, say the ministers’ session next week would provide direction on the future of the treaty.“As you know, the issue of the Kyoto Protocol is a very crucial issue and central for Durban and discussions are taking place,” Figueres said.She said governments had ample time over the coming weekend to go through a list of proposals which, among others, include the structure of the adaptation package, technology transfer and mitigation plans.The European Union said it was in favour of the new term of commitment to the Protocol, but has attached conditions to this.Figueres said South African International Relations Minister Maite Nkoana-Mashabane, in her capacity as COP 17 president, had also started consultations on the EU’s position.Russia has also proposed amendments to the convention to allow for a periodic revision of countries that are under certain obligations to cut emissions. Currently, developing nations have fewer obligations to reduce their greenhouse gas emission compared with major economies.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

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Production Tip: How to Edit a Fight Scene for Rhythm and Pacing

first_imgTips and TricksBeyond editing rhythm, you may need to touch up the footage a bit with some speed control. Sometimes you need to speed up footage even of highly skilled performers to create a consistent and compelling speed throughout the fight. But beware! Don’t go overboard. Speeding up the footage beyond 106 percent will definitely let the audience know that you’ve done something artificial (remember, the editor wants their work to remain invisible).Even Jackie Chan is guilty of this. Notice the speed of the hotel fight from Project A. It’s enough to feel unnatural.Don’t uniformly speed up every single shot. In fact, sometimes you only need to speed up certain moves. A good trick for that is speed ramping. You can find some in-depth tutorials online for speed ramping, but here’s a quick breakdown for Premiere Pro CC.Don’t speed it up too much, and ease in and out of the the speed ramp. You still want the scene to feel natural.Another technique that’s been gaining popularity is removing a single frame around the point of impact of a punch or a kick. When done well, it can make the scene feel faster and more powerful. Personally I find that it can often be visually jarring (which some directors may want), but you can still use it to great effect. An excellent example of this is from Freddie Wong’s “Whose Gun is it, Anyway?” YouTube short.If you look closely, you’ll just barely notice a missing frame to make the head butt look faster and more brutal.As with all things in film, editing is an art. There are no strict guidelines on how to make something look good. Sometimes, especially with a fight scene, you’ll be going back and forth on each clip, cutting it down by two or three frames or adding back two or three frames, to get that rhythm just right.I want to leave you with some inspiration. Not only is this fight beautifully choreographed and shot, but the editing is top notch. It communicates all the characters’ emotions and fighting techniques clearly, creating a fast-paced scene without short, fast cuts, and it creates tension as it plays with its rhythm Good fight scenes need vision, planning, and careful choreography. But ultimately, they depend on the edit for their power.A good fight scene can add energy and power to your film or video project. Seeing the hero rise up against their foes and take them down with excellent choreography can be a really exciting and emotional moment. But a key element to any fight scene is the editing, so let’s take a look at how to do it.Pre-ProductionIf you haven’t shot your fight scene yet, check out my earlier article “Directing Fight Cinematography: The Right Way and the Wrong Way” for some direction on the production side of the fight. Once you’re caught up, you’ll be set up to shoot a quality action piece.Image via “Choreographing A Fight Scene With A Hollywood Stunt Man.”But perhaps you’ve already shot your scene — or you’re editing someone else’s fight. What then?If you’re fortunate enough to join the project before production begins, then speak with the director, and make sure that each new shot in the fight scene begins with the last punch or kick from the previous shot. This will help everything flow together nicely in the edit and avoid the talent stalling at the beginning of each cut.If the director hasn’t already edited a rough version of the fight from rehearsal footage, then they may not have a clear picture of the edit they want to see. If so, get the director to shoot as much coverage as possible from a variety of angles. This will give you room to play in the edit and get a good cut of the fight.Editing RhythmIf your director does have a clear vision of the edit, then your job is a little easier. Take their direction and refine the fight. But if they just hand you hours of footage from various angles with the instruction to “Cut this together,” then it’s a bit trickier.After watching the footage, you’ll be able to tell pretty quickly if the performers are talented martial artists or not. If they are, then I recommend longer cuts to showcase their skill. That doesn’t mean each cut needs to be ten seconds, but give it a little breathing room when you can.If the performers aren’t that great, then you may need to use really short cuts and fast edits. Take a look at the ridiculous opening to xXx: The Return of Xander Cage. While the edit for Donnie Yen, who is a very talented martial artist, doesn’t involve super-long sequences, the cuts are a bit longer, and the camera work is smooth. But you’ll notice a stark contrast in the same scene when his British cohort rushes out of the elevator.When Yen’s cohort appears, the camera suddenly becomes very shaky, and the edits become super fast. Too fast for comfort — everything feels jarring and rushed. But a fight scene with fast cuts doesn’t have to be a bad thing! If the footage is shot well, then the fight can still feel really good. However we have to keep rhythm and pacing in mind.When I approach editing, I see the edits almost like music. The timing between cuts has a natural rhythm. No, I don’t time out each shot like a piece of sheet music; I feel it out. If the edits suddenly become super-fast-paced and quick, it’s like someone smashing the keys in the middle of the Moonlight Sonata. If your fight is or has to be cut with short takes and fast edits, then ease in and out of it.Check out this scene from Mission: Impossible — Ghost Protocol. Notice how the editing pace slowly increases as the fight progresses instead of suddenly becoming fast-paced with a single cut (as in the xXx scene). Cover image via Mission: Impossible — Fallout (Paramount Pictures).Looking for more filmmaking tips? Check these out.40+ Free Footstep Foley Sound Effects for Sound Design5 Advantages of Self-Distributing Your Next Feature FilmThe Right Way to Give and Receive Feedback on a ScriptChoosing Aspect Ratio: A Guide to What You Need to KnowWhich Camera Movement Should You Use — And When And Why?last_img read more

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Saina Nehwal third in Player of the Year list

first_imgAce Indian shuttler Saina Nehwal, who won five major titles last year, has been voted as the third best Badminton Player of the Year 2010 by readers of an international magazine in a recent poll.File photo of Saina NehwalBadzine, an international badminton magazine, conducted a poll recently and the readers gave Commonwealth Games gold medallist Saina 34 votes to be ranked third in the best players’ list.China’s Lin Dan was voted as the Badminton Player of the Year for 2010 after receiving 110 votes while Lee Chong Wei of Malaysia was a very close runner-up with 97 votes.Fifteen-year-old Ratchanok Intanon of Thailand, who won her second World Junior title as well as her first Grand Prix and Grand Prix Gold titles was a surprising fourth with 29 votes in the poll.Saina, 20, won three back-to-back titles in June last year, winning the Indian Grand Prix, Singapore Super Series and defended the Indonesian Super Series.She also won the Commonwealth gold medal in New Delhi, before clinching the Hong Kong Open in November.With five major titles in her kitty, Saina came tantalisingly close to reaching the top rank last year when she climbed to world number two spot before slipping to number four.An injury to her right ankle forced the girl from Hyderabad to pull out of season-ending Indian Open Grand Prix in December. She also missed the Super Series Masters in January this year for the same injury.-With PTI inputslast_img read more

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