Five Bulldogs Score In Double Figures As Men’s Basketball Defeats Evansville, 88-76

first_img Preview Buy Tickets Live Stats 1350 ESPN Des Moines Mediacom MC22 Listen Live Watch Live Indiana State 1/11/2017 – 7 p.m. Box Score (PDF) Story Links Next Game: Photo Gallery center_img In addition to Arogundade’s three-pointers, Schlatter and Timmer made 10-straight free throw in the final four minutes on an afternoon that saw the team shoot 23-of-25 (92.0 percent) from the free-throw line. As a team, the Bulldogs shot 50 percent from the field in the second half while committing just two turnovers in the period to start the MVC season 2-2 for the first time since the 2010-11 season.The Bulldogs continue their homestead on Wednesday, Jan. 11, for ‘We Back The Blue Night.’ Tipoff is scheduled for 7 p.m. The game will broadcast live on Mediacom MC22 and on radio via ESPN Des Moines 1350-AM. As part of ‘We Back The Blue Night,’ all law enforcement officials and their families receive free admission by showing their badge at the door. Click here for more information on ‘We Back The Blue Night.’Print Friendly Version Box Score (HTML) DES MOINES, Iowa – The Drake University men’s basketball team outscored Evansville by 12 points in the final four minutes of an 88-76 win Sunday, Jan. 8, at the Knapp Center. The win was Drake’s third-straight on its home court and improved the Bulldogs to 2-2 in the Missouri Valley Conference.Drake (4-12, 2-2 MVC) was led by season-high 28 points from junior Reed Timmer (New Berlin, Wis.) who finished just two points shy of a career-high while shooting 8-of-12 from the floor and 4-of-7 from the three-point arc. Ore Arogundade (Chicago, Ill.) added a career-high 17 points with seven rebounds. The junior also drained two critical three-pointers with less than three minutes to play as part of a 12-0 run to give the Bulldogs a 10-point cushion heading into the final minute of play.”You just have to believe in yourself and your teammates,” Arogundade said of his late six-point flurry. “Coach Rutter has done a really good job of instilling confidence in all of us so when I saw the shot, I let it fly.”Arogundade and Timmer were joined by three other Bulldogs, Casey Schlatter (Iowa Falls, Iowa), De’Antae McMurry (Alton, Ill.) and T.J. Thomas (Stone Mountain, Ga.) in double figures with 11, 10 and 10 points, respectively.The MVC’s leading scorer, Jaylon Brown, led Evansville (10-7, 1-3 MVC) with 23 points, 15 of them in the first half.Evansville claimed its first lead of the game six minutes into the second half as part of a 9-0 run and neither team led by more than a possession for the next 12 minutes. With four minutes left, Evansville’s Ryan Taylor hit a three-pointer to give the Aces a 72-70 lead. However, the Bulldogs’ defense clamped down and held Evansville without a field goal for the next 3:35 while assembling a 12-0 run to take a commanding lead into the final minute.”It was really back-and-forth until the end,” said Drake head coach Jeff Rutter. “We had not had a string of stops until the 3:40 mark where we had a string of five-straight stops when we moved to man-to-man down the stretch.” Full Schedule Roster last_img read more

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Mailbag: what role will Haley play in his return to Sharks?

first_imgPITTSBURGH — The arms on the clock are racing past 1 a.m and the bar is starting to clear out. You better get that last drink in before the lights come on.With four days and change remaining before Monday’s trade deadline, it’s last call for deadline-related questions. By the time we reconvene next week, the Sharks could be playing with a shiny-new toy, their Western Conference rivals could be showing off new wardrobes and the NHL as we know it might be drastically different.The weekend …last_img read more

