Lawrence wins the medal

first_img3rd Paul Bray (7) net 73B Flight1st Jim Elphick (26) net 692nd Iain Jones (24) net 713rd Kevin Hamilton (17) net 73It was well contested to the very end as Glasgow boy Lawrence McBride won the monthly medal for March by a single stroke on net 68, edging A Flight mate Peter ‘the right honourable’ LeNoury and B Flight winner Jimmy ‘two shots’ Elphick.  Lawrence won a lead crystal whiskey decanter, a bottle of Jameson’s Irish whiskey and his name will be added to the Lewiinski’s wall of shame.  Lawrence will also receive an invite to the Gold medal to be played later in the year.Medal winner Lawrence McBride (right) is congratulated by Paul Bray.The man riding a purple patch, Aussie star Paul Bray, closed the flight with a net73.Iain Jones followed Jim Elphick up the B Flight steps with a steady net 71, leaving ‘Big’ Kevin Hamilton to tidy up the flight.Back at Lewinski’s and after the presentation, Lawrence kindly shared his whisky with the lads.Monday, March 14, Greenwood A & B – Stableford1st Gerard Lambert (24) 38pts2nd Lawrie McBride (16) 37pts3rd Merle Humphreys’ (19) 37pts4th Clair Pettitt (24) 37ptsGreenwood is a popular venue with most, regardless of the journey, so a field of 20 players set out to play the A & B layouts.  With hardly any breeze at all it was another very hot and humid day for most of the lads.Gerard Lambert won the match with a best on the day 38 points and was a stroke clear of four players: Sunday’s hero Lawrie McBride, Merle Humphreys, Bob Fagan and Sean Soden.  When the scrap was finished it was Lawrie who emerged from the heap with the silver and Merle the bronze.  Bob Fagan filled the fourth podium spot and you can guess were Sean was left.Wednesday, March 16, Pattana B & C – StablefordA Flight 1st James Brackett (7) 36pts2nd Connor Doyle (10) 34pts3rd Lawrence McBride (16) 34ptsB Flight1st Peter Henshaw (23) 39pts2nd Paul Garvey (23) 36pts3rd Thierry Temime (23) 36ptsThe forecast called for one of the hottest days of the year, although this was tempered by a slight breeze that made the day quite pleasant.A total of 26 players turned out for a day of good scoring, with James Brackett taking first place in A Flight with a solid even par round and Peter ‘ the silver surfer’ Henshaw winning B Flight with a man of the match 39 points.  Peter was three clear of Paul Garvey and Thierry Temime, with Paul edging it in the ensuing count back.James’ A Flight winning score was two clear of a quartet of players in the shape of Connor Doyle, the man on fire Scotland’s Lawrie McBride, Peter ‘the right honorable’ LeNoury and Aussie Lou ‘Zig-zag’.  When the divots had settled, it was Connor who lifted the silver and Lawrence the bronze while Peter and Lou were left standing at the bar.Friday, March 18, Burapha A & B – StablefordA Flight1st Lawrence McBride (16) 45pts2nd John Harrison (16) 43pts3rd Chris Schwen (14) 35ptsB Flight1st Thierry Temime (23) 39pts2nd Gerard Lambert (24) 38pts3rd Bob Fagan (24) 37ptsA busy week concluded with a visit to Burapha to play the A & B layouts and the players found the course to be in excellent condition while the weather was mad hot and humid.This month’s medal winner Lawrence McBride fished the week as he started by recording a fantastic 45 points; this was Lawrence’s fourth pay window visit of the week and he might just find a one way ticket to a destination of his choice in his pink envelope.John Harrison pushed Lawrence all the way with a flawless 43 points to pick up the silver while a trio of players were knotted on 35 points and when the knot was untied it was Chris Schwen who got to fill the final podium spot, leaving Paul Bray and Robert Christie at sea level and potless.The laurels in B Flight went to Thierry Temime with a rock solid 39 points.  Thierry was trailed in by one stroke increments by Gerard Lambert and Bob Fagan in that order.Note: Lewiinski’s is situated on Pattaya land Soi 1, Beach Rd Soi13/13 near Walking Street.  Anyone wishing to play with us just pop in and add your name to the list or call Peter on 086 139 6301.  Transport is provided. PSC Golf from Lewiinski’s Golf SocietySunday, March 13, Green Valley – Monthly MedalA Flight1st Lawrence McBride (16) net 682nd Peter LeNoury (13) net 69last_img read more

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Prep sports underway as McKinleyville ties Middletown

first_imgMcKinleyville >> On Friday, the high school fall sports season began, albeit a bit early.With Middletown and Clear Lake High School’s arriving to face multiple Humboldt County team’s over the weekend — approximately one week ahead of the typical start of the season — prep fall sports officially got underway with a couple of early-evening games: Middletown at McKinleyville and Clear Lake at Arcata (see Local Roundup, page C2). McKinleyville (0-0-1 overall) got a gritty goal from Hadley Ward to …last_img read more

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Universities Ban Discussion of Creation by Speakers, Students

