Detroit’s historically black St. Matthew’s added to ‘Freedom Network’

first_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York By Pat McCaughanPosted Feb 25, 2016 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Belleville, IL Press Release Service Rector Knoxville, TN February 27, 2016 at 10:44 am I think I heard that when John Brown came to Detroit to meet with community leaders, shortly before his raid at Harper’s Ferry, the meeting was held at St. Matthews. Is this true? Adrienne Sellers says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Bath, NC April 21, 2017 at 7:48 pm My family were members of old St. Matthew’s Church. My great great grandmother’s name was Louise Tomlinson, as was my great grandmother’ name was Louisa. her maiden name was Hulette, born in Ft. Erie, Ontario. My grandmother’s name was Clara Tomlinson Boston, she was married to William Boston, a popular undertaker. My mother’s name was Julia Sellers. I remember many stories about St. Matthew’s, the tea’s, the help to escaped slaves , King’s Daughter’s Group, the stories about the Underground Railroad, Mr. Lambert, William his grandson, old Greek Town at First Baptist Church as the last station of the Underground Railroad. Submit a Press Release Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL March 12, 2016 at 1:57 pm Great article that should be widely read throughout the country, particularly during Black History month, and thereafter. Thanks be to God for the faithful at St. Matthews” yet “carrying on” and still endeavoring to “lift up Christ”, serve the community, and make a positive impact in the city of Detroit, and in the lives of persons there; while still striving for freedom, favor, shared resources, and dignity for all persons wherever regardless of class, color or convictions. Director of Music Morristown, NJ Detroit’s historically black St. Matthew’s added to ‘Freedom Network’ National Park Service recognizes 170-year-old congregation’s Underground Railroad activism Joe Summers says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Tampa, FL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 [Episcopal News Service] Before Harriet Tubman escaped slavery, before Abraham Lincoln was elected to Congress and before Harriet Beecher Stowe wrote Uncle Tom’s Cabin, members of St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church were helping slaves escape across the Detroit River to freedom in Canada.Founded in 1846 above a blacksmith’s shop, St. Matthew’s is among the oldest historically black congregations in the Episcopal Church and in the nation, and was a center of local abolitionist activism and community organizing.Yet that aspect of the church’s past went relatively unrecognized until 2015, when the National Park Service added St. Matthew’s to its National Network to Freedom.“We found that it (St. Matthew’s) makes a significant contribution to the understanding of the Underground Railroad in American history … (and we) commend you on your dedication to this important aspect of our history,” Diane Miller, network national program manager, wrote in a June 4 letter announcing the award of the designation.Senior Warden Philip Carrington, the Rev. Canon Robert W. Alltop, Dr. Richard E Smith and Junior Warden ​Rudolph Markoe.For fourth-generation St. Matthew’s parishioner Dr. Richard E. Smith, who applied for the status, the quest to highlight the church’s storied past was a labor of love and long overdue. For nearly two decades, he wove together details of its proud history of community service and social activism.“We always heard bits and pieces about the church’s history, but there was no written record,” Smith told the Episcopal News Service recently.A time capsule offers a past and future glimpse The unearthing of a time capsule in 1998, planted by church members some 70 years earlier at the site of the congregation’s second location at St. Antoine and Elizabeth Streets, yielded a written record of what previously had been oral history passed among generations, he said.It also offered a glimpse into the city’s past. Those documents became part of the permanent collection of the Charles Wright Museum of African American History in Detroit, Smith said.“As a doctor, I deal in facts,” said Smith, an obstetrician-gynecologist, and vice president of Henry Ford Hospital Physician Outreach. “I began gathering information to put into a timeline for the church, along with family history and other information.”The Rev. William Monroe helped organize St. Matthew’s as a mission congregation.Among other significant events, Smith’s timeline reveals that:Nine years after Michigan became the 26th state in the union, 13 years after slavery was abolished in Canada and nearly 40 years after slavery was abolished in Michigan, St. Matthew’s was organized as a mission congregation by the Rev. William Monroe and local businessman William Lambert, who served as warden.Two years later, Lambert was elected a delegate to the National Convention of Colored Citizens held in Cleveland, at which Frederick Douglass was elected convention president. The same year, a city lot at the corner of St. Antoine and Congress was purchased to build the church and taxes of $2.22 paid to the state and county for the church.Over the next decade, nearly 40,000 fugitive slaves would pass through Detroit under the support and guidance of Lambert and others, including other churches in the city. “Everyone was working together, helping one another,” Smith said.Roy Finkenbine, vice chair of the Michigan Freedom Trail Commission, said St. Matthew’s was one of three churches in Detroit’s pre-Civil War black community that actively aided freedom-seekers.William Lambert was the senior warden and found of St. Matthew’s.Lambert, known as “the father of St. Matthew’s,” founded the Colored Vigilant Committee, “essentially an all-purpose organization to help freedom-seekers get to Canada,” he said.