Allied Bakeries extends 400g bread line

first_imgAllied Bakeries has extended its range of 400g loaves to include Kingsmill Tasty Wholemeal, Kingsmill 50/50 and Kingsmill Soft White and Burgen Soya and Linseed.The firm said the move has been designed suit the varying lifestyles of its consumers. “Burgen, in particular, is a fond choice among over-65 consumers, due to its positive health benefits. With the children gone, these households have fewer mouths to feed, so often find that larger loaves can go wasted,” said Allied. It added that larger families can also enjoy the benefits of smaller loaves as everyone’s tastes can be catered for.Guy Shepherd, category director, Allied Bakeries said: “Bread remains a UK staple with 98% household penetration (Kantar GB Household penetration 52 w/e 25 December 2011) – but people’s consumption habits are changing. “The expanded 400g loaf range will ensure that even more customers are catered for, from big families to smaller households.”last_img read more

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Fourteen Notre Dame dorms lack wheelchair accessibility

first_img“If a student would have a class in that building, we would move it to a different location,” he said. Howland said when he came to the University in the 1990s, the Mod Quad residence halls — Pasquerilla East, Pasquerilla West, Knott and Siegfried Hall — were the most physically accessible dorms. “Right when I started, they were building Keough and McGlinn and Welsh Family. Those were kind of the ideal, at that point, to place students in,” he said. “And Ryan Hall — the Ryan family was very interested in accessibility, so they ensured that a lot of things were put in place for Ryan that were fully accessible.” University architect Doug Marsh said the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), which was passed in 1990 and took effect in 1992, has facility and “built-environment” requirements. The state of Indiana also has separate accessible design criteria, and though the two codes are usually consistent, there are small differences. “Any building after 1992 is considered new construction and needs to be barrier-free,” he said. Jessica Ping is a freshman at Notre Dame who has CHILD syndrome, a limb and skin deficiency, and has only partial limbs on her left side. “In order to get around for long distances, I have to use a chair or a prosthetic, which I don’t use very often because of the skin thing. Most of the time, I just use the chair. I can hop short distances,” she said.  Ping lives in a quad in McGlinn Hall, but has her own room that has buttons allowing her to leave and enter more easily, as well as a shower with similar modifications. She will be living in the new women’s residence hall that will open in the fall of 2016. “Other than that, I’m not going to lie — McGlinn is supposedly one of the most accessible dorms, but I’ve had an awful time with it. It’s been really bad. The snow situation was just awful this year, with the parking lot out in front and nobody was willing to do anything about it. So that’s one thing I’m not happy with,” she said. Ping said the first snowfall of the year was on a Saturday night. “I was hungry, the dining hall was about to close, but my rector said I wouldn’t be able to get out. She was right, I got stuck, had to be pushed back in,” she said. “Long story short, we ended up calling NDSP to see if they could give me a ride in one of the cop cars to the dining hall, and they just threw a fit about it. They were so rude to myself, my roommates and my rector. They were unbelievably terrible to deal with and I didn’t try ever again with them. “But I did keep in contact with the disability services on campus and was like, ‘Hey, I’m having issues with the snow, can you fix it?’ And they always tried to word it in a way like they were really sorry, but they weren’t going to fix it,” she said.Marsh said the University has also worked to identify barriers in buildings that were constructed before 1992 and create a program to remove those barriers. Notre Dame’s historic campus, with more than 100 buildings constructed before 1992, presents unique challenges. For example, Alumni Hall, a men’s residence hall constructed in 1931, is sunk in the ground and has a “mid-level” entry. “They do each have those ramped entrances so people can get on the main level, but again, there’s the chapel, now has three steps down to step into.” he said. “You remove as many barriers as physically possible, but some just aren’t achievable.” Ping said the lack of working elevators in other residence halls, like Lyons, has kept her from being able to visit friends in their own dorms.