first_imgby Jerry Bergman, Ph.D.Much is in the news lately about the University of California at Berkeley, where riots have prevented planned guest speakers from appearing.[i] The university claimed in an email about their decision to cancel a talk by Ann Coulter that they uphold the First Amendment, but canceled her talk out of “safety concerns”. As evidence, they referred to the recent riots at colleges over conservative speakers, such as a talk by Milo Yiannopoulos that was canceled in February. Coulter is a strong supporter of creation as documented in her book, Godless. [ii]In another case, when Ben Shapiro was scheduled to speak at several colleges, demonstrations rose up to stop him. Benjamin Aaron Shapiro (born January 15, 1984) comes from a Jewish family, partially from Russia. He is a conservative Republican, and a creationist.[iii] And yet the absurd reason they gave for preventing him from speaking is the claim that “Orthodox Jew Ben Shapiro Is A ‘White Supremacist’” and a “Fascist”. It’s becoming increasingly common for protestors to use ad hominem tactics to block a variety of guests from speaking at college campuses, especially creationists. [iv]cartoon by Brett MillerTo stop the censorship, an Academic Freedom bill of Rights has been proposed in various American states and in several other countries, in order to rectify the loss of freedom in many colleges and universities. Most young people today look forward to attending college. Few, though, are aware of the trends at universities that have resulted from the “political correctness” movement. Since I have been a professor at various colleges and universities for over forty years now, I am very attuned to issues related to censorship in the academic environment.Abridgement of speech—as part of the political correctness movement—is now epidemic at universities. Historical attempts by universities to block the freedom of speech of professors have been well documented, but never before have they been so blatant as recently. Colleges have even established what are called “free speech zones,” and only in these places is freedom of speech allowed!A classic example, becoming all too typical, was the case of University of New Hampshire sophomore Timothy Garneau. On September 3, 2000, 17 years ago, Garneau posted flyers in the elevator of Stoke Hall Dormitory making light of common frustrations that students experience in riding elevators. The elevators tend to be overcrowded because, instead of taking the stairs, many students take the elevator to go up only one or two floors.In a hastily produced flyer, corrected here for grammar, he said, “nine out of ten freshmen girls gain ten to fifteen pounds. But there is something you can do about it. If you live below the sixth floor, take the stairs. Not only will you feel better, but you will also be saving time and will look better.”  This comment was deemed by some to be both “sexist” and “discriminatory” toward obese people (one of the latest of many “victim” groups in our society that the government has ruled deserving of special rights.)Garneau was confronted about his message. He become fearful that he would be punished for his expression of free speech. His fear turned out to be valid. At first, he tried to deny his involvement, but was eventually forced to admit his “mistake” of having expressed a politically incorrect opinion. Charged with violation of “affirmative action” policies, harassment, and “conduct which (sic) is disorderly and lewd,” Garneau was expelled from student housing, given extended disciplinary probation, required to meet with a psychologist to discuss “his problem,” write a three-thousand-word reflection paper, and to publish an apology in the newspaper. Forced out of student housing, he was then compelled to live in his 1994 Ford Contour for three weeks.Garneau appealed his punishment within the university, but lost. The Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) took his case, claiming that the university violated his constitutionally protected free speech rights. FIRE attorneys argued that the university had no business investigating constitutionally protected free speech in the first place. Thanks to FIRE and their aggressive stand against the university (and FIRE’s long record for winning scores of similar cases when universities attempt to deny free speech as they often do nowadays), Garneau was eventually allowed to move back into a dormitory – but a different one, because it was deemed that someone so insensitive to the “rights of minorities” must be relocated.Ironically, many universities tend to ignore behavior that many of us common folk regard as inappropriate—such as foul language or sexual immorality, and focus instead on what most people regard as trivial. My guess is, after this experience, Mr. Garneau will be afraid to say almost anything to anybody around the university.The problem is so great that the President of the Study of Popular Culture, David Horowitz, has drafted a bill titled “Academic Bill of Rights” to defend the basic constitutional rights of students and faculty. While not a perfect bill, it will go a long way to ensure that the freedom most Americans take for granted in our daily life will also exist in our colleges. Unfortunately, since this 17-year-old case, things have only gotten worse, much worse, in America today.cartoon for CEH by Brett MillerDr. Jim Nelson Black, in his 2012 book Freefall of the American University: How Our Colleges are Corrupting the Minds and Morals of the Next Generation, says that a major problem now is that “faculty members take great pains to exclude not just conservative ideas but also religion” from the college environment.