Can YOU Fix The NBA Draft

By Jody Avirgan The NBA draft could use some fixing. Whether NBA Commissioner Adam Silver admits it or not, teams are tanking in order to land a better chance at a top pick. On the most recent episode of our sports podcast Hot Takedown, we discussed a few proposals to fix the draft structure, from the “wheel” to closing the gap between the worst and second-worst team’s chances. Now, it’s your turn.When you’re sitting on your couch, daydreaming, what crazy scheme have you come up with to fix the draft structure? Tell us below — no idea is too weird. We’ll compile some of them on FiveThirtyEight and discuss our favorites on the show.We’ll also endorse one idea as the official Hot Takedown proposal and send it as a notarized letter (on fancy paper, too) to Silver. And that’ll solve everything! Embed Code More: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS | Embed read more

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Commentary Opposing coaches paint picture of uncertain Ohio State mens basketball

In college basketball, and, perhaps, college sports in general, it’s the coaches from the smaller and less-known schools that are the most candid, and maybe the most truthful, too. It can be interesting and fun to hear a re-telling of the team you pay attention to through the mouth of opposing coaches. For Ohio State men’s basketball, the two coaches to most recently oppose the Buckeyes on the hardwood are the only two that have gotten it correct in their recounting of OSU hoops. The next two coaches after them could complete the picture of Buckeyes basketball in 2012. OSU’s season began with an 82-60 win against the Albany Great Danes. Albany coach Will Brown provided a season’s worth of lavish praise and hyperbole in the game by lauding OSU’s depth as well as starting junior guard Aaron Craft. “My guys go to McDonald’s to eat, they (OSU) have McDonald’s All-Americans coming off the bench,” Brown said of OSU’s depth before moving discussing Craft. “He’s (Craft) going to be in the NBA for 10 years, I’m sure,” Brown said. As the season has gone along, OSU has continued to receive acclaim for its convincing wins. The University of Kansas City-Missouri came to the Schottenstein Center on Nov. 23 and was sent packing with a 91-45 loss. Afterward, UMKC coach Matt Brown simply said that OSU is “a terrific team.” It would be fair to say that OSU was at least a somewhat unknown commodity prior to its first true non-conference test of the year at Duke on Nov. 28. The 73-68 loss at a rowdy Cameron Indoor Stadium was a kind of reassurance that the Buckeyes could hold their own against top competition. Upon returning home, OSU greeted more mediocre teams. The first was Northern Kentucky, another inferior out-of-conference foe that the Buckeyes throttled and in turn had more praise heaped upon them. Following his team’s 70-43 loss, Northern Kentucky coach Dave Bezold said it was a “great experience” for his players to just be on the same floor with the Buckeyes. “It is an absolutely tremendous opportunity for us to play with one of the most historical teams in the country,” Bezold said. “It is a special moment for our kids to be on this floor and play against such a great program.” Relative to other coaches that came to The Schott and were dealt a swift defeat, Savannah State coach Horace Broadnax was calculated in his post game remarks after the Buckeyes beat his Tigers, 85-45 on Wednesday. Broadnax had plenty to say about the game, but what stuck out was that he stopped at saying OSU was decent. That was it, nothing more. In OSU’s next game, all visiting UNC-Asheville did in its 90-72 loss on Saturday was end the Buckeyes’ streak of 14 consecutive non-conference home wins by at least 20 points. By comparison, Duke lost by 22 points last season at The Schott. Asheville coach Eddie Biedenbach also had measured praise for OSU, stating that he thinks fellow Big Ten team Indiana still plays harder than the Buckeyes. “I think Ohio State is one of the top 6 teams in the country, it’s a little early talent wise,” Biedenbach said. “Indiana… I don’t think they’re more talented than Ohio State – I think they play harder.” After seven games, and a flatbed truck’s worth of homage paid to OSU coach Thad Matta’s program by opposing coaches, Broadnax and Biedenbach finally arrived at the accurate depiction of Buckeyes basketball – the jury’s still out about this team. If there is such a thing as a decent, or “blah” No. 7-ranked squad, OSU has to be that, as Broadnax said. And like Biedenbach said, OSU is a top team in the country and in the Big Ten, but, unlike last season’s Final Four team, there appears to be a gulf between America’s very best squads and the Buckeyes. The 2012 Buckeyes haven’t been tested with the frequency of the 2011 team, which played Florida in the second game of the season before hosting Duke in game No. 7. It certainly hasn’t been as successful either: The 2011 Buckeyes won both of those games whereas the 2012 Buckeyes came close at Duke and the team is now receiving only lukewarm praise from coaches of the mid-majors it beats soundly.  Next up is Winthrop, which upset Ohio University this past weekend, and Saturday is OSU’s marquee non-conference home match against Kansas. A win against Kansas changes the trajectory for the Buckeyes, or at least the outside perception of that trajectory.  Two losses in the big non-conference games doesn’t necessarily condemn OSU to a failed season, and certainly doesn’t rule the team out from a deep NCAA Tournament run. However, there was something about the way OSU fought for a win in a tight game against Florida last season, and then the way it cruised past Duke, that seemed to announce its intentions and demand recognition.  Two losses against Duke and Kansas this year? That only seems to demand recognition as a team that isn’t quite ready. So, listen to what Kansas coach Bill Self has to say after Saturday’s game – depending on the outcome and how the game goes down, you’ll likely hear comments that complete the picture of the 2012 Buckeyes. read more