“I can hop up the stairs, but I don’t feel comfortable, especially at night, leaving my chair outside for any passerby to mess around with,” she said. Megan Crowley, a freshman in Ryan Hall with Pompe disease, which progressively weakens muscles, said she specifically looked at wheelchair accessibility when she was visiting college campuses as a prospective student. Editor’s note: Crowley spoke to The Observer with the assistance of her nurse, Debbie Larsen, who is quoted below.“Some of the colleges were not accessible, so those got crossed off the list. Notre Dame was one of the ones that was really accommodating to her,” Larsen said.  Crowley said she has a parking space for her wheelchair-accessible van and special access to closer spaces for some buildings. She also has her own room in Ryan Hall. “Because she needs her own shower, she has a nurse twenty-four hours a day with her, and she needed the space as well for all the equipment and to accommodate her needs,” Larsen said. “The room is just amazing because it has a shower, it has access to water, she has a remote that opens the dorm doors. It opens the main doors for her and it also opens her own dorm room so she can get in and out.” Crowley said she is bothered by the fact that she might not be able to attend an event on campus because not all the buildings are wheelchair-accessible. “… But at this point in her life, she’s accepted that there are going to be places that she can’t access and, if they can fix it, that’s great,” Larsen said. “But she does understand that some of these buildings are very old and they can’t be fixed. It’s not realistic for her to expect that everything in her life is going to be easy, and that everyone’s going to be able to accommodate her needs, and she understands that and is fine with that.” Marsh said the University considers the requirements set forth by ADA and state codes to be minimums, and tries to exceed those minimums “in several key areas,” including ramp design. While ramps are allowed to have “about an 8.3 percent” slope, ramps on the University’s new construction aim to have a maximum slope of five percent. “It’s a big difference,” he said.”What these codes, and the ADA architectural provisions allow, is you to remove the railing because it’s such a subtle slope you don’t necessarily need it. From an aesthetic standpoint it doesn’t bring all this attention to the ramp, it’s just a subtle incline — you don’t need so many landings along the way. And, it’s more importantly, easier for people negotiate, depending on their disability.” Transitions in floor material, such as going from carpet to tile, or vinyl to tile or a wood floor, is another issue the University tries to be cognizant of in new construction, Marsh said.  “Again, speaking with people who’ve endured these challenges, those transitions, even allowed, can be jarring or, depending on their condition, quite painful,” he said. “Ryan Hall was the first of its kind to have a no vertical floor transitions.“We established different floor levels in the subfloor when we built the building, anticipating that the carpet is going to be this thick, but the tile is going to be this thick — we make the adjustment, so that when you roll across, or even if you’re walking but maybe have a malady that makes you drag your foot, it’s not a trip hazard to you. That’s not easy to do, but that’s our goal, to have a zero-transition change between flooring materials.” The Department of Justice also issued updated requirements for accessible design in 2010, but these changes were “fairly subtle,” Marsh said. “They didn’t change universal kinds of things, more dimensional, like the bathroom clearances changed. … It’s a matter of a few inches, but it’s important when you try to negotiate in a tight space,” he said. “Again it’s an area that we’re trying to make sure that restrooms and other small activity spaces, access to your offices are appropriate beyond the minimum, so if that change happens again, in the future, you don’t have that challenge.” News writer Megan Valley contributed to this story. Tags: accessibility, disability, Disability series 2016, Office of Disability Services, Sara Bea Center for Students with Disabilities Editor’s note: This is the fourth day in a series on disability at Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s. Today’s stories focus on student experiences with physical accessibility at the College and University.Lindsey Meyers | The Observer Scott Howland, coordinator in the office of Disability Services, said all current academic buildings are accessible for students with physical disabilities, aside from Riley Hall, which is home to the art, art history and design department.last_img read more

