Hot off the Press: The October Issue of Blue Ridge Outdoors

first_imgColors begin spilling down the mountains this month. Blue Ridge Outdoors talks with four photography pros who share their favorite fall foliage spots and secrets with readers. This month, we also celebrate the 50th birthday of The Wilderness Act by exploring Appalachia’s wildest public lands, and we offer the simplest, easiest way to save more of them.Readers get a sneak peek inside the backpack of A.T. record holder Jennifer Pharr Davis and a music preview of Halloween ear candy. And as BRO readers already know, play is more than just fun. It’s an essential ingredient for health, both as kids and adults. In the October issue, we review the latest scientific research showing the benefits of outdoor play. We also pick 10 off-the-radar state parks that offer adventures as epic as national parks but with far fewer crowds.featuresWILDERNESS AT 50Exploring Appalachia’s wildest public lands and The Magic Kingdom of WildernessHIDDEN TREASURESOften overshadowed by national parks, state parks offer equally epic adventures with far fewer crowds. Here are 10 off-the-radar favorites.PICTURE PERFECTFour photography pros share their favorite fall foliage spots and secrets.THE NEED TO PLAYPlay is more than just fun. It’s an essential ingredient for health, both as kids and adults.departmentsEDITOR’S NOTEThe easy way to save the planetFLASHPOINTSolar could power half of AppalachiaQUICK HITSGeorgia runner sets barefoot record/Shirtless steeplechaser stripped of gold medal/and more!THE DIRTPaddling pros share five essential skillsTHE GOODSPeek inside the backpack of A.T. record holder Jennifer Pharr DavisTRAIL MIXJudah & the Lion and their new album Kids These Dayslast_img read more

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Unai Emery finally explains why he left Aaron Ramsey out of his Arsenal team

first_imgAaron Ramsey will join Juventus from Arsenal in the summer (Picture: Getty)Unai Emery claims Aaron Ramsey’s ‘confused’ state of mind played a part in his decision to leave the Arsenal star out of his side on a regular basis earlier this season.The Wales international began the campaign as a mainstay of Emery’s new-look team but, amid uncertainty surrounding his future, Ramsey failed to start a single Premier League game between October 7 and December 5.Emery reportedly advised Arsenal to withdraw a contract offer made to the scorer of two FA Cup final winning goals and the 28-year-old subsequently agreed a deal to sign for Juventus, who he is set to join in the summer.AdvertisementAdvertisementDespite his future lying elsewhere, Ramsey had re-established himself as a key component of an Arsenal team that has reached the semi-finals of the Europa League and is closing in on a top four finish in the Premier League, before he sustained a hamstring injury against Napoli on Thursday which will rule him out of action for up to three weeks.ADVERTISEMENTMore: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man City Unai Emery speaks after Arsenal qualify for Europa League semi-finalTo view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video Play VideoLoaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 11:35FullscreenUnai Emery speaks after Arsenal qualify for Europa League semi-finalhttps://metro.co.uk/video/unai-emery-speaks-arsenal-qualify-europa-league-semi-final-1908664/This is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.‘His progress this season is amazing,’ Emery said.‘At the beginning (of the season), he was a little confused maybe, because he is in the last year of his contract.‘For us, and for me, he is a very important player but his confusion maybe did not help us at some moments in the season – not like his performances now.‘In his last few performances he has been helping us a lot – and in some of the key moments of this season. His injury is bad news and I don’t know how long he will be out of the team, maybe two or three weeks.’More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing Arsenal Metro Sport ReporterFriday 19 Apr 2019 8:23 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link236Shares Unai Emery finally explains why he left Aaron Ramsey out of his Arsenal team Advertisementcenter_img Advertisement Commentlast_img read more