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Urban Meyer Nick Saban matchup brings memories of past meetings between Ohio

Left: Coach Urban Meyer hoists the Amos Alonzo Stagg Big Ten Championship trophy after the Big Ten Championship Game against Wisconsin on Dec. 6 in Indianapolis. OSU won, 59-0.Credit: Chelsea Spears / Multimedia editorRight: Alabama coach Nick Saban hoists the trophy following a 42-14 win against Notre Dame in the BCS National Championship game at Sun Life Stadium on Jan. 7, 2013, in Miami Gardens, Fla.Credit: Courtesy of TNSPaul “Bear” Bryant and Wayne Woodrow “Woody” Hayes.The first time the Ohio State Buckeyes and Alabama Crimson Tide took the field against each other, the two legendary coaches squared off in a battle for the — wait for it — Sugar Bowl championship in New Orleans.Now, almost 37 years to the date, two more legendary football coaches will roam the sidelines in the 2015 installment of the Sugar Bowl.While they don’t have nicknames like “Woody” or “Bear,” OSU’s Urban Meyer and Alabama’s Nick Saban know each other all too well. They’ve squared off three times as members of the Southeastern Conference when Meyer was at the University of Florida and are set to meet again in a College Football Playoff semi-final game in the first season of the new system.Saban said during a Sunday conference call that returning to the Sugar Bowl for a second year in a row is a “great opportunity,” especially against the Buckeyes.“(It’s) a real honor for our team to be able to come back to the Sugar Bowl, to be a part of the first-ever playoff system playing against an outstanding, very traditional, a great traditioned program like Ohio State, with a great coach like Urban Meyer,” Saban said.Meyer, who is 1-2 against Saban head-to-head, said he can remember his lone win against Saban.“The 2008 game was just one of the great games in college football history, in my opinion,” Meyer said Sunday. “Where evenly matched teams were going back and forth, back and forth. And obviously we got, scored right at the end to take a two-score lead.”Meyer’s Florida Gators defeated Saban’s Crimson Tide, 31-20, in that game to earn a spot in the 2009 BCS National Championship, which they won over the Oklahoma Sooners.Combined, the two coaches have recorded six national titles, a far cry from the combined 11 that Hayes and Bryant combined for in their coaching careers.Adding to the intrigue is the fact that both Saban and Meyer were not only OSU assistants in the 1980s, but also both played their college football in Ohio with Saban at Kent State and Meyer at Cincinnati.Meyer, who was a graduate assistant at OSU from 1986-87, coached his first game against the Crimson Tide, a 16-10 loss.Just six years prior, Saban was on the same Buckeye staff as a defensive backs coach under then-head coach and Meyer mentor Earle Bruce.During a fundraiser in Mason, Ohio, back in April, Saban spoke about one particular coach who made an impact on him when he was an up-and-coming football coach.In Saban’s second year at OSU, the unranked Buckeyes entered a game against Michigan in Ann Arbor, Mich., as significant underdogs with the Wolverines ranked No. 7 in the nation.Saban said Hayes, less than three years removed from his final game at OSU, came back for the first time to address the team.