[v]  The substance of his concern is that students are not allowed to “articulate a point of view that might be considered by another party as exclusivist.” Black argues that the liberal view concludes that “we have no grounds for determining what is true; therefore, any claim to truth must be discounted and disavowed. This means, of course, that religious beliefs which rely on revelation and absolute standards of truth, have no home in the academy.”Expressing hesitation about Darwin is considered irretrievable intellectual suicide, the unthinkable doubt, the unpardonable sin of academia. —Richard HalvorsenIn an article for the Harvard Crimson, Richard Halvorson expressed the same concern, namely that “bias against conservative religious beliefs on campus, and particularly the bias against any view that does not support the reigning Darwinian orthodoxy” is a major problem.[vi]  In his critique, Halvorson said, “intellectual honesty requires rationally examining our fundamental premises—yet expressing hesitation about Darwin is considered irretrievable intellectual suicide, the unthinkable doubt, the unpardonable sin of academia.”[vii]He went on to conclude that, “Although the postmodern era questions everything else—the possibility of knowledge, basic morality, and reality itself—critical discussion of Darwin is taboo … the basic premise of evolution remains a scientific Holy of Holies, despite our absurd skepticism in other areas.”  The university, which has made a fetish of skewering sacred cows, is now in the position of giving what Black calls “an unproven theory of origins by uncertain nineteenth-century students of natural history the status of Holy Writ. The modern university has no religion but Darwinism.” Halvorson concluded that, “We must reject intellectual excommunication as a valid form of dealing with criticism: the most important question for any society to ask is the one that is forbidden.” That’s exactly what liberals used to believe 50 years ago.In a study done before the 2016 elections, five people were interviewed. One,Kaylee, a structural biologist at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, stays quiet when her colleagues talk about politics and religion. As a Catholic with conservative tendencies, she feels that her beliefs are unwelcome in academic institutions, where liberal views often prevail. The strain is particularly acute this year: Kaylee favors Donald Trump for US president.[viii]The problem Kaylee feared (with good reason, it turns out) is that “supporting Trump could harm her job prospects.” For this reason, Kaylee—a postdoc—asked Nature to refer to her by a pseudonym. Her fears do not surprise Colby College (Waterville, Maine) sociologist Neil Gross, because surveys have documentedthat conservative faculty members are a minority in US universities, although the proportion varies by field. “My sense is that the candidacy of Donald Trump has really intensified disputes that were there already in academic life,” Gross says. “If Republicans in academia and science felt uncomfortable before, I think the candidacy of Mr. Trump has made them all the more uncomfortable.”[ix]Another scientist agrees. “‘The current status quo seems like it’s not working for a lot of Americans,’ says one Trump-supporting chemist at the University of Pittsburgh in Pennsylvania, who asked for anonymity. ‘I’m hopeful for a modest improvement, and that’s about as much as I can hope.’”[x] In short, as the November 8th, 2016 election drew near, some “scientists who support Trump worry that political discussions in the lab will not only harm their careers in the long term, but also hinder current collaborations with colleagues, and waste time.”[xi]The basic premise of evolution remains a scientific Holy of Holies, despite our absurd skepticism in other areas…. The modern university has no religion but Darwinism. —Halvorsen[i] Holly Epstein Ojalvo. Do controversial figures have a right to speak at public universities? 2017. USA Today College Edition.[ii] Godless: The Church of Liberalism. Crown Forum, New York. 2006. See pages 198 to 281.[iii] Behold the mental gymnastics: Ben Shapiro On the Creation Story Vs The Big Bang Theory. Reddit.com https://www.reddit.com/r/atheism/comments/54ffzh/behold_the_mental_gymnastics_ben_shapiro_on_the/[iv]Berkeley Agitators Say Orthodox Jew Ben Shapiro Is A ‘White Supremacist’. The Daily Caller, 9/10/17. http://dailycaller.com/2017/09/10/berkeley-agitators-say-orthodox-jew-ben-shapiro-is-a-white-supremacist/[v] Dr. Jim Nelson Black, Freefall of the American University: How Our Colleges are Corrupting the Minds and Morals of the Next Generation (2012), p. 230.