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Titleholder Cath skims to a share of the lead

first_img Defending champion Cath Rawthore produced a miracle shot to share the lead after the first round of the English senior women’s stroke play at Broadstone in Dorset.She skimmed a ball across the surface of the water in front of the third green and walked off the hole with a par. “It was a corker,” she laughed, after returning a two-over par 74 to catch fellow international Julie Brown.“I’d hit a wayward drive into deep grass and I thought about chipping out, but that would have been a shot gone. So I had a go and the ball came shooting out, went into the water and went bump, bump on to the green.Rawthore, (image © Leaderboard Photography) from Sale in Cheshire, added: “I thought ‘Here we go!’ But my luck ran out on the seventh where I had a double bogey.”However, she soon put that behind her and played the remaining holes in two-under par for a satisfactory start to her defence. “I’m pleased,” said Rawthore, who is also the British senior champion. “It’s nice to be there or thereabouts after day one and I thoroughly enjoyed it. It’s a fabulous course and the greens are lovely – but tricky.”Brown, the 2014 English senior women’s champion from Trentham, was the first to set the target on a warm, sunny day. She played steadily throughout the round, with just one three-putt, and said: “I felt I could have been one shot better but I’m not unhappy, it was a good first round.”In contrast to Rawthore, she made short work of the par five seventh, hitting the green in two to set up a birdie. “I really went for it!” she said.“The course is absolutely fantastic, but it’s really tough. It’s demanding on every single shot, you can’t let up anywhere, you have to focus on everything.”Rawthore and Brown were both in early groups and, while no-one could pass them, they are being chased hard by a group of four players on three-over par.Katherine Russell (Royal Ashdown Forest) overcame a daunting start, when she triple-bogeyed the second, by playing the remaining 16 holes in level par, with three bogeys balanced by three birdies. She is joined in third place by Lindsey Shaw (Chevin), past champion Sue Dye (Delamere Forest), and Lulu Housman (Wyke Green).A stroke further back on four-over are Gillian Mellor (Prestbury) and Carol Wild (Notts’ Ladies).This championship is notable for the strong local entry. Broadstone, which boasts a very competitive and friendly ladies’ section, has nine members in the field, while another ten Dorset players are taking part.“Today has been so exciting,” said Broadstone’s Jo Hadley, who was delighted to play close to her nine handicap.“We don’t usually play with the England Golf flags up, the giant leaderboard, the scoring cabin and the referees. It’s just like you see on the telly! It’s a lovely show and it’s been brilliant.”After tomorrow’s second round the field will be cut to the leading 36 players and ties who will play the final round on Thursday. 16 Jun 2015 Titleholder Cath skims to a share of the lead last_img read more

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WDFW Approves Razor Clam Dig Starting March 2

first_imgFacebook2Tweet0Pin0 Submitted by The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) Clam diggers can return to two coastal beaches Monday (March 2) through Thursday (March 5) to dig razor clams during a month packed with potential digging opportunities.The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the dig at Long Beach and Twin Harbors after marine toxin tests showed the clams are safe to eat.As in previous openings, the dig is scheduled on evening tides. No digging will be allowed on any beach before noon.Under state law, diggers are required to keep the first 15 clams they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container.The four-day dig is scheduled for the following dates, beaches and low tides:March 2, Monday, 4:49 p.m.; 0.5 feet, Long Beach, Twin HarborsMarch 3, Tuesday, 5:26 p.m.; 0.4 feet, Long Beach, Twin HarborsMarch 4, Wednesday, 5:59 p.m.; 0.4 feet, Long Beach, Twin HarborsMarch 5, Thursday; 6:30 p.m.; 0.5 feet, Long Beach, Twin HarborsWDFW shellfish managers have tentatively scheduled a nine-day dig beginning March 16. Low tides will switch to morning from evening tides midway through the proposed dig on the following dates, beaches and tides:March 16, Monday, 4:15 p.m.; 0.3 feet, Long Beach, Twin HarborsMarch 17, Tuesday, 5:08 p.m.; -0.2 feet; Long Beach, Twin HarborsMarch 18, Wednesday, 5:57 p.m.; -0.5 feet, Long Beach, Twin HarborsMarch 19, Thursday, 6:42 p.m.; -0.5 feet, Long Beach, Twin HarborsMarch 20, Friday, 7:26 p.m.; -0.4 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis, MocrocksSeasonal switch to morning tidesMarch 21, Saturday, 7:55 a.m.; -0.5 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis, MocrocksMarch 22, Sunday, 8:42 a.m.; -0.7 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis, MocrocksMarch 23, Monday, 9:31 a.m.; -0.6 feet, Long Beach, Twin HarborsMarch 24, Tuesday, 10:21 a.m.; -0.3 feet, Long Beach, Twin HarborsAll diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2014-15 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW’s website and from license vendors around the state.More information about razor clams is available on WDFW’s webpage.last_img read more