“He came to Senior Tackle and he talked to the team and he says, ‘You can have no great victories in life unless you can overcome adversity. The War in the Pacific was the greatest military victory of all time because of Pearl Harbor, and the adversity we had to overcome because of that,’” Saban told Cleveland.com. “We won the game, 14-9, you can look it up, and they didn’t score a touchdown.”Now, all these years later, the Buckeyes are once again facing adversity.During a 42-28 victory over Michigan, redshirt-freshman quarterback and then-Heisman hopeful J.T. Barrett fractured his ankle, forcing the Buckeyes to go to their third-string quarterback, redshirt-sophomore Cardale Jones.A day later, OSU learned that missing teammate Kosta Karageorge had been found dead off-campus from what police said was a potentially self-inflicted gunshot wound.Despite all of that, OSU was able to dismantle the Wisconsin Badgers in the 2014 Big Ten Championship Game, 59-0, catapulting the Buckeyes into the first-ever College Football Playoff.Through the crazy ride that has been the 2014 season, senior cornerback Doran Grant said Sunday that the strides the Buckeyes have made are because of this year’s challenges.“Handling the adversity, just coming together as a group. I feel the same way because I think we improved a lot because of how close we became over every week,” Grant said. “Overcome the obstacles, adversity, and we just remained together. And I think that’s a big part of our improvement.”Grant will now be faced with a challenge of his own, as he will likely be matched up with Heisman finalist and junior Alabama wide receiver Amari Cooper.Cooper ranks second in the nation in receiving yards with 1,656 to go along with 14 touchdowns. His 115 receptions equal exactly half of Alabama starting senior quarterback Blake Sims’ completions.Grant said while he isn’t sure what the game plan is for the Crimson Tide just yet, he knows what to expect from Cooper.“I know he’s a great receiver. A very polished receiver. He has big play ability. Looking forward to the matchup, honestly,” Grant said. “Not sure how we’re gonna handle everything, but looking forward to going against a great team period.”While Grant isn’t looking at film on Cooper just yet, Meyer did say he might look at some film from some of his previous matchups against Saban.“We’ll probably look at the last two. Or maybe we will.  Because our offense has adapted and changed somewhat, but I think I always like to go back and see because a lot of times there’s some fundamentals or coverage concepts or front concepts that we’ll look at,” Meyer said. “That will be mostly on that side of the ball that I’ll check out a little bit what they did in the past. But that’s about it.”While Meyer has beaten Saban before, the Buckeyes currently hold a 0-3 record against the Crimson Tide all time, something OSU will look to improve upon as it is set to take on Alabama on New Year’s Day in the Allstate Sugar Bowl for a chance to play for a national championship at 8:30 p.m. read more

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2nd Annual Cinco de Mayo celebration in Balboa Park expands