[vi] Halvorson, Richard. 2003. “Confessions of a Skeptic.” The Harvard Crimson, April 7, 2003, p. 4.[vii]  Halvorson, p. 4.[viii] Sara Reardon. 2016. The scientists who support Donald Trump Science policy fades into background for many who back Republican candidate in US presidential race. Nature. 298(538):298-299, 2016, p. 298.[ix] Reardon, 2016, p. 298[x] Reardon, 2016, p. 299.[xi]  Reardon, 2016, p. 299.Dr Jerry Bergman, professor, author and speaker, is a frequent contributor to Creation-Evolution Headlines. See his Author Profile for his CV and previous articles. (Visited 844 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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On the Jobsite with Foamglas

first_imgWhy we need a product like FoamglasI’ve written often about the problems with extruded polystyrene from an environmental and health perspective. Relative to performance, extruded polystyrene (XPS) is a great product. It is water-resistant so can be used below-grade; it has high compressive strength so can be used beneath a concrete slab floor; it insulates very well (R-5 per inch); and it’s inexpensive. These properties make XPS the nearly universal choice for sub-slab and exterior foundation insulation today.But along with these benefits are some significant downsides. All XPS today (as well as expanded polystyrene, EPS) is made with the brominated flame retardant HBCD that has recently been added to the Stockholm list of Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) and is being banned in much of the world. HBCD provides some level of fire protection, though some studies suggest that its benefits are greatly exaggerated — and that that protection, if real, is irrelevant below grade. RELATED ARTICLES Foamglas — My New Favorite Insulation MaterialGBA Product Guide: FoamglasAvoiding the Global Warming Product of Insulation Stone veneer cement makes a good adhesiveWe installed four inches of Foamglas under the basement floor slab and six inches on the exterior of the foundation walls. Our designer/builder, Eli Gould, and his six-person crew not only did admirably with this little-known material, but he came up with what I believe is a great option for adhering Foamglas to a foundation wall.We were debating whether to use Pittsburgh Corning’s recommended solvent-based adhesive (“tar”) or their acrylic formula (a greener, water-based tar), which apparently doesn’t have quite as good performance properties as the solvent-based option. But the recommended solvent-based formulation sounded quite hazardous (it’s a two-component adhesive with one component consisting of three different types of diisocyanate and the other component consisting of petroleum asphalt, coal bitumen, naphthenic distillate, and hydrocarbon solvents). We wanted a well-performing adhesive, but the solvent-based option didn’t sound like something we wanted to expose workers to during installation or surround our home with. Eli tested different engineered cement products, as modern polymers have dramatically changed the adhesive capabilities of cement in the last couple decades. They are also free of VOCs and sounded far safer from a health and environmental standpoint.We settled on a polymer cement product  made by Ardex used for adhering stone veneer onto masonry walls, and it worked beautifully. The two companies (Ardex and Pittsburgh Corning) were so intrigued by our field-testing that they have begun conversations about testing and developing this alternative adhesive system.Ardex also supplies a waterproofing coating that we applied over the Foamglas on the foundation walls: Ardicoat Plus. We used this in place of conventional asphalt-based (tar) coating, and I feel really good about not having hydrocarbons from the coating seeping into the groundwater or being released as VOCs. In addition, XPS is currently made with the blowing agent HFC-134a, which is a potent greenhouse gas that contributes to global warming. And some of the petrochemical-derived raw materials, including benzene and styrene monomer, are carcinogenic — though once converted into polystyrene, that carcinogenicity is not present.From a performance standpoint, XPS — like most other foam plastic insulation materials — is readily tunneled through by subterranean termites, carpenter ants, and other wood-boring insects. In my role with Environmental Building News and our GreenSpec Product Database, I get plenty of opportunities to research and write about innovative building products. That’s one of the really fun aspects of my job.On occasion I also get an opportunity to try out new or little-known materials. In the construction of our new home in Dummerston, Vermont — actually the rebuilding of a 200-year Cape — I’ve had opportunity to get some real experience with lots of products. One of these is a cellular glass insulation material known as Foamglas. Foamglas to the rescueFoamglas is a cellular glass, rigid boardstock