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Universities Ban Discussion of Creation by Speakers, Students

first_imgby Jerry Bergman, Ph.D.Much is in the news lately about the University of California at Berkeley, where riots have prevented planned guest speakers from appearing.[i] The university claimed in an email about their decision to cancel a talk by Ann Coulter that they uphold the First Amendment, but canceled her talk out of “safety concerns”. As evidence, they referred to the recent riots at colleges over conservative speakers, such as a talk by Milo Yiannopoulos that was canceled in February. Coulter is a strong supporter of creation as documented in her book, Godless. [ii]In another case, when Ben Shapiro was scheduled to speak at several colleges, demonstrations rose up to stop him. Benjamin Aaron Shapiro (born January 15, 1984) comes from a Jewish family, partially from Russia. He is a conservative Republican, and a creationist.[iii] And yet the absurd reason they gave for preventing him from speaking is the claim that “Orthodox Jew Ben Shapiro Is A ‘White Supremacist’” and a “Fascist”. It’s becoming increasingly common for protestors to use ad hominem tactics to block a variety of guests from speaking at college campuses, especially creationists. [iv]cartoon by Brett MillerTo stop the censorship, an Academic Freedom bill of Rights has been proposed in various American states and in several other countries, in order to rectify the loss of freedom in many colleges and universities. Most young people today look forward to attending college. Few, though, are aware of the trends at universities that have resulted from the “political correctness” movement. Since I have been a professor at various colleges and universities for over forty years now, I am very attuned to issues related to censorship in the academic environment.Abridgement of speech—as part of the political correctness movement—is now epidemic at universities. Historical attempts by universities to block the freedom of speech of professors have been well documented, but never before have they been so blatant as recently. Colleges have even established what are called “free speech zones,” and only in these places is freedom of speech allowed!A classic example, becoming all too typical, was the case of University of New Hampshire sophomore Timothy Garneau. On September 3, 2000, 17 years ago, Garneau posted flyers in the elevator of Stoke Hall Dormitory making light of common frustrations that students experience in riding elevators. The elevators tend to be overcrowded because, instead of taking the stairs, many students take the elevator to go up only one or two floors.In a hastily produced flyer, corrected here for grammar, he said, “nine out of ten freshmen girls gain ten to fifteen pounds. But there is something you can do about it. If you live below the sixth floor, take the stairs. Not only will you feel better, but you will also be saving time and will look better.”  This comment was deemed by some to be both “sexist” and “discriminatory” toward obese people (one of the latest of many “victim” groups in our society that the government has ruled deserving of special rights.)Garneau was confronted about his message. He become fearful that he would be punished for his expression of free speech. His fear turned out to be valid. At first, he tried to deny his involvement, but was eventually forced to admit his “mistake” of having expressed a politically incorrect opinion. Charged with violation of “affirmative action” policies, harassment, and “conduct which (sic) is disorderly and lewd,” Garneau was expelled from student housing, given extended disciplinary probation, required to meet with a psychologist to discuss “his problem,” write a three-thousand-word reflection paper, and to publish an apology in the newspaper. Forced out of student housing, he was then compelled to live in his 1994 Ford Contour for three weeks.Garneau appealed his punishment within the university, but lost. The Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) took his case, claiming that the university violated his constitutionally protected free speech rights. FIRE attorneys argued that the university had no business investigating constitutionally protected free speech in the first place. Thanks to FIRE and their aggressive stand against the university (and FIRE’s long record for winning scores of similar cases when universities attempt to deny free speech as they often do nowadays), Garneau was eventually allowed to move back into a dormitory – but a different one, because it was deemed that someone so insensitive to the “rights of minorities” must be relocated.Ironically, many universities tend to ignore behavior that many of us common folk regard as inappropriate—such as foul language or sexual immorality, and focus instead on what most people regard as trivial. My guess is, after this experience, Mr. Garneau will be afraid to say almost anything to anybody around the university.The problem is so great that the President of the Study of Popular Culture, David Horowitz, has drafted a bill titled “Academic Bill of Rights” to defend the basic constitutional rights of students and faculty. While not a perfect bill, it will go a long way to ensure that the freedom most Americans take for granted in our daily life will also exist in our colleges. Unfortunately, since this 17-year-old case, things have only gotten worse, much worse, in America today.cartoon for CEH by Brett MillerDr. Jim Nelson Black, in his 2012 book Freefall of the American University: How Our Colleges are Corrupting the Minds and Morals of the Next Generation, says that a major problem now is that “faculty members take great pains to exclude not just conservative ideas but also religion” from the college environment.