ESF cross-country captures 4th consecutive USCAA championship

first_img Published on November 12, 2014 at 12:02 am As the season’s first snow fell through the air above Drumlins Country Club, a familiar sight was unfolding on the field below. Runners representing more than 60 schools ran the rain-soaked course, hoping to top the champions on their home turf.But despite their best efforts, the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry Mighty Oaks once again came out victorious.The Mighty Oaks won their fourth consecutive United States Collegiate Athletic Association men’s cross-country championships Friday, cementing their place as a powerhouse in collegiate running.Led by first-year graduate student Timmy Callahan, who was the race’s overall winner in his final year of athletic eligibility, the Oaks were able to defend their title once more. For Callahan, who also won the 2013 race, there was no better way to end his running career.“It meant so much to perform well on our home course in front of students, staff, friends and family,” Callahan said. “The win means more than just to me or the team, but to all the people that have supported us in our running community. This is a victory for ESF and Syracuse.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textA large part of that victory came from the guidance of head coach John View, who in his four years leading the Oaks has transformed the team from a little-known, three-year-old program to a perennial national champion.View refuses to take total credit for the team’s success, instead attributing that to the efforts made by his student-athletes and assistant coaches to build the team into a contender each year.“I just hope that people recognize consistency across the board,” View said. “I want to be a consistent coach. I like to think that four championships is the result of hard work by the athletes, and hard work by the coaches to mentor them, work with them and listen to them.”Hard work has been the standard for View’s runners, who are not recruited by the school and do not receive athletic scholarships. Inclusion is another pillar of the Oaks’ success, as View holds open tryouts and does not make cuts to the team.The athletic policies of View and ESF are increasingly rare in collegiate sports, where it often seems that talented students are acquired by most schools in an athletic arms race to create the most talented team possible.That the Oaks have been so successful despite these policies might be a surprise to outsiders, but to those running for ESF it makes perfect sense.“He has led us through a great training regimen,” senior runner Jacob Wolfgong said. “(He) also encouraged us to push ourselves in our academics and other pursuits, and that makes running for him a lot of fun.”It remains to be seen how the Oaks will fare after the loss of their best runner in Callahan, but View is confident his players will step up and continue their success. It helps that his star runner will continue to help his teammates, even if he can no longer run with them. Callahan will be joining the coaching staff as an assistant next season.“As I have told the underclassmen, Timmy’s time has passed us now,” View said. “It’s time for the underclassmen who will be back here next year and for the new students coming in to look inside themselves and say ‘Do I want to be someone like Timmy Callahan?’” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Read More →

Engineering report confirms in order to save 107 W. Lincoln building it would cost $529,000