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Protect the Pinelands From Pipeline Development

first_imgFormer Gov. Brendan Byrne stated in connection with that act, “My proudest accomplishment in public life is the passage of the Pinelands Protection Act and saving the Pine Barrens against all odds.”Construction of the pipeline is clearly an infraction of the integrity of the Pinelands and a violation of the intention of that Act.The vote on the nomination was extremely close – in fact, it only passed by the bare majority required and only after one Senator changed his vote on a second vote in the Senate Chamber.Many senators, including several Republicans, showed the courage to oppose the Governor’s appointment. Among those were Senators Beck, Kean, Allen, Bateman, and Holzapfel who are to be congratulated on their stand.That Sen. Kyrillos was not one of them is a rude awakening to those of his constituents who had hoped for better things from him. I am writing to express my enormous disappointment in state Sen. Joe Kyrillos’ “Yes” vote on the nomination of Robert Barr to the Pinelands Commission.Mr. Barr was nominated after the Pinelands Commission narrowly refused to approve construction of a pipeline through protected forests of one of our state’s, indeed our nation’s, great treasures, the New Jersey Pinelands.He will replace a long-ser ving Commissioner, Rober t Jackson, who voted against the pipeline. And he is very close to politicians who aggressively support the pipeline.There is not doubt that he was chosen to “stack” the Commission for a redo of the pipeline decision.As most New Jersey citizens know, this 1.1 million acre region of forest, fields, wetlands, and towns was designated by the Pinelands Protection Act of 1979 and is a model of planning, conservation, and growth management for the whole country.last_img read more

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Learning To Ride At Highland Farm