“It was all black in membership. They worked with select whites in the city and on the fringes of the city who would filter people to the committee. They did everything from raising funds to feeding (and) clothing people, providing medical care, hiding them in barns on the east side (and) getting them across the river late at night in skiffs hidden under the docks. They even offered legal representation.“It was an illegal activity and one that was particularly dangerous after 1850,” he said.A surprising revelation for junior warden Rudolph Markoe, a second-generation and lifelong St. Matthew’s member, was finding out “that we didn’t actually have a building for a stretch of time because many people left for Canada and California because of the threat of kidnapping and arrest.”That was after the government passed the 1850 Fugitive Slave Act, another in a series of federal laws allowing for capture and return of runaway slaves, and harsh penalties imposed against the slaves and anyone who helped them. Enforcement of the law often facilitated kidnapping and enslaving of free people of color, prompting many to flee to Canada. The Rev. William Monroe emigrated to Liberia to establish an Episcopal mission. During that time, remaining St. Matthew’s members met at Christ Church Detroit, and their building was sold to a Jewish congregation, Shaary Zedek. The St. Matthew’s Mission Fund was established, pooling money to assist newcomers and later to build the next church.Other highlights of the church’s history include:In 1855, James Holly was ordained a deacon at St. Matthew’s, and he was the first of six clergy associated with the church to become bishops in the Episcopal Church, according to Smith. Holly was consecrated the first black bishop in the Episcopal Church and founded the Episcopal Church in Haiti, the largest missionary diocese in the Episcopal Church. Others include the Rt. Revs. G. Mott Williams; Quintin Primo Jr.; Orris Walker Jr.; Arthur Williams and Irving Mayson.The mission revived in the 1880s, at another site near downtown Detroit, and became “the center for improvement and service clubs.” By 1906 St. Matthew’s was so popular it had to limit participants, according to Smith. A year later, the church attained parish status.After the turn of the century, the Detroit chapter of the NAACP was established at and met at St. Matthew’s.During the 1920s then-rector the Rev. Evard Daniel continued as a trendsetter, developing a relationship with automaker Henry Ford and facilitating the hiring of many African Americans for factory work during “the Great Migration” of blacks from the South. Located in Detroit’s “Paradise Valley,” a business and entertainment hub, church membership was reportedly 800 communicants, with 300 children in its Sunday school, according to a Dec. 11, 1926, Detroit Free Press article.Donors included Clara Ford, spouse of automaker Henry Ford and an occasional worshipper at the church.In 1926, Marian Anderson performed her first Detroit concert at the Nov. 1 dedication of St. Matthew’s new parish house; the time capsule was placed in the cornerstone. The famed opera singer returned in 1939 for a repeat performance at St. Matthew’s, after being barred from Constitution Hall by the Daughters of the American Revolution.Markoe also underscored the church’s involvement as an early meeting place for the NAACP and its social activism in the 1925 landmark trial of Dr. Ossian Sweet, whose wife, Gladys Mitchell, was an active St. Matthew’s member.“They sponsored fundraisers to raise money for Clarence Darrow to come and defend Sweet,” he said. In a case considered to be one of the most important civil rights trials of that decade, Darrow successfully defended Sweet, a black medical doctor, against murder charges after a crowd threatened to eject Sweet from the all-white neighborhood where he had purchased a home. During the scuffle, someone in the crowd was shot and killed.Sweet’s acquittal was considered a milestone decision in asserting the rights of blacks to defend their person and property.In 1940, the Rev. Ricksford Meyers was called as rector of the church; his wife, Dr. Marjorie Peebles-Meyers, became the first African American woman to graduate from the Wayne State University Medical School and to integrate many local hospitals.Urban renewal, a new location and a mergerSweeping urban renewal and social change impacted the congregation over the next several decades. New freeway construction displaced Detroit’s Paradise Valley; church membership dwindled.St. Matthew’s and St. Joseph’s merged in 1971 and is known affectionately as “Matty-Joes.”Yet the tradition of social activism remained intact; clergy participated in 1960s civil rights demonstrations locally and nationally. In 1971, because of declining membership and economic challenges, St. Matthew’s merged with and relocated to St. Joseph’s Church in the mid-city area of Detroit.