insulation material. It has high compressive strength, excellent moisture resistance, and tremendous fire resistance without the use of flame retardants. It is moderately well-insulating at R-3.4 per inch (32% lower than XPS), and it’s made without environmentally damaging blowing agents. It is also about the only insulation material that is totally impervious to wood-boring insects — a useful property for below-grade applications — particularly in a warming planet with termites extending their ranges north.Foamglas has actually been around a long time — since Pittsburgh Corning introduced it in the 1930s — but it is used primarily for high-temperature industrial applications, such as insulating steam pipes and furnaces. It’s use as an insulation material for buildings remains very uncommon, though this use is increasing in Europe.Even though Foamglas is significantly more expensive than XPS and its per-inch insulating value is lower, the environmental and health benefits made me want to try it out on our own home. Compared to XPS, it costs more and has a lower R-valueOur foundation ends up with a respectable R-12 under the basement slab and R-22 on the exterior of the foundation walls. That’s not up to the insulation levels in a typical Passivhaus, but it should be good enough to enable us to achieve net-zero-energy performance with a PV system supplying power for an air-source heat pump. And it should last literally hundreds of years — a lifespan that I believe we should be aiming for in home building today.We spent more for the Foamglas foundation insulation than we would have with XPS, but it feels good to have put my money where my mouth is relative to spurring product innovation and demonstrating greener building material options.Eli and I also hope that by leading this sort of collaboration we may be able to help drive down the costs while broadening the market for Foamglas and other innovative products. With Foamglas and other inorganic products like this that may come along, we hope to see more durable, insect-resistant foundation systems that can help reduce energy consumption while minimizing health and environmental impacts.  Foundations are not the only part of the building in which Eli and I plan to help companies “connect the dots” in developing better buildings. We’re working on innovative window solutions for existing homes, superinsulated roof systems, and modular components to speed construction — but those are topics for future columns.Who knows, maybe we can even convince some leading manufacturers to move to the Brattleboro area and help to spur economic development in the region. Alex is founder of BuildingGreen, Inc. and executive editor of Environmental Building News. He also recently created the Resilient Design Institute. To keep up with Alex’s latest articles and musings, you can sign up for his Twitter feed.last_img read more

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South Africa inflict innings defeat on India

first_imgFirst day’s gloom seemed to have rubbed on to India’s fortunes as the visitors fell to a humiliating innings and 25-run defeat against South Africa at the SuperSport Park in Centurion on Sunday. ScoreSachin Tendulkar celebrates his 50th Test ton in Centurion on Sunday. Agency photoThe only bright spot in the Test was Sachin Tendulkar’s 50th Test century.Some even say India had lost the match the very moment captain Mahendra Singh Dhoni lost the toss.And they weren’t completely wrong, for on a damp wicket with conditions assisting the pacers, there was little that the India batsmen could do after opposition captain Graeme Smith forced them in.As expected the famed India battling line-up folded up like a pack of cards with nine wickets falling on the day save skipper Dhoni, who fell the next day to Morne Morkel.Morkel finished with a five-wicket haul while Dale Steyn took three as India wrapped their first innings on a measly 136.The sun came out bright on Friday and the pitch was dry – perfect conditions for forging batting alliances. And that’s precisely what South Africa did – forge partnerships.The most noteworthy was Hashim Amla and all-rounder Jacques Kallis’s 230-run partnership. While Amla scored 140 before getting out to Ishant Sharma the next day, Kallis remained unbeaten scoring his maiden double ton.Later, Kallis forged a partnership with AB de Villiers to put 224 on board. De Villiers punished the Indian attack, that looked toothless in the absence of injured paceman Zaheer, making a quick-fire 129.advertisementIn fact, his century was so hasty that it entered the record books as the fastest ton by a South African in Test cricket. He reached the mark in just 75 balls.The plight eased for the Indians when the host decided to declare the innings on 620/4 – a commanding 484-run lead in their bag.With a good lead in hand, the South African fielders were in a mood to relax and that showed in their sloppy fielding as they gave the Indian openers Virender Sehwag and Gautam Gambhir five lives before leading them back to the pavilion on 63 and 80 respectively.The