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Badgers making most of spring schedule

first_imgWhen most people think of spring sports, they think baseball, softball, maybe track and field or even crew, but lurking in the shadows is a team that primary plays in fall — the women’s soccer team.The short spring season is an important part of building a program. Whether it is conditioning, skill improvement or just staying familiar with teammates, spring provides a launching point for the fall season.“[Spring] is really time to develop your new team, who you are,” head coach Dean Duerst said.Spring is also a time for the team to grow without the pressure of games every weekend.“[The team] has fun, they enjoy each other, and that is kind of what spring is about,” Duerst said. “You don’t have that pressure for two games on a weekend all the time, but this group is performing well when they do get that pressure laid on top of them. That is sort of what spring does for you. It helps develop a new identity for a team.”Spring provides players with a chance to work in different positions and see where and with whom they are able to make the biggest impact.“[Spring] allowed us to look at some different player personnel,” Duerst said. “Putting some different people in some different roles, different positions, see how well they do. You know, challenge some different people against each other.”The short season gives the players and coaches a chance to see where the players are conditioning-wise and work to get better.“We have done sort of like a fitness testing,” Duerst said. “From where we started in February to where we are now, they all improved. Some it is very difficult for them to improve because they are so fit, but even those showed some improvement.”Finally, spring is the time when leaders emerge.“In the spring I work with a leadership group — that is the six seniors,” Duerst said. “They now have to feel this new kind of responsibility. The team is going to move in a direction of its strongest force — its leadership.”“Those juniors in school are like ‘wow, this is it, this is the last year’,” Duerst said.Four of those seniors-to-be have stepped up and into leadership roles as captains for the fall season. Jessica Ring returns as one captain and is joined by Amy Vermeulen, Katy Lindenmuth and Marisa Brown.“You look at those four and you can rely on them,” Duerst said. “They bring this consistency, this level of focus and concentration. Ultimately they are the people that will make us extremely competitive. I have a lot of high expectations for those four.”Coach Duerst expects them to be the benchmark for the rest of the team to strive for.“They kind of set a standard for the rest of the group,” Duerst said. “The rest of the group has some real good talent and intensity in their play, too, but it is kind of exciting to have four [leaders] like that.”Even beyond the captains, the team has a lot of players with experience. It is this experience that gives Duerst a lot of confidence heading into next season.“I feel like the team is very dynamic,” he said. “Which means they have to win. I think with this team because of their experience, because of the depth it is making the top players even better. Position per position, there are some very good challenges going on out there.”However, in addition to the many seasoned players on the team, a great deal of future talent is laying in wait. Nine freshmen will be added to the squad in the fall, adding even more depth and competition to an already deep team.“It will be an interesting mix of several new players that are obviously talented youth players that are coming into sort of a senior developed kind of team,” Duerst said. “I think the young players coming in will give a great challenge and some of them will take a little longer to adjust.”But in the end both the team and Duerst are ready for the spring season to end so they can get back into the competition of the fall.“[Spring] gets too long without enough competition,” he said. “But it will be exciting for the team in the fall.”last_img read more

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Dodgers’ front office undergoes large overhaul in short order