“It was a melding of two communities of faith, each with their own unique identities that worked together and made it a fascinating place,” according to the Rev. Kenneth Near, who has served at the church. St. Joseph’s was a center of anti-Vietnam War activism, he said.In 1998, the former church building was razed to make way for the construction of Ford Field, the home of the Detroit Lions professional football team; the time capsule was removed and opened. Also removed was a city-designated historic plaque.Finkenbine said receiving the National Park Service Freedom Network designation “for something like the Underground Railroad says something, particularly in the case of churches, about who and what an organization wants to be. The fact that people were taking a chance to assist people in need, that they were willing to put a higher law above the national law, says something about those folks. The desire to recognize that as part of your heritage says something about the institution today and how the institution wants to operate and to work with issues today.”St. Matthew’s continues “hands-on ministry” with a Sunday morning breakfast program that feeds about 60 and other ministries “geared toward assisting or lending a hand or step up to people who, for whatever reason, have fallen on hard times or can’t quite navigate through life’s problems,” Markoe said.He said he learned the church’s history “in doses through the years,” through the work of others, such as the late Lillian Southern, the church historian who died in January 2015, and through Smith.“It makes you feel a certain pride … a certain responsibility to keep that tradition going because people long before me saw a need and were committed to changing it.”The Union of Black Episcopalians National President Annette Buchanan said, “St. Matthews stands in the great tradition of our historically black churches, many of whom were born out of the struggle for racial justice.“On Feb. 13 as we commemorated the feast day of blessed Absalom Jones, our first black priest, and his founding of our first black Episcopal church, St. Thomas African Episcopal Church, we appreciate the foundation that he laid of community outreach, advocacy, and evangelism which St. Matthews has proudly perpetuated.“The Black Episcopal Church has been and will continue to be the conscience of our denomination reminding us of our baptismal covenant to respect the dignity of every human being.”Finkenbine said it is extremely important to have historically African American churches recognized on the Network for Freedom “because all too frequently nothing of them remains in local communities. Many institutions have disappeared off the landscape over the 150 years since the Underground Railroad ended. Those churches which are still active and exist like St. Matthew’s have to carry the water, be symbolic of all that larger area of work that black communities and black churches did to help bring freedom.”St. Matthew’s 1880-1971 photo taken taken circa 1945.Smith agreed. His quest to uncover and to gain recognition of the St. Matthew’s story intersected with the stories of his own and other families, he said.“My family is one of the oldest in Michigan; we were a part of a family group of freedom-seekers, black settlers who left Fredericksburg, Virginia, about 1845,” he told ENS. “For as far back as I remember, I heard stories of the Underground Railroad.”His interest peaked after a relative gave him the family’s “original 1803 ‘free papers’ from Virginia,” he said. “In my efforts to document our history, I also researched the stories I heard about St. Matthew’s early history. I was further energized with the opening of the time capsule from the church building on St. Antoine.”During his research he was inspired to press on by the words of co-founder Lambert:“We hold our liberty more dearly than we do our lives, and we will organize and prepare ourselves with determination: live or die, sink or swim, we will never be taken back into slavery.“We will never voluntarily separate ourselves from the slave population in the country, for they are our fathers and mothers, and sisters and brothers; their interest, their wrongs and their sufferings are ours. The injuries inflicted on them are alike inflicted on us. Therefore, it is our duty to aid and assist them in their attempts to obtain their liberty.”– The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. Rector Washington, DC Comments are closed. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Collierville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA center_img July 12, 2016 at 10:57 am No it isn’t. The meeting was held at the home of William Webb, which was CLOSE to the original site of St. Matthews. But the meeting was held in Webb’s home, not the church. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Shreveport, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit an Event Listing Raleigh Daniel Hairston, D.Min. says: Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Racial Justice & Reconciliation Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Albany, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Tags Comments (4) The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Events Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Jamon Jordan says: last_img read more