fourth day’s proceedings only saw the India batsmen walk in and out of the pavilion as the Proteas tightened the noose.Finally, Sachin Tendulkar and skipper Mahendra Singh Dhoni got on with the rescue operation putting on 172 runs for the seventh wicket.Tendulkar went on to complete his much-desired half-century of Test tons with Dhoni aptly supporting him.No sooner did Tendulkar achieve the target that Dhoni fell, giving an impression that he was only in the middle to help Sachin’s cause.A Dale Steyn delivery that climbed on him had Dhoni fend for cover and in the process he gave away an edge to Mark Boucher behind the stumps. He was out for 90.Post his dismissal Paul Harris accounted for Harbhajan Singh’s wicket to fast track India’s loss. The game could have got over in minutes, but bad weather stopped play and soon stumps were called.Minutes into the fifth day Sachin Tendulkar was standing at the crease unbeaten on 111 as the scoreboard read – South Africa win by an innings and 25 runs – a massive and humiliating defeat for the No. 1 Test team in the world.last_img read more

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Learning will be fun with new mobile applications, gazettes

first_imgK. Sharat Chandra, 32, Founder of Butterfly Fields. Creates maths and science card games,board games and activities for children mapped to the curriculum of various syllabi-ICSE and CBSE.The company has created 350 models so far.As a 12-year-old playing Scrabble and Canasta with his grandparents in Jodhpur, Manuj Dhariwal, now 26,,K. Sharat Chandra, 32, Founder of Butterfly Fields. Creates maths and science card games,board games and activities for children mapped to the curriculum of various syllabi-ICSE and CBSE.The company has created 350 models so far.As a 12-year-old playing Scrabble and Canasta with his grandparents in Jodhpur, Manuj Dhariwal, now 26, never imagined he would one day create his very own board game. In 2008, the graduate in design engineering from IIT-Guwahati, with brother Rajat, 29, and sister-in-law Madhumita, 30, launched Aksharit, India’s first board game in Hindi. With 200 tiles (100 each for aksharas and matras), it went on to win the first prize at the Ideas to Implementation competition at IIM-Calcutta in 2008. Over the past four years, the colourful board game has made Hindi fun for over 300,000 students across 3,000 rural and government schools in Chhattisgarh, Madhya Pradesh and Rajasthan. And the trio of IIT graduates has now taken Aksharit pan-India in 11 regional languages and into cyberspace with a digital version. “Games have the power to make learning effortless and fun and instil an ability to take on challenges,” says Manuj, founder of MadRat Games, their company.Like the MadRat team, several professionals are changing the way young India learns. Giving textbooks and blackboards a miss, these new-age educators are devising games and infusing large doses of innovative technology to make learning more interactive and engaging. Be it honing your sports skills or learning the skeletal system with 3D models, there is a movement to instil fun and entertainment in the education process.Soumya Banerjee, 52, Founder of Attano.com. Cartoon Network along with Attano,a site with educational e-books,launched video e-books and interactive activity books,based on the channel’s brands like Ben 10,Generator Rex and the Powerpuff Girls.K. Sharat Chandra, 32, decided to teach young children the basics of arithmetic with a tweaked version of the popular snakes and ladders game, a staple in most homes. So, in 2005, the IIT-IIM alumnus set up Butterfly Fields in Hyderabad as a hobby centre for children to learn concepts of science and mathematics. In 2008, he partnered with schools to set up mini science centres and create concept maps and e-learning content for teachers. With 4,000 private and government schools in Andhra Pradesh, Tamil Nadu and Karnataka on his rolls, Chandra now creates math and science card games, board games and activities for children that are mapped to the curriculum of various syllabi, including Andhra Pradesh state board, ICSE and CBSE. “A child learns better through action rather than by reading or even watching a video of a concept being explained. We focus on ensuring that the child learns concepts by understanding underlying principles,” says Chandra, whose company has created over 350 such models and games.Technology, too, is giving these new ideas a boost, teaching subjects in a format that the GenNext enjoys best- e-books and mobile apps. Soumya Banerjee, 52, founded Attano.com in 2009 and took textbooks to the digital world. These books allow readers to bookmark pages, scribble notes and even map a child’s learning pattern and provide assessments. “Technology allows the book to evolve and integrate media through audio and video clips. Also, students in any corner of the country can access the same book,” says Banerjee, who is based in Mumbai. With a master’s degree in computer science from the University of Houston, US, he wanted to use his 20 years of corporate