first_imgFriedman said Zaidi will focus on the major-league roster and player acquisitions. Byrnes will focus on scouting and player development.“Both guys will touch everything,” Friedman said.Zaidi, 37, had been the Oakland A’s assistant general manager since February. While he’ll receive a promotion in title (and presumably pay grade), Zaidi admitted his duties will largely remain the same.“There’s going to be a good amount of continuity for me,” he said. “There’s a greater degree of managing the operation rather than being somebody that was a sounding board and an advisor to the GM. That aspect is different.“For me, this opportunity wasn’t about coming here to be a GM. It was about coming here to be part of the vision Stan and the rest of the group has for the organization. That’s what really excited me.” Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Dodgers president Stan Kasten has been a baseball executive for 25 seasons. He oversaw a massive offseason turnover in 2009, when he was the Washington Nationals’ president. That year he hired eight men into his front office, plus a new manager.Other than that year, Kasten said, this offseason has brought more change to any front office than he can remember. There are more new suits and the same number of chairs. The office space at Dodger Stadium is running low.It makes sense, then, that many of the questions directed at Farhan Zaidi on Friday focused on what his responsibilities will be as the Dodgers’ new general manager. He will be flanked by a senior vice president of baseball operations in Josh Byrnes — himself a former GM. Andrew Friedman is the president of the department in title.“It’s something we talked about a lot during the process,” Zaidi said. “We have respect for each other. We all bring different strengths to the table. Andrew’s the point man on that. This is a big operation. He’s going to need a lot of help.”center_img Beyond the sheer volume of turnover, the new front office faces the question of balance. Zaidi has a Ph.D. in economics and Friedman spent two years as an analyst with the investment firm Bear Stearns. It’s quite a contrast from the previous regime. Ned Colletti rose the front-office ranks as a scout; his top advisors were also scouts. Have the Dodgers made a full 180-degree swing toward analytics?“We feel really strongly that the combination of people we’ve brought in … will be a very well-rounded and diverse group,” Friedman said. “To pigeonhole someone like Farhan is not doing him justice.”To help achieve a balanced combination of perpsectives, Kasten said, “we brought in the ‘wise old owls’ — the Gerry Hunsickers and the Pat Corraleses.” Kasten hired both veteran evaluators prior to the 2013 season.There are still more additions. The Dodgers announced San Diego Padres scouting director Billy Gasparino as their director of amateur scouting, succeeding Logan White. Former Dodgers outfielder Gabe Kapler will become the team’s director of player development.At least the Dodgers’ coaching staff will remain the same. Friedman confirmed that Tim Wallach, Mark McGwire, John Valentin, Rick Honeycutt, Lorenzo Bundy, Davey Lopes, Chuck Crim and Ken Howell will be back in 2015.Zaidi said he already has spoken to Dodgers manager Don Mattingly on the phone.“I totally outed myself telling him how much I idolized him growing up,” Zaidi said. “I don’t know if he can ever see me in a position of authority. I could just hear him thinking ‘God, I’ve heard this so many times.’”last_img read more

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Parker puts on a show at Pattaya Country Club

first_imgPSC golf from The Bunker BarMonday, August 29, Khao Kheow – StablefordOnly one good round worth mentioning today which was played by Tony Robbins who won with a very respectable 35 Stableford points.  Second and third places went to Colin Greig and Raleigh Gosney respectively, Raleigh beating Geoff Hart on a count back. 1st Tony Robbins (12) 35pts2nd Colin Greig (10) 28pts3rd Raleigh Gosney (18) 25ptsNear Pins:  Raleigh Gosney, Colin Greig, Geoff Hart.Wednesday, August 31, Green Valley – StablefordA reasonable turnout for Green Valley as usual saw Tony Robbins make it two wins out of two for the week, just nicking it by one point ahead of Mukesh who in turn was one point ahead of Colin Greig who won on a count back for a change!1st Tony Robbins (10) 38pts2nd Mukesh (10) 37pts3rd Colin Greig (10) 36ptsNear Pins:  Colin Stokes, Peter Habgood, Reg Smart, Geoff Cox.Friday, Sept. 2, Pattaya C.C. – StablefordSimon Parker playing off handicap 3 had a superb round of golf, winning with 41 points, three points ahead of his pal Eddie Martin and Ken Young got in the frame for one of the first times in his illustrious career with the Bunker Boys!1st Simon Parker (3) 41pts2nd Eddie Martin (18) 38pts3rd Ken Young (28) 37ptsNear Pins:  Eddie Martin, William Macey, Tony Robbins, Colin Greig.last_img read more

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Laong fires blistering back nine at Pattaya Country Club