first_imgStory and photos by Art Petrosemolo ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS – It’s early September at Highland Farm. Shannon Cunneff, the Farm’s manager and head instructor works with 9-year old Winter Tietjen and her new pony named Poker.From the other side of the outdoor riding ring, she offered encouragement to Winter.“Eyes up! Shoulders back! Shorten you reins, close your knees,” Cunneff said.Winter moved Poker from a walk to a trot and into a canter following her instructor’s urging and then confidently over two jumps, breaking into a big smile as she heard Cunneff’s generous praise.Highland Farm was buzzing on this Saturday as youngsters caught up on lessons at the start of the fall riding and show season, with Cunneff and instructor Grace Smith scheduled to work with several students. Close to 20 ponies and horses, some owned by the farm and many personally owned, call the Highland Farm home.Highland’s riding facility includes grooming stalls, a tack room, feed and laundry room and an indoor wash stall with heat lamps plus large indoor and outdoor riding rings with jumps. It’s all part of a 70-acre tract with paddocks, fields, ponds and riding trails in the midst of Monmouth County, not far from Sandy Hook Bay.Winter Tietjen and Poker under the watchful eye of Shannon Cunneff.Instructors Cunneff and Smith have ridden and competed on show ponies and horses since they were children and relate to the pre-teens and teens under their care. They take riding seriously and help both novices and experienced young riders hone their skills. Along with years of experience, Cunneff is is certified through the United States Hunter Jumper Association as a professional trainer.Private lessons last about 30 minutes but students don’t just mount and ride. They are taught to tack their mounts (saddle and bridle their equine partner), under the watchful eye of an instructor and do so before every lesson prior to heading to the ring. Working with their pony teaches responsibility and helps create a strong bond between horse and rider, the instructors say.Cunneff and Smith give upwards of 50 lessons a week and coach their students at shows usually on Sundays in New Jersey and as far away as Florida and Vermont. Spring and fall are the busiest at Highland Farm, as it offers the best riding weather here at the Jersey shore.About half of the students are first-timers and some have family members who ride or who rode in the past. “Young girls outnumber the boys learning to ride,” Cunneff said, “and they gain great confidence in the process.”Youngsters start their riding adventure on a pony which is more “their size and much easier to control while you learn than mounting a big,1000-pound horse and being a long way from the ground,” she explained. Some riders stay with ponies throughout their riding and competition career. Highland Farm specializes in training its riders for hunter-jumper competition.Winter Tietjen gets saddle and tact in preparation for her riding less at Highland Farm.Many children get their first introduction to riding in one of Highland Farm’s several summer camps. “We can put a child on a pony at age six or seven,” Cunneff said, “although we have had five year olds who wanted to get on their first pony and take lessons.”Learning to care for the ponies they ride adds to the riding experience, the instructors believe. “We want to see a bond between horse and rider,” Cunneff said, and that comes with learning to tack the horse, walk it, and brush it down as part of their time here at the Farm. The bond happens quickly,” Cunneff smiled, “and it isn’t long before our serious students are talking to their parents about having their own pony.”Cunneff and Smith said learning to ride and competing in shows helps youngsters think and focus, and being responsible for a pony helps them mature. “Our kids compete in lots of shows,” Cunneff said, “and winning ribbons is fun and something we celebrate but not something we focus exclusively on. We encourage students ‘to ride for the ride and not for the ribbon’ and enjoy the experience.”The instructors and parents said that students develop very strong friendships with fellow riders at Highland Farm. “With a common focus and goals, there is very little pettiness here, all agree. The kids become friends and stay friends,” Cunneff stressed.Along with lessons, Cunneff overseas the care of the horses including visits from the veterinarian, farrier and equine dentist. A staff of grooms and stable hands works with her to keep equine residents happy, fit and healthy, and the facility a showplace for riders, their parents and visitors.“I’ve been riding since I was as old as my students,” Cunneff said, “and truly enjoy passing along the skills I’ve learned. I take great pride in watching these young riders progress. It’s a terrific career and I enjoy coming to work every day.” Cunneff smiled, as she turned and reminded Winter to keep her shoulders back as Poker glided over the fences a second time.last_img read more

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‘Saturday can’t come quickly enough!’ – Wes Morgan on Leicester’s title win

first_img1 Wes Morgan will collect the Premier League trophy this weekend Wes Morgan hailed Leicester’s remarkable Barclays Premier League title triumph as the best feeling of his career.The Foxes were crowned top-flight champions for the first time in the club’s history after Tottenham were held to a 2-2 draw by Chelsea on an evening of high drama at Stamford Bridge.Leicester captain Morgan was watching events unfold at striker Jamie Vardy’s house with a number of his team-mates as the party turned to delirium at the final whistle.Christian Fuchs was also among the guests and the Austria international posted a video on Twitter showing the group celebrating wildly as the title was confirmed.Robert Huth, Shinji Okazaki and plenty of others also shared the moment while a number of supporters gathered outside the gates of Vardy’s house.Former Nottingham Forest defender Morgan, though, managed to reflect on a stunning season which has seen the 5,000-1 outsiders upset the odds.“It’s the best feeling of my career and I couldn’t be prouder that it’s as part of this team,” he said.“Everyone’s worked so hard for this, nobody believed we could do it, but here we are, Premier League champions and deservedly so.“I’ve never known a spirit like the one between these boys, we’re like brothers. People saw it last season when everyone expected us to be relegated, but we fought back to prove people wrong. This season’s been a continuation of that. We’ve built on the momentum, but I don’t think anyone believed it would come to this.”He added of receiving the trophy against Everton at the weekend: “Saturday can’t come quickly enough. I can’t wait to get my hands on the trophy.”last_img read more