[v]  The substance of his concern is that students are not allowed to “articulate a point of view that might be considered by another party as exclusivist.” Black argues that the liberal view concludes that “we have no grounds for determining what is true; therefore, any claim to truth must be discounted and disavowed. This means, of course, that religious beliefs which rely on revelation and absolute standards of truth, have no home in the academy.”Expressing hesitation about Darwin is considered irretrievable intellectual suicide, the unthinkable doubt, the unpardonable sin of academia. —Richard HalvorsenIn an article for the Harvard Crimson, Richard Halvorson expressed the same concern, namely that “bias against conservative religious beliefs on campus, and particularly the bias against any view that does not support the reigning Darwinian orthodoxy” is a major problem.[vi]  In his critique, Halvorson said, “intellectual honesty requires rationally examining our fundamental premises—yet expressing hesitation about Darwin is considered irretrievable intellectual suicide, the unthinkable doubt, the unpardonable sin of academia.”[vii]He went on to conclude that, “Although the postmodern era questions everything else—the possibility of knowledge, basic morality, and reality itself—critical discussion of Darwin is taboo … the basic premise of evolution remains a scientific Holy of Holies, despite our absurd skepticism in other areas.”  The university, which has made a fetish of skewering sacred cows, is now in the position of giving what Black calls “an unproven theory of origins by uncertain nineteenth-century students of natural history the status of Holy Writ. The modern university has no religion but Darwinism.” Halvorson concluded that, “We must reject intellectual excommunication as a valid form of dealing with criticism: the most important question for any society to ask is the one that is forbidden.” That’s exactly what liberals used to believe 50 years ago.In a study done before the 2016 elections, five people were interviewed. One,Kaylee, a structural biologist at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, stays quiet when her colleagues talk about politics and religion. As a Catholic with conservative tendencies, she feels that her beliefs are unwelcome in academic institutions, where liberal views often prevail. The strain is particularly acute this year: Kaylee favors Donald Trump for US president.[viii]The problem Kaylee feared (with good reason, it turns out) is that “supporting Trump could harm her job prospects.” For this reason, Kaylee—a postdoc—asked Nature to refer to her by a pseudonym. Her fears do not surprise Colby College (Waterville, Maine) sociologist Neil Gross, because surveys have documentedthat conservative faculty members are a minority in US universities, although the proportion varies by field. “My sense is that the candidacy of Donald Trump has really intensified disputes that were there already in academic life,” Gross says. “If Republicans in academia and science felt uncomfortable before, I think the candidacy of Mr. Trump has made them all the more uncomfortable.”[ix]Another scientist agrees. “‘The current status quo seems like it’s not working for a lot of Americans,’ says one Trump-supporting chemist at the University of Pittsburgh in Pennsylvania, who asked for anonymity. ‘I’m hopeful for a modest improvement, and that’s about as much as I can hope.’”[x] In short, as the November 8th, 2016 election drew near, some “scientists who support Trump worry that political discussions in the lab will not only harm their careers in the long term, but also hinder current collaborations with colleagues, and waste time.”[xi]The basic premise of evolution remains a scientific Holy of Holies, despite our absurd skepticism in other areas…. The modern university has no religion but Darwinism. —Halvorsen[i] Holly Epstein Ojalvo. Do controversial figures have a right to speak at public universities? 2017. USA Today College Edition.[ii] Godless: The Church of Liberalism. Crown Forum, New York. 2006. See pages 198 to 281.[iii] Behold the mental gymnastics: Ben Shapiro On the Creation Story Vs The Big Bang Theory. Reddit.com https://www.reddit.com/r/atheism/comments/54ffzh/behold_the_mental_gymnastics_ben_shapiro_on_the/[iv]Berkeley Agitators Say Orthodox Jew Ben Shapiro Is A ‘White Supremacist’. The Daily Caller, 9/10/17. http://dailycaller.com/2017/09/10/berkeley-agitators-say-orthodox-jew-ben-shapiro-is-a-white-supremacist/[v] Dr. Jim Nelson Black, Freefall of the American University: How Our Colleges are Corrupting the Minds and Morals of the Next Generation (2012), p. 230.[vi] Halvorson, Richard. 2003. “Confessions of a Skeptic.” The Harvard Crimson, April 7, 2003, p. 4.[vii]  Halvorson, p. 4.[viii] Sara Reardon. 2016. The scientists who support Donald Trump Science policy fades into background for many who back Republican candidate in US presidential race. Nature. 298(538):298-299, 2016, p. 298.[ix] Reardon, 2016, p. 298[x] Reardon, 2016, p. 299.[xi]  Reardon, 2016, p. 299.Dr Jerry Bergman, professor, author and speaker, is a frequent contributor to Creation-Evolution Headlines. See his Author Profile for his CV and previous articles. (Visited 844 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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World Cup of Disabled Golf tees off in South Africa