first_imgPSC golf from The Outback Golf BarMonday, November 7, Khao Kheow – Stableford There wasn’t a report filed by anyone about the course today but what seemed over the weekend as though it was going to be a very low turnout changed into a full house, although only 21 played on the tournament as the Irish guys, who were due to joins us, arrived late and played in their own competition. So it was A & B from the yellows and it does look as though the Outbackers are gradually learning how to play this course as Suzi topped the day, after a lean spell of some weeks, with an excellent 41 points, to take Div A by six from the consistent Graham Johnson on 35. A happy Suzi Lawton after her fantastic 41 points at Khao Kheow.Andy Makara also turned on a bit of form to win Div B with 38 points, losing one shot to handicap in the process and he was two clear of two guys on 36, Chris Thompson and Steve Plant.In the race to the end of the month in the Big Mango Properties sponsored best 6 cards tournament, Dennis Pelly (99pts) opened up a clear lead of 13 points over Owen Walkley (86pts), they being the only two players to have entered all three counting tournaments so far; with Greg Hill back in third on 69.Finally, there was an incident involving the marking of a scorecard.  All players are reminded that it is the players responsibility see ensure that his or her card has been marked correctly at the end of the round before it is handed in to the tournament organisers.  Don’t give your marker a hard time if the score is wrong in your opinion but you failed to sign or check your card just because you’re in a hurry to leave the course!There was only one ‘2’ from Dennis Pelly on hole 17.Div A (0-15)1st Suzi Lawton (15/Hi16.8) 41pts2nd Graham Johnson (8/Hi7.3) 35pts3rd Paul Pedelty (16/Hi14.5) 34pts4th Dennis Pelly (12/Hi10.8) 34ptsDiv B (16+)1st Andy Makara (30/Hi27.5) 38pts2nd Chris Thompson (26/Hi23.6) 36pts3rd Steve Plant (18/Hi13.3) 36pts4th Paul Rogers (22/Hi20.5) 32ptsTuesday, November 8, Pattaya C.C. – StablefordIt was another good turnout here at Pattaya Country Club with 26 Outbackers playing in two divisions.Some of the visiting 17 Irish lads relax at the Outback Golf Bar.The course was in good condition and as usual our organiser for the day, Chad, got us all away in fine fashion, even though he didn’t quite believe it himself when it was down to the last two groups and he had 8 players left!  If you’d seen him the day before trying to get the groups sorted, with Capt’ Bob having about three Kens playing and Irish Sean, and then a couple more no shows in the morning, it really was quite remarkable that it all worked out OK.  Well done mate!It was nice to see Frank O’Neill in the bar on Tuesday morning, there to support his good lady, Laong who looks after him so well.  He must have inspired her that morning as she returned one of her best scores ever (42pts), which contained one the most remarkable back nines seen on any scorecard.  Going out in a modest 16 points, Laong opened up the back nine with three 4 pointers in a row, birdieing the 10th and the 12th and not content with that she collected another 4 points on hole 15, to romp home with a total on the back nine of 26!Poor John White must have wondered what hit him, as he scored a great 41 points, in stark contrast to last week’s effort, but it was only enough to earn him second place, however it did move him up the DeVere Monthly Eclectic leader-board.  Chad also scored well today to take third with 37.General Jack (35pts), followed last week’s win with another one this week, staying under the handicap radar both times as he beat Billy Fitzgerald who was going great guns on the front nine (22pts) only to struggle on the back with only 13.  Perhaps the departure of John Cogan, who had to go home to take care of one of his kids after 8 holes having already scored 18 points at that point, disrupted Billy’s obvious comfort zone.There were only two ‘2’s from Geoff Williams on hole 7 and Laong on hole 12.Div A (0-17)1st Jack Moseley (14/Hi14.9) 35pts2nd Billy Fitzgerald (12/Hi13) 35pts3rd Dennis Persson (14/Hi15.7) 32pts4th Geoff Doody (17/Hi17.9) 31ptsDiv B (18+)1st Laong Gatepratum (27/Hi25.6) 42pts2nd John White (27/Hi27.2) 41pts3rd Barry Chadbourn (18/Hi19) 37pts4th Nigel Cannon (21/Hi21.6) 33ptsWednesday, November 9, Burapha – StablefordWith 48 players it takes a little bit of time to get everyone away, but we got there in the end.  