first_img2nd Annual Cinco de Mayo celebration in Balboa Park expands KUSI Newsroom April 30, 2019 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – The Cinco de Mayo Celebration in Balboa Park is expanding to bring even more Mexican-themed music and dance performances, arts and crafts, and family-friendly activities.This year’s celebration once again features colorful horseback riders, traditional dance groups, a fashion show, strolling mariachis, hands-on activity booths for kids, authentic arts and crafts demonstrations by artisans from Mexico, food trucks, and a free concert event featuring Jarabe Mexicano, according to organizers.Celebrations begins Saturday, May 4, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. within both the historic Plaza de Panama and Spreckels Organ Pavilion.Saturday, May 4, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Set within both the historic Plaza de Panama and Spreckels Organ Pavilion.Entertainment Schedule:11:10-11:20 amOpening Ceremony in the Plaza de Panama11:20-11:40 amLa Fiesta Danzantes de San Diego: A 20-minute ballet folklorico performance in the Spreckels Organ Pavilion of the popular community-based dance group, featuring traditional dances from Jalisco, Veracruz, Chiapas, and the revolutionary period.11:25-11:40 amMariachi Victoria de San Diego: Performance of mariachi music in the Plaza de Panama before accompanying the horseback procession at 12 noon. Mariachi Victoria is part of the City Heights Music School.12 noon-1 pmEquestrian Procession: Four traditionally attired horseback riders from the Escaramuza Charra las Golondrinas and Asociación Charros Herencia Charra travel from the Botanical Building into the Plaza de Panama. The procession will be led by floreador Miguel Jr Bautista performing rope tricks.12:40-1 pmLa Fiesta Danzantes de San Diego: A 20-minute ballet folklorico dance performance in the Spreckels Organ Pavilion.1:10-1:40 pmMariachi Victoria de San Diego: Strolling mariachi music in the Plaza de Panama and along the El Prado walkway.1:15-2:15 pmTraditional Mexican Dress Showcase: A fashion show in the Spreckels Organ Pavilion of traditional attire created by indigenous women from diverse regions of Mexico, including San Luis Potosi, Michoacán, Jalisco, Tlaxcala, Oaxaca, Guerrero, Chiapas, and Yucatán, all from Olga de la Vega’s “Weavers of Dreams” private collection.2-2:45 pm3:15-4 pmParis Escovedo Band: Performance of Latin-flavored jazz by the international recording artist in the Plaza de Panama.2:30-2:50 pm3:10-3:30 pmWa-Kushmá Mexican Folk Production: Performances in the Spreckels Organ Pavilion of traditional folk dances from Oaxaca, Chihuahua, Jalisco, and Baja California, featuring up to a dozen dance couples.4:45-5 pmSan Diego State University Marching Aztecs Drumline: Performance on the Plaza de Panama stage by the 20-member drumline followed by a procession to the Spreckels Organ Pavilion and participation in a performance of the US and Mexico national anthems there at 5 pm.5:05-6:30 pmCinco de Mayo Concert with Jarabe Mexicano: Jarabe Mexicano performs contemporary and traditional Mexican music on the Spreckels Organ Pavilion stage. Jarabe Mexicano is sponsored by the Kiwanis Club of San Diego. KUSI Newsroom, center_img Updated: 12:37 PM Posted: April 30, 2019 Categories: Good Morning San Diego, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

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Celebrating literature through writing

first_imgIn an attempt to encourage youngsters to indulge in writing and enhance their writing skills, Sahitya Akademi has organised its annual Festival of Letters in the national Capital. The third day of the festival comprised of a programme titled Yuva Sahiti, which is devoted to young writing across India. The festival, which began on Tuesday, saw Dr K. Sreenivasarao, Secretary, Sahitya Akademi, welcoming the dignitaries and young writers from all over the country along with other participants. He talked about the importance of the role that the youth plays in all civilisations and observed that it is young people who are the drivers of change. Along with this, he also highlighted several programmes, schemes and projects that the Akademi has in place exclusively for the young writers/poets/translators across the country in addition to the Yuva Puraskar. Professor Sukrita Paul Kumar, eminent Indian English poet and critic, delivered the inaugural speech and elaborated the process of creative writing for the benefit of young writers. Dr Vishwanath Prasad Tiwari, President, Sahitya Akademi, talked about the value of young writing and urged the youth of the country to take up writing seriously. Noted young poets and writers from all over the country participated in the programme. The day also witnessed the meeting of Award winners – Writers’ Meet. All the Award winners shared their experiences, the process of creative writing, approaches to life in general, the place of writing in the society and future of literature etc. Samvatsar lecture by Dr Chandrashekhar Dharmadhikari, distinguished jurist and eminent Gandhi scholar, was the concluding event of the day. Dr Dharmadhikari talked at length about the fast vanishing value systems in our societies, the troubled lives of modern, industrialised world and core values of the individuals. Dr Dharmadhikari also pointed out that instead of us using technology, it is technology that is driving us and bringing home many a new illness.last_img read more

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