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Soybean Growers Push Congress to Take Up and Pass TPA

first_img Facebook Twitter The groups also cited the impressive economic multiplier effect and job creation of farm and food exports, “Every $1 in U.S. farm exports is estimated to stimulate an additional $1.27 in business activity… Exports of $152.5 billion in fiscal 2014 therefore generated another $194 billion in economic activity in the U.S., bringing the total benefit to the economy to $347 billion.” Home Indiana Agriculture News Soybean Growers Push Congress to Take Up and Pass TPA SHARE Previous articleCattleFax Predicts Strong Prices to Remain in 2015Next articleIndiana Weather Forecast 2/6/2015 Gary Truitt “Every $1 billion of U.S. agricultural exports,” continued the groups, “… requires the full-time work of approximately 6,600 Americans throughout the economy. Exports in fiscal 2014 therefore supported over 1 million full-time jobs.” The groups used the opportunity to illustrate the significant benefits of trade to the domestic farm sector. “As a result of trade agreements implemented since 1989, when the U.S. began using bilateral and regional trade agreements to open foreign markets to our goods, U.S. agricultural exports have nearly quadrupled in value and now stand at a record $152.5 billion (fiscal 2014),” said the groups. “During that period, earnings from U.S. agricultural exports as a share of cash receipts to farmers have grown from 22 percent to over 35 percent.” The American Soybean Association (ASA), as part of a larger coalition of agriculture and food industry organizations, sent a letter this week to members of Congress encouraging them to support the immediate introduction and enactment of Trade Promotion Authority (TPA) legislation. ASA has a particularly valuable stake in global trade, as soybeans represent the largest American agricultural export.center_img In the letter, the groups pointed to TPA as a critical tool in establishing and expanding trade agreements with foreign partners, without undue legislative and bureaucratic barriers. Specifically cited were the ongoing negotiations over the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) and Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP). Facebook Twitter SHARE Soybean Growers Push Congress to Take Up and Pass TPA A full transcript of the letter and a list of signatories can be found here. By Gary Truitt – Feb 5, 2015 last_img read more

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DS News Webcast: Thursday 6/5/2014

first_img 2014-06-05 DSNews Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago About Author: DSNews Subscribe Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Previous: New Hampshire Foreclosure Outlook Largely Positive Next: Mortgage Master Welcomes Northern California Regional Manager Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago June 5, 2014 602 Views DS News Webcast: Thursday 6/5/2014 In a blog post, RealtyTrac VP Daren Blomquist analyzed nationwide data on home flipping over the last 12 months. He found that although total flipping was down in the first quarter of 2014 compared to a year ago, flippers are making bigger profits per flip. The average gross profit per flip in the first quarter of 2014 saw a 30 percent return on the initial purchase price, while gross profits increased year-over-year for a 28 percent return on investment. However, the total volume of flipped properties has declined from the previous year.Blomquist noted that 3.7 percent of all single-family homes sold this year were flips, compared to a 6.5 percent share of sales a year ago. The company said one of the most important factors in a successful and profitable home flip is how much work will need to be performed on the house in order to resell it at a higher margin. The top counties by gross return on investment in Q1 2014 include Prince George’s County, Maryland; York County, Pennsylvania; Baltimore, Maryland; Campbell County, Kentucky; and New Castle County, Delaware.In its latest Beige Book, the Federal Reserve noted economic activity has expanded in recent months, with the pace of growth characterized as moderate in the Boston, New York, Richmond, Chicago, Minneapolis, Dallas, and San Francisco Districts, yet modest in the remaining regions. Wednesday’s summary reinforces comments by Fed Chair Janet Yellen in which she forecast a faster pace of expansion as financial conditions remain supportive of growth in economic activity and employment. Share Save  Print This Postcenter_img The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Is Rise in Forbearance Volume Cause for Concern? 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago in Featured, Media, Webcasts Related Articles Home / Featured / DS News Webcast: Thursday 6/5/2014 Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days agolast_img read more