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Brain Provides Shortcuts for the Will

first_imgThe brain is like a smart assistant, allowing previously-learned actions to be called up on demand.A typist flies over the keyboard without error. A pianist executes a rapid passage of a piano concerto flawlessly. A gymnast executes a dozen complex somersaults and flips in a tumbling run. Thank goodness they don’t have to think about each move.In an article titled “How the brain prepares for movement and actions” on The Conversation, Myrto Mantziara from Bangor University describes how humans and primates are able to store a sequence of moves and execute them in rapid-fire succession. The code for each move in the sequence is stored simultaneously, but the activation potential determines the order in which they will be executed. This is called “simultaneous planning” and “competitive queueing.” It’s competitive because each move competes for the highest activation potential; after the previous move is executed, the move with the next highest activation potential moves up in the queue. This is how a simultaneous code becomes a sequence.Participants were trained to associate dot patterns with finger actions, and then perform them the next day.Looking at the brain signals, the team was able to distinguish participants’ neural patterns as they planned and executed the movements. The researchers found that, milliseconds before the start of the movement, all the finger presses were queued and “stacked” in an ordered manner. The activation pattern of the finger presses reflected their position in the sequence that was performed immediately after. This competitive queuing pattern showed that the brain prepared the sequence by organising the individual actions in the correct order.The researchers also looked at whether this preparatory queuing activity was shared across different sequences which had different rhythms or different finger orders, and found that it was. The competitive queuing mechanism acted as a template to guide each action into a position, and provided the base for the accurate production of new sequences. In this way the brain stays flexible and efficient enough to be ready to produce unknown combinations of sequences by organising them using this preparatory template.Voice Activation in the BrainThe voice is key to making sense of the words in our brain (Medical Xpress). Another capability of the brain is to extract information from the tone of speech beyond the mere words. Imagine a sentence read by a monotone speech synthesizer. Now imagine it read with all the expressiveness of a Shakesperean actor. As epigenetics is to genetics, vocal inflection is to simple words in a dictionary. Think of how many ways you can pronounce “all right” to express a wealth of emotional information beyond what the words mean in a dictionary. New experiments confirm what we all know from experience.Now, a study by the Basque Center on Cognition, Brain and Language (BCBL) in San Sebastian concludes that sound waves effectively transmit information beyond the lexical meaning of words. This research, published online in the Journal of Memory and Language, has proven that words carry information indexed through the voice.Led by Efthymia Kapnoula, the paper determines that the meaning we give to words is conditioned by factors that are not simply limited to lexical information. People, and more specifically their voices, have much to say in the mental representation of words.Hear them roar: How humans and chickadees understand each other (Science Daily). This ability to extract information from the voice is not limited to humans. Any dog owner knows that the family pet can tell a lot about mood without understanding the words, just by the type of expression. Fear, excitement, or other types of arousal come through the tone of voice, say researchers at the University of Alberta. Even little birds in the yard can tell the emotional state of not only humans, but other animals. As they showed, this capability comes built into the brain.Under the supervision of Professor Chris Sturdy, Congdon conducted two experiments, one examining chickadees and another examining humans. In the experiments, participants distinguished between high- and low-arousal vocalizations produced by other species, including alligators, chickadees, elephants, humans, pandas, piglets, ravens, macaques, and tree frogs. Human subjects were able to identify high arousal in different species.“Black-capped chickadees were also able to identify high arousal in other chickadees, humans, and giant pandas,” said Congdon. “This is fascinating, because a chickadee that has never come across a giant panda before is able to categorize high — and low — arousal vocalizations.“The little birds could not have evolved this ability, because they never encountered giant pandas before. It must be part of the software package in the brain, like bundled apps that are included in a smartphone. Our brains use the apps, but the decision to use an app requires the will of a non-material being. Neurosurgeon Michael Egnor takes on materialism and supports dualism (i.e., that the mind is distinct from the body) in two interviews on ID the Future: Part 1 and Part 2.In a very interesting video on YouTube, Dr Randy Guliuzza of ICR goes into more detail about the human hand in mind/body coordination. During typewriting or piano playing, the brain has to respond within a fraction of an eyeblink’s time to send the right information down the arm for the next letter or note in the sequence. Guliuzza also shares unique features of the human hand not present in chimpanzees or other primates. We are unique in the biosphere in many ways; “fearfully and wonderfully made” like it says in Psalm 139. Are you thankful for your hardware and software endowments? Are you using them for good?See biographies of some 50 scientists who believed in intelligent design, not evolution.(Visited 259 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Selling Evolution with Cuteness

