2017-18 ORVC BOYS BASKETBALL AWARDS

first_imgThis is the 2017-2018 ORVC All-Conference Boys Basketball Teamas voted on by the head coaches of the conference schools: 2017-18 ORVC Champions (Varsity)                                             Southwestern Rebels 2017-18 ORVC Coach of the Year                      Jerry Bomholt                 Southwestern 2017-18 ORVC Co-Mental Attitude Award  Tyler Perry                Switzerland CountyConner Hubbard                    Jac-Cen-Del 2017-18 ORVC Champions (Reserve)                                               Jac-Cen-Del Eagles Listed Alphabetically BRANDON BABER                                                JAC-CEN-DEL                        CONNER HUBBARD                                 JAC-CEN-DEL                        NICK KOONS                                               RISING SUN                        TYLER KRAMER                                        SOUTHWESTERN                        DILLAN McQUEEN                                   SOUTH RIPLEY                        FOSTER MEFFORD                                   SOUTHWESTERN                        HUNTER MEFFORD                                 SOUTHWESTERN                        JED MINNICH                                            MILAN                        ZAC MINNICH                                            MILAN                        NOAH PFLUM                                            RISING SUN                        AUSTIN SOUTH                                         SWITZERLAND COUNTY                        BRENT TURNER                                       RISING SUN                        KYLE WHITHAM                                      SWITZERLAND COUNTY                        MATTHEW WILLIAMS                           SOUTHWESTERNlast_img read more

Read More →

2 Indian Hospitals’ Delegations Expected Here

first_imgTwo of India’s most renowned hospitals are expected to send representatives in Liberia shortly in contemplation of creating a public-partnership within the health sector of the country. At the same time, they will perform clinical procedures at the John F. Kennedy Memorial Medical Center (JFKMC) in Sinkor.The hospitals—Indraprastha Apollo (Apollo) and LV Prasad Eye Institute (LVPEI)—are expected to build a long term, mutually beneficial partnership for better health services for the citizens of Liberia.The Daily Observer was informed that negotiations for the arrival of the delegations was made successful by the Indian Honorary Consul General to Liberia, Mr. Upjit Singh Sachdeva, who is commonly known as Jeety.The hospitals’ partnerships with JFK would aimed at offering “super specialist consultation services, training of medical and paramedical personnel and treatment of patients in need of specialized care at centers.”A release from JFK said LVPEI’s delegation arrived in Liberia on February 15, and will remain in the country until the 17th.The delegation is expected to hold talks with Dr. (MD) Walter T. Gwenigale, the Minister of Health and Social Welfare and senior officials of the Health Ministry. Later, its members will  meet with President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf.The release also said that the visiting delegation led by Dr. (MD) Gullapali N. Rao, founder of LVPEI, will tour the medical facilities of JFK, meet with the A.M. Doglioti College administrative staff. The delegates will hold discussions with some members of government institutions, NGO community, as well as the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Lion’s Club.“LV Prasad Eye Institute offers comprehensive patient care, clinical research, sight enhancement, and rehabilitation, community eye health, education, and product development. It is a WHO collaborating center for the prevention of blindness. Equipped with cutting-edge technology and distinguished professionals in the field of eye care, it emphasizes the provision of quality eye care to people from all walks of society. The Eye Institute is a non-profit organization governed by the Hyderabad Eye Institute and the Hyderabad Eye Research Foundation,” the release stated.The Apollo delegation, according to JFK, will arrive in Liberia on Wednesday, February 19 and stay in the country until the 22nd.It will begin screening at the JFK on Thursday, February 20 and Friday, February 21 respectively.JFK administration said it is pleased that Apollo’s physicians will screen and evaluate for cancerous diseases, neurological and spinal disorders. JFK said that the Apollo delegation will also hold scientific lectures on advances in cancer care and neurological sciences.Apollo’s partnership with JFK is aimed at, among other things, ensuring speedy, efficient and cost-effective delivery of medical services; values for money for the taxpayer and patients through optimal knowledge transfer and risk management and efficiencies from integrating design and delivery of medical services with operation; maintenance/upgrading and effective utilization of state assets to the benefit of all users of JFK’s services.Apollo Hospitals Group is an integrated healthcare organization with owns and manages hospitals, diagnostic clinics, dispensing pharmacies and consultancy services. In addition, the group’s services include healthcare at the patient’s doorstep, clinical & diagnostic services, medical business process outsourcing, third party administration services, and health insurance.Many Liberians travel to India every year to seek medical attention. Most of said that India’s medical fees are relatively less expensive.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Read More →