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U.S., Honduras to Test Disaster Response Software in Simulated Hurricane

first_img The GeoSHAPE solution comprises a web-based platform for creating, updating and sharing geospatially tagged events, as well as a mobile application for capturing data and photos in the field. Through these tools, organizations collaboratively create a picture of both the resources at hand and the extent of the damage. The availability of hospitals, helicopter landing zones, food, water and medical supplies, the condition of roads and bridges, and the deployment of rescue personnel to affected areas, among other key elements are plotted in a map that authorized users can see from anywhere in the world. The level of fidelity that this tool will offer will prevent redundancy of relief efforts, facilitate informed decision making among aid and resource planners, and alleviate congestion at logistical hubs. The development of GeoSHAPE is part of a technology project sponsored by the U.S. Department of Defense’s Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Emerging Capabilities and Prototyping and managed by the USSOUTHCOM Science, Technology and Experimentation Division. Other organizations involved in the program are the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC), the U.S. Department of State’s Humanitarian Information Unit, the Pacific Disaster Center, and LMN Solutions, an information technology company. Throughout the years, the relationship between USSOUTHCOM’s Science, Technology and Experimentation Division, JTF-B and Honduras’s COPECO has proven successful in the development and implementation of technologies such as the Pre-positioned Expeditionary Assistance Kits (PEAK), a modular system that provides potable water, renewable energy, situational awareness, as well as local and global communications to first responders during humanitarian assistance and disaster relief operations. After the final demonstration and evaluation in Honduras, if GeoSHAPE proves to add value to the response to disasters and humanitarian crises, it will be integrated with the Pacific Disaster Center’s DisasterAWARE platform, which provides continuously updated hazard information worldwide and functions as a hub for accessing, updating and sharing relevant data before, during and after a disaster. Since the software is open-source, through the Open-Geo Consortium, it will be available for integration by governmental and non-governmental organizations from all over the world. According to Hurtado, disaster relief and humanitarian assistance are only two of the many potential applications for the GeoSHAPE developed capability, which can also be used in any situation where individuals or organizations need to create and share geospatial information, such as peacekeeping missions and border security, as well as many others. Known as GeoSHAPE, the open-source, open-standard software, integrates data from multiple sources and displays it in a dynamic Internet-based map to provide situational awareness and facilitate the decision making process. “GeoSHAPE bridges the geospatial information sharing gaps we witnessed during the international response to the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, providing a tool for military and civil organizations, local and international, to efficiently coordinate their activities and, in turn, save more lives,” says Juan Hurtado, science advisor to the U.S. Southern Command (USSOUTHCOM). This two-year technology development effort will be put through the test during a simulated hurricane event impacting Central America and requiring a large multi-organizational response. Role players in this hypothetical scenario will include Honduras’ Permanent Contingency Commission (COPECO), the local Red Cross, Plan Internacional (local non-governmental organization) and U.S. Joint Task Force-Bravo (JTF-B), among other organizations that usually respond to these events. By Dialogo June 09, 2014center_img The United States and Honduras are joining efforts in Tegucigalpa and Soto Cano Air Base, June 9-12 to demonstrate and assess a mapping tool designed to revolutionize the way governmental and non-governmental organizations from all over the world collaborate in response to disasters and humanitarian crises. last_img read more

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LIRR’s Third Track Needs Full Support Now—No More Local Stops Down The Line

