U.S. Attorney: Manco & Manco Owners ‘Cordial’ in Making Incriminating Statements

first_imgChuck Bangle talks to prospective employees at an Ocean City High School job fair in February 2015. Bangle awaits trial on tax evasion charges related to his business, Manco & Manco pizza.In a pretrial response filed Friday, U.S. Attorney Paul J. Fishman argued that the owners of Manco & Manco Pizza in Ocean City were “cordial” as they welcomed Internal Revenue Service agents into their home during a surprise 2012 interrogation.Charles and Mary Bangle, owners of three Ocean City Boardwalk pizza shops and one in Somers Point that earn a combined $4.5 million annually, are awaiting trial on a 30-count indictment alleging they failed to report $981,000 in income to the IRS between 2007 and 2011 and dodged paying $336,273 in federal taxes.Attorneys for the Bangles are asking a federal judge to exclude statements made by the defendants because they were “coerced” and never informed of their Miranda rights during the May 20, 2012 interview in their Somers Point home. They filed an April 17 motion asking Judge Robert B. Kugler to dismiss a large part of the indictment against them.But the U.S. attorney argued in his May 8 response that the Bangles invited two special agents into their living room after the agents arrived unannounced at their doorstep at 8 a.m. on that May 2012 morning. Charles Bangle offered them coffee and joked that his heritage required him to be hospitable, according to the memorandum of opposition filed by Fishman.When confronted with documents that contradicted statements he made earlier, Charles Bangle “apologized for lying to the agents,” saying he was relieved about getting caught and that he would tell the agents “everything,” according to memo. He stopped only when Mary Bangle began screaming “and commanded that Charles Bangle stop talking” and suggested they speak to a lawyer, the document states.The U.S. attorney says the agents left at that point, but not before Charles Bangle offered cell phone numbers for him and his wife.“The Bangles allege that their statements were involuntary because the agents stood at their front door, ‘prominently’ displayed their firearms, and asked aggressive questions,” Fishman writes. “That is simply not enough.”After questioning the Bangles on the morning of May 20, 2012, the agents had left the home, only to return five minutes later to confront them about their prior statements about unreported cash deposits, according to the pre-trial motion filed by Vincent P. Sarubbi (representing Charles Bangle) and Rocco S. Cipparone Jr. (representing Mary Bangle).“During the course of the Second Interview, the Agents prominently displayed their side arms,” they write. “The Agents were interrogating the Moving Defendants and using their weapons and Agent Maguire’s position blocking the front door to physically and mentally intimidate and coerce the Moving Defendants. The Agents never informed the Moving Defendants that the purpose of the interview was a criminal investigation until after the end of the second interview. At no time did the Agents inform the Moving Defendants that they had a right to an attorney.”The lawyers argue that the Bangles’ Miranda and Fifth Amendment rights were denied.They also suggest that the IRS made no effort to distinguish which statements were made by Charles Bangle and which by Mary Bangle. Instead, the evidence statements were presented as an amalgamation of what “The Bangles” said. As such, preparation of a defense is impossible, the lawyers wrote.“The Government expects to show that both Charles and Mary Bangle responded to the Agents’ questions, at times nodding in agreement when the other was speaking and interrupting one another to provide additional information, and each failed to contest any incriminating statements,” Fishman wrote in his response.The U.S. attorney’s response goes on to ask the judge to deny each of the defendants’ pretrial motions and to preserve the full 30-count indictment.Kugler will issue a ruling on the pretrial motions before a trial date is set.The indictment against the Bangles includes five counts of income tax evasion for 2007 through 2011, one count alleging a conspiracy to avoid paying taxes, and one count of making false statements to the IRS. Charles Bangle is also charged with 23 counts of structuring financial transactions to avoid reporting requirements.“Between 2007 and 2011, Charles and Mary Bangle skimmed large sums of cash from the business,” according to a 2014 news release from the U.S. Attorney’s Office. “Charles Bangle deposited significant amounts of that cash into their personal bank account at TD Bank in amounts less than $10,000, the amount which triggers a Currency Transaction Report from financial institutions to the U.S. Department of Treasury.”Manco & Manco has three locations on the Ocean City Boardwalk and another on the mainland in Somers Point. For most of the iconic chain’s 58-year history in Ocean City, visitors knew the spot as Mack & Manco. Anthony Mack and Vincent Manco founded the chain in 1956. The partnership between the two families ended and the name changed in 2011. Chuck Bangle, the son-in-law of former co-owners Frank and Kay Manco, purchased a controlling interest at that time.Exhibits filed with the Bangles’ pretrial motions include extensive detail on the government’s case. The documents include interviews with accountants, bank officials, shop employees and the defendants.The government interviews paint a picture of a wildly successful cash business — when cash registers fill up, bills are dropped into a slot that goes into brown paper bags in a locked cabinet below the counter. Bags of cash are dropped sometimes two or three times a day at the home of Kay Manco, according to the government’s investigation.The Macks at one point accused the Mancos of stealing from the business, according to an interview with the Bangles’ former accountant, and Bangle suspected the Macks may have provided information to start the investigation.Bank employees questioned Bangle about his pattern of deposits and reminded him of cash transaction reporting requirements, according to the documents. An auditor reportedly witnessed an employee ringing up “no sale” after a customer paid for a pizza, the documents allege.Each of the 30 counts of the indictment carries a maximum potential penalty of five years in prison and a $250,000 fine.Read the full text of the Bangle indictment.__________Sign up for OCNJ Daily’s free newsletter and breaking news alerts“Like” us on Facebooklast_img read more