first_img21 May 2014The South African Disabled Golf Association will break new ground this week with the hosting of the inaugural World Cup of Disabled Golf, which tees off at Zebula Golf Estate and Spa in Limpopo province on Wednesday.The event is a 54-hole stroke-play championship and has drawn entries from Australia, Canada, England, New Zealand, Sweden and the United States.In-form rising stars Daniel Slabbert and Reinard Schuhknecht will partner with seasoned campaigner Conrad Scholtz in chasing down a home victory.‘A really big deal’Kathu’s Slabbert said there is a lot of pride at stake for the South African team. “The World Cup is a really big deal, but to tee it up for South Africa here at home is huge,” the three-time Nedbank SA Disabled Golf Open champion said in a statement on Tuesday.“We are South Africa’s first disabled golfers to earn national colours, along with our team manager, Eugene Vorster. We all definitely feel the pressure, because to wear the green and gold is an enormous honour for any athlete.“The South African Disabled Golf Association worked incredibly hard to make this event happen and we want to do the country proud by winning the first World Cup.”Schuhknecht believes the South African trio have had enough laps around the 6 829 metre Zebula layout over the last week to prepare for the challenge.“We all played in the Nedbank SA Disabled Golf Open here last week and we’ve had some practice rounds since, so we are definitely ready for the World Cup,” the 2013 World One-Arm Stroke Play champion explained.“However, every team here wants to be the first winners of the World Cup, so the competition will be stiff. We just have to give it our best shot and make sure we come out on top.”Stranglehold brokenJust a week ago, reigning Canadian and American amputee golf champion Josh Williams broke Slabbert’s stronghold on the country’s premier disabled golf tournament and added the South African Disabled Open title to his tally.The Kitchener native is relishing the chance to win the inaugural World Cup for Canada alongside Johannes Grames and Robert MacDermott.“I love team competitions, so I am really looking forward to the challenge this week,” Williams said.“It’s a fine thing to own three national titles, but in a team competition, it’s all down to how you perform on the day.“We had a great practice round, and I’m confident we’ll do well here. The course is in fantastic nick, despite the struggles they have had with drought in this neck of the woods.“It’s a long layout, but it is very fair and if you go off-line here, you will pay the price.”‘Tough competition’The Canada Post employee said he is expecting a tough week. “We have some serious competition here this week,” he said. “Daniel and Reinard finished second and third last week, so they will be looking for a home victory and a little revenge. But we also have guys like Geoff Nicholas from Australia, Kenny Bonz and Tracy Ramin from the USA, who can be dangerous.“As far as I am concerned, everyone has brought their A-game and the World Cup is wide open.”Multiple US Amputee Championship winner Nicholas will partner Graham Kenyon and Shane Luke for Australia, while Bonz from the United States will line up with James Curley and Ramin, who finished sixth at the Nedbank SA Disabled Golf Open.SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