first_imgArtificial selection is not natural selection. Darwin addicts cannot keep that distinction straight.Who can’t resist the sad, pleading eyes of a pet dog? Those eyes, with your dog’s nuzzle on your lap, call out for a treat, or a piece of your meal. But is this evolution?Look at the headlines: “Dogs evolved a special muscle that lets them make puppy dog eyes,” says New Scientist. A casual reader will start having visions of Darwin.Human selection has resulted in dogs evolving more expressive faces. They have a facial muscle for making the “puppy dog eyes” that melt many peoples’ hearts that does not exist in wolves – the ancestors of dogs.This muscle allows dogs to lift up their inner “eyebrow”, which makes their eye look larger. This makes them look more like childlike and also rather sad – the puppy dog eyes look.It really does make dogs more appealing to us. In 2013, Juliane Kaminski at the University of Portsmouth and colleagues videotaped dogs interacting with strangers at a shelter to see what made them more likely to be adopted.And yet this is clearly a case of artificial selection, what the writer called “human selection.” People caused the change, just like they did with all the other extreme attributes in dogs. Collies have long snouts; bulldogs have short snouts. Dachshunds have short legs, greyhounds have long legs. “Kaminski thinks this muscle evolved because people favoured dogs that make this expression.” The misleading headline says that “dogs evolved” this change.The press release from the University of Portsmouth makes the same error:Co-author and anatomist Adam Hartstone-Rose, at North Carolina State University, USA, said: “These muscles are so thin that you can literally see through them – and yet the movement that they allow seems to have such a powerful effect that it appears to have been under substantial evolutionary pressure. It is really remarkable that these simple differences in facial expression may have helped define the relationship between early dogs and humans.”Co-author Rui Diogo, an anatomist at Howard University, Washington DC, USA, said: “I must admit that I was surprised to see the results myself because the gross anatomy of muscles is normally very slow to change in evolution, and this happened very fast indeed, in just some dozens of thousands of years.”The “evolutionary pressure,” though, was caused by humans – not by unguided nature. The scientists admit that humans can cause changes like this in a very short time. That’s exactly what happened with all the other dog breeds, from pit bulls to poodles. Humans select the traits they desire for various purposes: huskies for sledding, greyhounds for racing, sheepdogs for herding sheep. Intentional breeding can cause major changes in short order.New Scientist claims that the muscle that lifts the eyes “does not exist in wolves – the ancestors of dogs.” But the press release says it does not “consistently exist” in wolves. If it exists, humans can accentuate it throw artificial selection. That’s intelligent design, not Darwinian evolution. No new genetic information was created out of nothing.More evidence that Darwinians use propaganda to promote their theory. We can’t let them get away with it. This has nothing to do with Darwinian evolution, but they keep giving “evolution” credit for everything.Exercise: Go to the Baloney Detector and see how many tactics were used in this story. (Visited 103 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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