Read More →

Men’s Tennis Continues Play at ITA Central Regional

first_imgExtra MatchesAndre Saleh (NEB) def. Barny Thorold (DU) 7-5, 7-6(5)Shunya Maruyama (NEB) def. Finley Hall (DU) 7-5, 6-1Hall (DU) def. Jake Fraunfelder (UMKC) 6-7(4), 6-2 (10-6)Reid Jarivs (DU) def. Hunter Harrison (ARK) 7/6(4), 6/3Chris Dean (NEB) def. Luka Jankovic (DU) 5-2David Nyman (DU) def. Corey Clarke (ARK) 1-6, 6-4(10-1)Nyman (DU) def. King (UMKC) 7-5, 7-5 Print Friendly Version Consolation singles matches will continue for the Bulldogs on Sunday. Several of Fragistas’ teammates played extra consolation singles matches led by freshman David Nyman who collected two victories Saturday. Box Score NORMAN, Okla. – Drake University men’s tennis newcomer Evan Fragistas upset Jackson Allen of Minnesota 6-4, 3-6, 7-5 in the round of 32 Saturday at the ITA Central Regional. Fragistas, who won his first two ITA matches to advance to Saturday, was then defeated by Stefano Tsorotiotis of Oklahoma 6-4, 4-6, 7-5 in a closely contested round of 16 match.center_img Round of 16Stefano Tsorotiotis (OU) def. Fragistas (DU) 6-4, 4-6, 7-5 ResultsRound of 32Evan Fragistas (DU) def. Jackson Allen (UM), 6-4, 3-6, 7-5last_img read more

Read More →

Top stories Black holes first closeup pseudoarchaeology and hunting for human pheromones

first_img(left to right): EVENT HORIZON TELESCOPE COLLABORATION ET AL.; CHRONICLE/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO; © LOUIE PSIHOYOS Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Archaeologists alarmed by the rise of what they call “pseudoarchaeology” are taking to Twitter, blogs, podcasts, and YouTube to debunk false claims about ancient civilizations, including claims that aliens helped build the Egyptian and Mayan pyramids, refugees from Atlantis brought advanced technology to cultures around the world, and European immigrants were the original inhabitants of North America. Researchers say almost all such claims depend on the racist assumption that ancient non-European societies weren’t capable of inventing sophisticated architecture, calendars, math, and astronomy on their own.Can atmospheric chemists rescue the stalled quest for a human pheromone?For decades, scientists have searched in vain for a human pheromone—a chemical signal in human body odor. Now, atmospheric chemists are using techniques for parsing atmospheric particles to breathe new life into the stalled field of inquiry. Tools of their trade, such as proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry, could aid in the hunt for pheromones—measuring the changing concentrations of compounds in real time as people react to different situations.Declassified U-2 spy plane photos are a boon for aerial archaeologyInvestigating lost historical sites, like those destroyed by the Islamic State group in Iraq and Syria, is a major challenge for archaeologists. Now, researchers are using declassified high-resolution photos taken by U.S. spy planes to reconstruct archaeological sites lost to development and war in recent decades. Declassified in 1997, the photos were taken by U-2 spy planes that flew over the Middle East, the former Soviet Union, Eastern Europe, China, South America, and Cuba during the 1950s and 1960s.This physicist is trying to make sense of the brain’s tangled networksPhysicist Danielle Bassett catapulted herself into a life of research in a largely uncharted scientific field now known as network neuroscience. A Ph.D. physicist and a MacArthur fellow by age 32, she has pioneered the use of concepts from physics and math to describe the dynamic connections in the human brain. Bassett’s lab tackles a whiplash-inducing variety of questions: Do our brains navigate words in written text the way they navigate physical space? Does the structure of college students’ brains and the structure of their social networks make it hard for them to abstain from alcohol? Bassett is now pushing to take network science beyond describing the brain to offering ways to change it. By Alex FoxApr. 12, 2019 , 2:05 PM Top stories: Black hole’s first close-up, pseudoarchaeology, and hunting for human pheromones Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country For the first time, you can see what a black hole looks likeThis week, astronomers revealed the first image ever of a black hole—the gargantuan mass at the heart of nearby galaxy Messier 87. The image, a ring of fire surrounding the blackest of shadows, is a powerful confirmation of Albert Einstein’s theory of gravity, or general relativity, which was used to predict black holes 80 years ago. It is also a feat for the team of more than 200 scientists who toiled for years to produce the image by combining signals from eight separate radio observatories spanning the globe.Believe in Atlantis? These archaeologists want to win you back to sciencelast_img read more

Read More →