experience to bring about a change in education. His 200 books currently have 50,000 users.Dev Roy, 39, Founder,Leapstart. It offers physical education and sports programmes from kindergarten to high school.The modules are age-appropriate and progressive.Sensing that the mobile-bred generation gorges on anything that flashes on the palmtop screen, in December 2011 Jaipur-based Prafulla Mathur, 29, launched Money Games, a mobile app that teaches children the basics of banking. Besides decoding terms such as savings, assets, bank accounts and liabilities, children learn to set goals and plan their finances to achieve these goals in a desired time period. “Educational apps can bring science to life in ways a textbook can’t. In terms of children’s education, technology extends learning in the same way as Lego blocks and other art materials, exposing children to animals, landscapes and activities that they cannot experience in person,” says Mathur, who came back to India in 2009 after a stint in the banking industry in the UK to start his company Queppelin.Marrying technology with education, 40-year-old Sanjeev Mansotra’s CORE Education and Technologies pioneered 3D education in India. In the company’s portable 3D lab in Mumbai, students can learn human anatomy with 3D skeletal systems and organs rather than chalk-onboard diagrams. “Technology makes education more attractive, lucrative and comprehensive. Tech-education is in line with the Government of India’s agenda of access, inclusion and quality in education,” he says.While most focus on academic education solutions, Srinivas Rao Cheedella, 39, and his colleague Anurag Jain, 40, quit their jobs with Dell Services in 2010 to set up India’s largest vocational training institute. They wanted to “bridge the gap of eight million between the demand and supply of skilled manpower across vocational streams”. Two years later, their company Laurus Edutech has 140 centres across India and trains over 34,000 people every year to become electricians, welders, medical lab assistants, tailors and auto mechanics. Besides technical training, the centre uses educational games to teach the importance of ethics and professional conduct. “At the end of each game, the purpose is to drive home the message that being a good worker reaps more benefits. Aside from teaching theory, we also want to build the character of our students but merely preaching is ineffective,” says Cheedella.Manuj Dhariwal, 26, Founder, Madrat. Created Aksharit, the first ever Scrabble-like board game in Hindi.Aksharit is used by 300,000 children in schools in Rajasthan, Chhattisgarh and Madhya Pradesh.When Dev Roy, 39, returned to India in 2009 after a successful career with Barclay’s Capital in London, he decided to help Bangalore children take to sports. Nostalgic about the city he grew up in, he started LeapStart, which offers physical education and sports programmes from kindergarten to high school. Their play modules include elements of SPARK, a researchbased public health organisation of San Diego State University Research Foundation, whose programmes promote lifelong wellness. Here, children are taught unconventional lessons like how to fall without injuring themselves and social skills like how to interact with each other. The modules are ageappropriate and progressive. There is even a specially-designed physical education programme for children with learning disabilities. “If you have not played a sport as a child, or done theatre for example, when you enter the world of finance at 21, you are not equipped with life skills such as how to cooperate while competing or how to be a leader,” he says. The company has 100 schools as part of its programmes.With young Indian parents adopting a new approach to education, these new-age services are fast catching on. Meritnation.com started in 2009 with an initial funding of Rs 11.5 crore from Info Edge (India), but within two years raised Rs 20 crore. The site offers study material in the forms of fun academic formats like quizzes, videos, games and puzzles. The resources follow the syllabi of CBSE, ICSE and 12 state boards and the site already has a virtual “classroom” of 3.2 million students from across the country. “We realised that visuals and animation not only make learning fun but also retention easier. While children get to play games, parents know these games are constructive,” says Pavan Chauhan, 38, who founded Meritnation.com with fellow IIM-Bgraduate Ritesh Hemrajani. “It is important to customise learning according to the assimilation levels and competency of every child. An effective classroom would be one where children can access relevant materials,” says Chauhan, who has 20 years of teaching experience with The Learning Tree and Disha Public School.Giving a modern twist to academics, these new-age educators are making learning entertaining for today’s wired generation.- With Devika Chaturvedi, Ayesha Aleem, Mona Ramavat and Sonali Acharjee.advertisementadvertisementadvertisementlast_img read more

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