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York The time has come for Long Islanders to get all aboard the Long Island Rail Road’s third track proposal.As resurrected by Gov. Andrew Cuomo in his state of the state address in January, the third track would run along a 9.8-mile stretch between Floral Park and Hicksville that serves 107,000 riders on an average weekday. During peak times, the LIRR is forced to run trains in only one direction, which becomes a huge bottleneck whenever equipment breaks down or some other unforeseen delay arises. This main line expansion is intended to relieve that decades-old bottleneck. But almost as soon as the governor announced it, community opposition—especially within Floral Park—was galvanized.Given the project’s troubled history, the protesters had good reason to raise their voices, especially since many who owned homes along the main line feared that their properties would be condemned by the “big bad” New York State.Recently, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority released what’s known as scoping documents that say what will be included in the draft environmental impact statement, an important step in getting the once-estimated $1.5-billion project underway. While the final cost is still being calculated, the main aspects are clear. Essentially, the MTA is planning to plan.In its most recent iteration, the third track may not have as much impact on nearby residential properties as once was feared. Even better, the current project is expected to remain within the existing LIRR right-of-way and eliminate each of the seven grade crossings in the project’s corridor. This benefit alone is a sizable carrot to the municipalities protesting any expansion of the railroad. The MTA is also looking to require the acquisition of fewer than 10 commercial properties.As such, Long Island’s support for the third track should be a no-brainer—but only if the proper upgrades are made to the system in conjunction with the line expansion. These upgrades are needed to not only enhance the effectiveness of the third track project, but allow for the region to net the maximum benefits of other large-scale initiatives being undertaken by the LIRR such as East Side Access—now slated to be completed in 2023 (only 14 years later than first predicted and at $10.8 billion only $6.5 billion more than initially projected)—and the double track planned between Ronkonkoma and Farmingdale to relieve congestion in that heavily traveled line.Long Island’s future depends on its LIRR connection.“We talk about rebuilding our downtowns, locating affordable housing near train stations, and getting people out of cars and into trains,” said Long Island’s veteran planner, Lee Koppelman. “The simple truth is that in order to do all that, you need to improve the service. That’s where multiple tracking comes in.”Koppelman served 28 years as the first Suffolk County Planner, 41 years as the regional planner for Nassau and Suffolk, and now going on a decade as the executive director of the Center for Regional Policy Studies at Stony Brook University. Like so many of the other projects kicking around these days, Koppelman noted that the third track has been on the table for nearly 40 years.Koppelman would like to take the third track concept even further, calling for the electrification of the LIRR’s main line from Ronkonkoma east out to Calverton, as well as adding multiple tracking on the North Shore branches.The railroad is pushing hard for the third track because the East Side Access would bring the LIRR right under the East River and into Grand Central Terminal. That project’s completion would be truly transformative for the entire LIRR system. With East Side Access being the principal force behind a projected ridership increase of 27.5 percent within the next 30 years, the railroad is preparing the rest of the system for the residual demands. Adding the third track would have a huge impact.During the peak morning commute, there is no eastbound service for one and a half hours, while peak evening does not have westbound service for an hour. While the data for reverse commuting is ambiguous, the complete lack of reverse service on that line during peak times is troubling indeed.Also concerning are the seven locations in Nassau where the road meets the railroad. On a typical weekday more than 220 trains run along that track, and these crossing gates have to do their duty for each one that goes by. One industry insider told me that in New Hyde Park, they’re down 24 minutes out of every hour during peak times—and that’s an average, not when you’re stuck in a line of cars waiting for the gate to rise. The proposed overpasses should alleviate these commuting headaches and a compact redesign should reduce the project’s impact on the corridor.When the third track was last discussed seriously, beginning in 2005, the projected cost was $1.5 billion. By 2008, the project was essentially dead-on-arrival thanks to the large number of properties slated for condemnation, and not enough political will to see it through.The current iteration doesn’t have a final price tag yet, but Cuomo has made it clear that this project is a New York State priority. Fewer property purchases are required this time around, but more grade crossings are slated for elimination, so the cost will change. So far, $6.95 million was spent on related environmental studies. The third track’s completion is slated for some time in 2020. With the third track’s community outreach efforts modeled after those used by state officials during the new Tappan Zee bridge construction by hosting a series of community meetings, setting up a physical project center at the Mineola Train Station, and a sleek website, it seems the MTA and LIRR have learned the lessons of 2008.According to the scoping documents, the MTA estimates that construction should take “three to four years,” but Long Islanders know how these things often work out.In 2008, Carolyn Nardiello of The New York Times reported on the shifting justification behind the third track, as described by then-LIRR President Helena Williams. “The initial reason given for a third track was an increase in reverse commuting from Manhattan to Long Island. Mrs. Williams said that the railroad’s previous leadership thought that after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, businesses would relocate to Long Island and increase ridership. But that did not happen, and the railroad’s rationale for a third track changed—to that of relieving congestion on train lines.”Meanwhile, ridership continues to surge, during peak and off-peak commuting times. The claim that reverse commuting has risen is problematic. Since the best policy is data-driven, the LIRR should release the details rather than sharing anecdotal evidence. The projected job and economic impact figures released by the Long Island Index and other third-track project supporters such as the Long Island Association are attractive (if not at times a bit pie-in-the-sky), but weary residents will be most receptive to hearing how the third track will improve their daily commute and their quality of life.One cannot say the LIRR and MTA aren’t trying to win over their hearts and minds along the corridor this time around. Since the project was announced in January, officials met with village mayors, prospective commercial property owners who may be impacted, and area school boards. Local residents will get their turn to comment about the scoping of the DEIS in an upcoming series of meetings held in afternoons and evenings.Moving forward, it’s critical that both the MTA and LIRR communicate the tangible benefits of the third track to the daily riders who know its present shortcomings better than anyone. They should also clearly spell out how getting rid of those seven crossing grades will positively affect the community as well as the commuters.With good planning, the goal is a project that is regional in scope yet still local in implementation. The third track seems to hit both those notes. Let’s fast-track this project before it’s too late.Rich Murdocco writes about Long Island’s land use and real estate development issues. He received his Master’s in Public Policy at Stony Brook University, where he studied regional planning under Dr. Lee Koppelman, Long Island’s veteran master planner. Murdocco is a regular contributor to the Long Island Press. More of his views can be found on TheFoggiestIdea.org or follow him on Twitter @TheFoggiestIdea.last_img read more