It was a great day for golf just a nice breeze and not too hot and there was a new “Boo Hoo” cup challenge today between John and Suzi Lawton against Bob Philp and Neil Lavery, which was won on the 18th by a shot from Suzi:- 100 yards to go and she hits it to 6 inches.The Capt was playing under a handicap today with his first two shots off the 1st tee going out of bounds – a great start to the day.John Lawton managed to get Neil a bit under the weather and by the time we turned it was anybody’s “Boo Hoo” cup, but the beer took over from about hole number 13 and that was the end of us.As for the rest of the scores, they were not too bad but nobody got the better of the course as the best score in was 38 points from one of the Irish lads visiting us for the second year; hope you enjoyed your day fellas.John Cunningham topped Div A with 35 points, just pipping one of the Irish boys, James O’Mahony, on count back with Jim Brackett and Owen Walkley following them in just one shot back, both with 34.Gerry Mernagh (Irish) won Div B with 38 ahead of Les Easton (37) with Pete Stonebridge a distant third on 31.Our regular players dominated Div C with the win going to Greg Hill (36) and Bob Lindborg (33) and Barry McIntosh also with 33, taking the minor places.  We also had a D division today and that was won by another of the Irish, Mr J Braithwaite, with 37.The course continues to be in magnificent condition with the greens fast and true and with run now on the fairways.Note: The “Boo Hoo” is a little fun matchplay challenge started last year and this year it will run until just after Christmas and will serve as a charity fundraiser.  So if you fancy throwing down the gauntlet for a match against your mates you’re welcome to have a go, with the losers contributing to the fund of course.There were only three ‘2’s from Owen Walkely on hole C5, Dennis Pelly (hole C8) and Tom Fitzpatrick (hole D8).Div A (0-11)1st John Cunningham (7/Hi6.8) 35pts2nd James O’Mahony (6) 35pts3rd Jim Brackett (5/Hi5.1) 34pts4th Owen Walkley (9/Hi9.3) 34ptsDiv B (12-17)1st Gerry Mernagh (17/Hi16.5) 38pts2nd Les Easton (15/Hi14.3) 37pts3rd Pete Stonebridge (15/Hi15) 31pts4th Gary Lunn (12) 29ptsDiv C (18-22)1st Greg Hill (21/Hi19.9) 36pts2nd Bob Lindborg (19/Hi18.8) 33pts3rd Barry McIntosh (18/Hi17.5) 33pts4th Bill Bennett (19/Hi18) 31ptsDiv D (23+)1st J Braithwaite (23/Hi22) 37pts2nd Steve Giles (25/Hi24.1) 34pts3rd Chris Thompson (25/Hi23.7) 33pts4th Pat Connolly (23/Hi22) 33ptsFriday, November 11, Green Valley – StablefordOur Irish friends from Wednesday, never made it, which was probably just as well as we would have been overbooked by a few on an already busy course, leaving us with a good sized field of 30, plus a couple or so.Suzi ran the comp as Capt’ Bob had jobs to do and the General was up country enjoying the delights of Loy Kratong (Thurs 10th Nov) in Surin for a change instead of at the packed beaches in Pattaya & Jomtien.Jan Eriksen led the way in Div A, with the day’s top score of 38, from Steve Plant and Murray Hart both on 37.  Div B went to a surprise winner, John Lawton (35pts) who’s back to work in Nigeria this weekend, with Andy Makara and Paul Rogers filling the second and third spots with 34 apiece.There were two ‘2’s on hole 12, one from Dennis Pelly and the other from Chris Thompson.Div A (0-16)1st Jan Eriksen (14/Hi14.1) 38pts2nd Steve Plant (13/Hi13.3) 37pts3rd Murray Hart (13/Hi13.2) 37pts4th Dennis Pelly (10/Hi10.9) 36ptsDiv B (17+)1st John Lawton (20/Hi19.4) 35pts2nd Andy Makara (27/Hi26.5) 34pts3rd Paul Rogers (21/Hi20.5) 34pts4th Roger Pickering (26/Hi25.1) 32ptsNote:  The Outback Golf Bar is situated about 6km from Sukhumvit Road along Soi Siam Country.  All are welcome to come and join us for a beer and a hit. Just call in and put your name down on the list or give Bob a call on 087 941 2474.last_img read more