first_img Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments (24) Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings Sort by: Date Rating Last Activity Loading comments… You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. +7 Vote up Vote down New comer · 206 weeks ago Tear it down and sell the lot. I’m sure someone will buy the lot and build a newer, greener building. I mean people are knocking down the door to move to Wellington. Report Reply 3 replies · active 206 weeks ago +6 Vote up Vote down Larry · 206 weeks ago It would be ashamed to see one of the older buildings in Wellington destroyed. History would be taken away from the community. But I guess time goes on. Report Reply 0 replies · active 206 weeks ago +5 Vote up Vote down mom2mykids · 206 weeks ago This is just sad…sad that we will loose such a grand building but who can afford almost $600,000 for repairs? I hope their insurance will cover their lose. Report Reply 0 replies · active 206 weeks ago +1 Vote up Vote down Larry · 206 weeks ago I wonder if there is any chance that the building would qualify as a historical marker and maybe get some money to save it. Just a thought Report Reply 2 replies · active 206 weeks ago -1 Vote up Vote down Come On · 206 weeks ago It is sad that we could lose this building since the structure is so loose. I hope their insurance can cover their loss and they don’t lose it. Report Reply 0 replies · active 206 weeks ago +5 Vote up Vote down Forspenceralvie · 206 weeks ago The hell with the building.There is a good man that lost his business that was doing quite well until this happened.Save the building?Spencer is the best barber in town.By far.This destroyed everything he made of it.Absolutely appalling Report Reply 2 replies · active 206 weeks ago +5 Vote up Vote down Eric Lacey · 206 weeks ago If you can get it tore down for 50k-100k you better jump on it,I cant see it getting done for that cheap,heck the backfill alone will cost a pretty penny because I’m sure it has a large basement.I think the earlier numbers that was put out a few weeks ago was way off. Report Reply 0 replies · active 206 weeks ago +2 Vote up Vote down Johnny Cash · 206 weeks ago If possible I would get a second bid on repairs. if it has a basement its going to cost over 100k to demolish. There was a building in Ark City that was demolished lowest bid was 78k and it was smaller was only 2 floors and a basement. Report Reply 0 replies · active 206 weeks ago 0 Vote up Vote down O. Well · 206 weeks ago Too costly to repair. Destruction costs are probably too high as well. Most economical plan is to simply rope off the area and wait for a good earthquake. Problem solved! Report Reply 1 reply · active 206 weeks ago +4 Vote up Vote down Jim · 206 weeks ago I wonder how long it took this building to get like this, and how many times the owners had the ability to maintenance this building properly? It is made of brick, and mortar however it still need maintained. Does anyone know how many owners this has had if it was properly inspected between sales, and if someone knew about these problems prior to renting it out to the last business owners that occupied the space. If they knowingly rented a property that would be deemed uninhabitable I would at least seek some restitution if I was one of the individuals that had to close due to the gross negligence of the property owner. Report Reply 0 replies · active 206 weeks ago 12Next » Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments 8000 square foot building on Lincoln and Washington has been roped off since July.by Tracy McCue, Sumner Newscow — The City of Wellington’s consulting firm Professional Engineering Consultants of Wichita just issued a report that does not bode well for the survival of the building at 107 W. Lincoln.The city office has just received a report this Thursday from PEC stating that in order for the building to be safely stabilized and secured, it would cost either the owner or the city an estimated $529,000.“I’m not sure that is something we could afford,” said Shane Shields, Wellington City Manager.The demolition of the building will undoubtedly cost less, but Shields would not offer a guesstimate how much such a procedure would cost. Wellington City Inspector Richard Jack said in a previous council meeting that demolition would cost between $50,000 and $100,000.The imperiled building on the northwest corner of Lincoln and Washington has been shut down since July 14. The street at Lincoln between Washington and Jefferson has also been closed down in fear of the building falling. The sidewalks have been also roped off from pedestrians.Shields said he will be taking the report to the Wellington City Council which is scheduled to meet on Sept. 6 for its regular meeting.Jack said last week he and a PEC structural engineer had spent two hours in the building.Earlier in a memo sent to the Wellington City Council, dated Aug. 12, 2016, Jack stated:“From my last report a few things have occurred, the “swimming pool” on the roof is no longer there; unfortunately it is now dispersed throughout the building. Sometime last Friday, a hole developed and emptied water into the entire front half of the building. The secondary roof on the third floor has experienced additional collapse. On the second and first floors, the water caused the plaster ceiling to fail and the drop ceilings on the first floor to come down.”Jack went on to say part of the roofing diaphragm system that holds the roof decking and roofing material in place had collapsed further, which has allowed rain over the past month to infiltrate into the building.“It seems the roof is being held up due to a hard lid that was installed during the 1999-2000 owner remodel.” he wrote in the memo. “As of this writing, the water is pouring in; however the ‘roof’ is still in place. I cannot determine how much longer this is going be the case. The water no longer pooled on the roof has likely reduced the stress on the sides of the building.”Janet Spevak, who is listed as the owner of the building, has been unavailable for comment. Jack said the Spevaks are devastated.“This was an absolute surprise to them,” he said. “They put all their time and money – everything they had – into making this their home and then this happened.”The owners self reported the problem in July and told Red Beard Barbershop it could no longer operate. The owner, Spencer Furman, decided to not relocate and open the business. Since then, Jack said the Spevaks have periodically moved their belongings from the premises.Jack has been warning the council that the building could crumble within a month unless there was some kind of temporary fix.Wellington downtown developer Tom McAlister, who once owned the building, but sold it more than 25 years ago said he thought it would take at least $1.52 million to renovate.“I’m not going to buy it,” he said. “I have my hands full with a lot of other projects.”That includes the former Apple Market building on Harvey and Jefferson which he is renovating for warehouse storage.Jack had said in an earlier Sumner Newscow article that to adequately stabilize the building it would involve putting steel beams into the ground that will have plates attached. The plates would then hold the walls in place for awhile.As far as the street is concerned, it will remain closed until the stabilization or the demolition of the building is completed for safety reasons, Jack said.This has raised the ire of at least one neighboring businessman. Jerry Fike, manager of the Wellington Regent Theater, stated in a Facebook post, it is costing him business.The building is considered to be more than 100 years old, and was completed around 1910. McAlister said the first floor may have been older than that and was used as a shoe business, perhaps clear back in the 1870s.“Those were the days when the shoe business was a big business in downtowns,” McAlister said. “You should see the floor in there.”McAlister said the second and third floors were built later. The Wellington Masons eventually used the third floor as a gathering place for secret meetings and rituals. There is no direct access to the third floor except a ladder.The troubling thing about this is the building itself was nice inside having incurred numerous renovations over the past 25 years by the Spevaks and a California couple before them. It was known as the Lincoln Place.Follow us on Facebook.Follow us on Twitter.last_img read more

Read More →