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Nineteen dead, 139 infected with coronavirus in Iran: Health ministry

first_imgSeveral of Iran’s neighbors have closed their borders and banned flights from Iran due to fears over the virus, which could hurt the Islamic Republic’s already fragile economy.Kuwait, Iraq, Bahrain, Oman, Lebanon, the United Arab Emirates and Afghanistan have all reported cases of coronavirus involving people who traveled to Iran.President Hassan Rouhani said on Wednesday that coronavirus must not become an enemy weapon that prevents business in Iran, according to the official presidency website.Iran’s economy has been battered since the United States withdrew from a multilateral nuclear deal in 2018 and reimposed sanctions on Tehran.”Corona should not be turned into a weapon of our enemies for shutting down work and production in the country,” Rouhani said. “The Americans and our enemies during this time, around two years of which have passed, have wanted, with their sanctions and propaganda, to shut down production and economic activities in this country and for the people to suffer.” Topics : Nineteen people have died and 139 people have been infected by coronavirus in Iran, health ministry spokesman Kianush Jahanpur said on Wednesday in an announcement on state TV.Iran has had the highest number of deaths from coronavirus outside China, where the virus emerged in late 2019.Iranian officials announced the first deaths and infections from coronavirus in the Islamic Republic last week, and the spike in numbers in a short period of time has led Iranians to criticize authorities online and accuse them of a cover-up, a charge officials have denied.last_img read more

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RNC Day 1: Miami Cuban Immigrant Delivers Most Powerful Speech

first_imgFlorida businessman and Cuban migrant, Maximo Alvarez, stole the show at the Republican National Convention on Monday.Alvarez, the founder of Sunshine Gasoline Distributors, fled Cuba with his parents at the age of 13 as Fidel Castro and his communist regime took control of the island. Speaking in support of President Trump, an emotional Alvarez alleged that Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden is “mostly concerned about power” and would allow socialist policies to take hold in America.“I’ve seen movements like this before. I’ve seen ideas like this before. I am here to tell you – we cannot let them take over our country,” Alvarez said. “I heard the promises of Fidel Castro. And I can never forget all those who grew up around me, who looked like me, who suffered and starved and died because they believed those empty promises. They swallowed the communist poison pill.”Alvarez argued that Democrats have bad ideas such as free health care and calls to defund the police which he says are “false promises” that “sound familiar” based on his experiences in Cuba. The Trump administration has accused Biden and running mate Kamala Harris of embracing far-left policies in their platform.last_img read more