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Sports Bag: State of golf courses

first_imgUK Sports Editor;P.S.C. members have recently written up an article about the very poor state of the Emerald Golf Course and its very high fees. They moan and say they will “place balls” on the course until it improves. But if it is that bad, why continue to support the club? Articles in newspapers will mean nothing to the course’s Thai owners, but action by loss of business will get their attention. Why not get other members of P.S.C. to help by supporting a blockade against playing at all clubs of very poor quality and high fees?Thai golf course fees have gone up around 50% on average since 2010 but the courses have not improved by that much, and in some cases have got worse. Why not set up an info page on P.S.C.’s web site with updates on courses for all to see so they will be in the know and can make a decision as to where they play next? This might help improve things.Carl Whilelast_img read more

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Stars Adult Day Program Brightens Day for Seniors with Dementia, Gives…

first_imgFacebook39Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Senior Services for South SoundLaughter often breaks out from the Stars Room at the Lacey Senior Center.  The joyful sound of people having a good time. What fun activities are at the source of this joy? Here is a sampling from the current calendar of activities: The Science of Rainbows, Potato Chip Day, Weird Science, Frogs-Natures Health Monitors, Cherry Blossom Festival, Button Art, BINGO, Daffodil Art, Shuffleboard, Basketball, Music with Joe and Sing-a-long. The most important source of joy is just belonging to a group and enjoying being together.Stars participants enjoy cognitively and physically stimulating games such as Parachute Ball. Photo courtesy: Senior Services for South SoundThe program content focuses on conversation, games that are both cognitively and physically stimulating, pet therapy, art and music. Participants are people living with dementia or some other condition requiring supervised care. The program combats social isolation that might otherwise occur when mobility or normal societal connections become difficult or disappear.Most of our Stars participants live with their families or some other caregiver in their own homes or the homes of family members. The Stars Program provides a place where the care-receiver can get an engaging program while family caregivers get a break from 24 hours-a-day, seven-days-a-week care. This break gives them the opportunity to take care of themselves, exercise, go shopping, run errands, sleep, socialize or even earn a living with peace of mind, knowing that their loved one is receiving good care.Stars participants enjoying lunch on the deck overlooking Longs Pond on a sunny day. Photo courtesy: Senior Services for South SoundSeveral care providers use the time that their loved-one is at Stars to spend un-interrupted time at work and conduct business activities. One current participant attends five days a week so that their daughter can help run the family business. Another participant’s daughter works from home two days a week but has Stars program for her father the other three days a week when she has to be in the office.The Stars program operates five days a week in Lacey at the Lacey Senior Center, between the hours of 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. The program also operates in Shelton on Mondays and Wednesdays, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. each week.Potential participants can arrange a visit day to see the program in action and begin the enrollment process. The program cost $13.50 per hour, however, scholarships are available at lower or no cost to the participant. Call Stars Director, Paul Taylor for more information at 360-407-3967 ext. 107.People enjoying Memory Cafe. Photo courtesy: Senior Services for South SoundThe Stars program is working on reaching out to people who have just gotten a diagnosis of dementia and their families as they try to adjust to the challenges this diagnosis will bring to their lives. The program is active in the dementia support group that meets on the 4th Friday of the month at St. Mark’s Lutheran Church, 2109 College St.  SE in Lacey, WA.Dementia Talks is an educational program offered at the Lacey Senior Center on the second Thursday of each month to help people learn more about dementia. There is a specific topic for each month and time for questions and discussion.Joe Lawn provides lively Memory Cafe entertainment. Photo courtesy: Senior Services for South SoundMemory Café is an opportunity for people living with dementia and their families to enjoy a social outing with people who understand what they are experiencing.  Memory Café is the first Thursday of each month from 2:30 – 4:30 p.m. at The Rivers Edge Restaurant, 4611 Tumwater Valley Drive SE in Tumwater. Memory Café in Mason County meets on the third Thursday of the month at 1:00 PM at the Restaurant in Alpine Way Senior living center in Shelton.last_img read more

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