On the Jobsite with Foamglas

first_imgWhy we need a product like FoamglasI’ve written often about the problems with extruded polystyrene from an environmental and health perspective. Relative to performance, extruded polystyrene (XPS) is a great product. It is water-resistant so can be used below-grade; it has high compressive strength so can be used beneath a concrete slab floor; it insulates very well (R-5 per inch); and it’s inexpensive. These properties make XPS the nearly universal choice for sub-slab and exterior foundation insulation today.But along with these benefits are some significant downsides. All XPS today (as well as expanded polystyrene, EPS) is made with the brominated flame retardant HBCD that has recently been added to the Stockholm list of Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) and is being banned in much of the world. HBCD provides some level of fire protection, though some studies suggest that its benefits are greatly exaggerated — and that that protection, if real, is irrelevant below grade. RELATED ARTICLES Foamglas — My New Favorite Insulation MaterialGBA Product Guide: FoamglasAvoiding the Global Warming Product of Insulation Stone veneer cement makes a good adhesiveWe installed four inches of Foamglas under the basement floor slab and six inches on the exterior of the foundation walls. Our designer/builder, Eli Gould, and his six-person crew not only did admirably with this little-known material, but he came up with what I believe is a great option for adhering Foamglas to a foundation wall.We were debating whether to use Pittsburgh Corning’s recommended solvent-based adhesive (“tar”) or their acrylic formula (a greener, water-based tar), which apparently doesn’t have quite as good performance properties as the solvent-based option. But the recommended solvent-based formulation sounded quite hazardous (it’s a two-component adhesive with one component consisting of three different types of diisocyanate and the other component consisting of petroleum asphalt, coal bitumen, naphthenic distillate, and hydrocarbon solvents). We wanted a well-performing adhesive, but the solvent-based option didn’t sound like something we wanted to expose workers to during installation or surround our home with. Eli tested different engineered cement products, as modern polymers have dramatically changed the adhesive capabilities of cement in the last couple decades. They are also free of VOCs and sounded far safer from a health and environmental standpoint.We settled on a polymer cement product  made by Ardex used for adhering stone veneer onto masonry walls, and it worked beautifully. The two companies (Ardex and Pittsburgh Corning) were so intrigued by our field-testing that they have begun conversations about testing and developing this alternative adhesive system.Ardex also supplies a waterproofing coating that we applied over the Foamglas on the foundation walls: Ardicoat Plus. We used this in place of conventional asphalt-based (tar) coating, and I feel really good about not having hydrocarbons from the coating seeping into the groundwater or being released as VOCs. In addition, XPS is currently made with the blowing agent HFC-134a, which is a potent greenhouse gas that contributes to global warming. And some of the petrochemical-derived raw materials, including benzene and styrene monomer, are carcinogenic — though once converted into polystyrene, that carcinogenicity is not present.From a performance standpoint, XPS — like most other foam plastic insulation materials — is readily tunneled through by subterranean termites, carpenter ants, and other wood-boring insects. In my role with Environmental Building News and our GreenSpec Product Database, I get plenty of opportunities to research and write about innovative building products. That’s one of the really fun aspects of my job.On occasion I also get an opportunity to try out new or little-known materials. In the construction of our new home in Dummerston, Vermont — actually the rebuilding of a 200-year Cape — I’ve had opportunity to get some real experience with lots of products. One of these is a cellular glass insulation material known as Foamglas. Foamglas to the rescueFoamglas is a cellular glass, rigid boardstock insulation material. It has high compressive strength, excellent moisture resistance, and tremendous fire resistance without the use of flame retardants. It is moderately well-insulating at R-3.4 per inch (32% lower than XPS), and it’s made without environmentally damaging blowing agents. It is also about the only insulation material that is totally impervious to wood-boring insects — a useful property for below-grade applications — particularly in a warming planet with termites extending their ranges north.Foamglas has actually been around a long time — since Pittsburgh Corning introduced it in the 1930s — but it is used primarily for high-temperature industrial applications, such as insulating steam pipes and furnaces. It’s use as an insulation material for buildings remains very uncommon, though this use is increasing in Europe.Even though Foamglas is significantly more expensive than XPS and its per-inch insulating value is lower, the environmental and health benefits made me want to try it out on our own home. Compared to XPS, it costs more and has a lower R-valueOur foundation ends up with a respectable R-12 under the basement slab and R-22 on the exterior of the foundation walls. That’s not up to the insulation levels in a typical Passivhaus, but it should be good enough to enable us to achieve net-zero-energy performance with a PV system supplying power for an air-source heat pump. And it should last literally hundreds of years — a lifespan that I believe we should be aiming for in home building today.We spent more for the Foamglas foundation insulation than we would have with XPS, but it feels good to have put my money where my mouth is relative to spurring product innovation and demonstrating greener building material options.Eli and I also hope that by leading this sort of collaboration we may be able to help drive down the costs while broadening the market for Foamglas and other innovative products. With Foamglas and other inorganic products like this that may come along, we hope to see more durable, insect-resistant foundation systems that can help reduce energy consumption while minimizing health and environmental impacts.  Foundations are not the only part of the building in which Eli and I plan to help companies “connect the dots” in developing better buildings. We’re working on innovative window solutions for existing homes, superinsulated roof systems, and modular components to speed construction — but those are topics for future columns.Who knows, maybe we can even convince some leading manufacturers to move to the Brattleboro area and help to spur economic development in the region. Alex is founder of BuildingGreen, Inc. and executive editor of Environmental Building News. He also recently created the Resilient Design Institute. To keep up with Alex’s latest articles and musings, you can sign up for his Twitter feed.last_img read more

Read More →