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Ellsworth Wins Eastern Maine Title

first_img Latest posts by admin (see all) Bio This is placeholder textThis is placeholder text admin State budget vs. job creation – January 22, 2015 House fire in Winter Harbor – October 27, 2014 Latest Posts The Ellsworth Eagles Boys Soccer team beat Presque Isle 2 to 1 to claim the Eastern Maine Class B title. Hancock County Court News Nov. 3 thorugh Dec. 11 – January 22, 2015last_img

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Wager promises to conquer betting’s social conundrum

first_img Wager: A fundamental desire to be responsible ahead of #RGWeek19 November 5, 2019 BetBull acquires Wager boosting its social muscle  June 24, 2020 Elliott Robinson: Exceeding Expectations in 2019 December 30, 2019 Leo Barnes – WagerLondon start-up ‘Wager’ will become the latest incumbent to tackle betting’s ‘social wagering conundrum’ after launching its propitiatory product on the Apple App Store.The enterprise founded by Oxford University graduates Leo Barnes and Elliot Robinson seeks to move wagering away from traditional bookmaker markets by tapping into betting’s ‘growing social trends’.Launching its app, Wager believes that it has developed the most complete digital solution that will overcome barriers that have afflicted previous ‘peer-to-peer’ betting incumbents, offering punters better fairer odds and tracking of wagers, supported with social dynamics to drive customer engagement.“Sports fans love betting against their mates but having to chase winnings and pay in cash is a painful, outdated experience,” said Co-Founder Leo Barnes. “Wager brings social betting onto an app and makes the experience slick and easy for punters. The app delivers live odds, instant pay-outs and performance tracking – it is the perfect way to put your money where your mouth is.”Wager has been backed by London venture capital fund Forward Partners, with the start-up having raised £500,000 in enterprise investment to date.Elliott Robinson – WagerIndustry observers will be monitoring Wager’s movements closely, tackling ‘peer-to-peer’ dynamics that have proved too complex or unprofitable for former challengers such as Flutter.com, a defunct former competitor to the Betfair Exchange, Syndicates product Colossus Bets and Smarkets, who would change its enterprise model to a traditional exchange format accommodate VIP punters.Elliott Robinson, co-founder at Wager, added: “We are delighted to have launched Wager and are very proud of the product we have created. As the new season gets going, we want to introduce the latest betting app that will create a buzz between friends up and down the country. On Wager, bets are always between mates, which is important to us, as healthy social competition is at the core of what we do.” Share StumbleUpon Share Submit Related Articleslast_img read more

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Top golf architect Tom Doak appointed by National Golf Centre

first_img Tom Doak, the world-renowned golf course architect, has been appointed to advise on the facilities at the National Golf Centre, the home of England Golf at Woodhall Spa in Lincolnshire. He will be making a significant contribution to the site development plan with particular emphasis on the Hotchkin course. The Hotchkin is ranked among the world’s top 100 courses and regarded as a test of heathland golf at its very best. General Manager, Richard Latham, is delighted with the appointment, and commented: “In our opinion Tom Doak is one of the most accomplished architects in the world today and we feel that renovating/refining a national treasure like the Hotchkin Course requires expert opinion. We are huge admirers of Tom’s work and are confident that his input will be invaluable.” Tom Doak, of Renaissance Golf Design, visited Woodhall Spa as a student and was taken with both the charm and severity of the Hotchkin course. He used the design of the 18th hole in his book, The Anatomy of a Golf Course. He said of his appointment: “The Hotchkin Course is one of the world’s great heathland courses, with a character all of its own.  That’s a rare thing in golf course architecture, and it will be at the forefront of our thinking as we look to suggest any refinements.  “The club has carefully catalogued the minor refurbishments of recent years and I’m delighted to assist in the creation of a formal development plan.  I am really looking forward to working with the management team in protecting the legacy and restoring reputation.” Tom Doak’s many notable achievements include both new builds and restoration work in a range of countries, on varying landscapes including heathland.  Recent projects have included the building of the Renaissance Club adjacent to Muirfield in Scotland, the dramatic Cape Kidnappers course in New Zealand and Pacific Dunes in Oregon in the US, all of them rated highly in the world ranking lists.  Tom and his associates are also the architectural consultants for courses across the world and from the Mid Ocean Club in Bermuda to Royal Melbourne in Australia. 23 Jan 2016 Top golf architect Tom Doak appointed by National Golf Centre last_img read more

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