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Ohio Farm Bureau celebrates where it all began 100 years later

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Monday, Ohio Farm Bureau employees, members, and supporters came together to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the organization’s founding. On January 27th, 1919, prospective Farm Bureau members came together to form the organization. A century later, today’s Farm Bureau installed a plaque commemorating the organization in front of the very place it was founded.In this video, Ohio Farm Bureau President Frank Burkett talks the exciting time for OFBF, while Dr. Cathann Kress, dean of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at Ohio State, comments on life in agriculture down the years.Ohio Ag Net’s Joel Penhorwood has more.last_img read more

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2019 Ohio State Fair Junior Market Lamb Show results

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Grand Champion Market Lamb: Paige Pence, Clark Co. (Champion Hampshire)Res. Champion Market Lamb: Grant Johnson, Wayne Co. (Res. Champion Hampshire)Third overall: Paige Pence, Clark Co. (Champion Natural Colored)Fourth overall: Dalton Cunningham, Madison Co. (Champion Grade Lamb)Fifth overall: Erin Dilger-Lawrence, Licking Co. (Res. Champion Grade Lamb)   Champion Drive Champion Drive Judge Brian Reilly, Wisconsin, offers his final comments before selecting the champion. Champion drive Champion drive Paige Pence gets a victory hug. Grade Champion Drive Erin Dilger-Lawrence, Licking Co., had the Res. Champion Grade Lamb. Sidney Gossard watches the judge in the Grade Champion Drive. Dalton Cunningham from Madison County had the Grade Champion. Addilyn Bryant, 12, Ashland County, won her crossbred class. Bailee Amstutz, 14, Union County, won her crossbred class. Madelyn Harrison, 17, Butler County, got fifth place in the Dorset class. Jordan Collom, 13, Clinton Co., had the champion Suffolk. Miley Shatto, Shelby County, shows her Southdown. Cale McCracken, Portage Co., 9, had the Reserve Champion White face cross. Ian Gehret, 17, Darke County, watches the judge with his Shropshire. Cale McCracken, Portage Co., 9, had the Reserve Champion White face cross. Cale McCracken, Portage Co., 9, had the Reserve Champion White face cross. Justin Howell, Knox Co., finished third in his Natural Color class. Seth Wasilewski, Richland County, circles the ring with his Natural Color market lamb. The Natural ColoredChampion was shown by Paige Pence, Clark Co. The Res. Champion Natural Color was shown by Caleb Stone, Miami Co. Photos by Zach Parrott2019 Ohio State Fair Junior Market Lamb ShowJuly 24, 2019Judge: Brian Reilly, Wisconsin HampshireChamp: Paige Pence, Clark Co.Res. Champ: Grant Johnson, Wayne Co. ShropshireChamp: Jada Shroyer, Logan Co.Res. Champ: Marshall Miller, Tuscarawas Co. SouthdownsChampion: Nora Jackson, Tuscarawas Co.Res. Champion: Elizabeth Shatto, Shelby Co. SuffolkChampion: Jordan Collom, Clinton Co.Res. Champion: Lindsey Overmeyer, Lucas Co. DorsetChampion: Addilyn Bryant, AshlandRes. Champion: Brynn Shearer, Wayne Co. OxfordChampion: Madison Shatto, Shelby Co.Res. Champion: Brynn Shearer, Wayne Co. AOBChampion: Jacob Roeth, Miami Co.Res. Champion: Margo Sturgis, Wayne Co. White face crossChampion: Elizabeth Shatto, Shelby Co.Res. Champion: Cale McCracken, Portage Co. Natural ColoredChampion: Paige Pence, Clark Co.Res. Champion: Caleb Stone, Miami Co. GradeChamp: Dalton Cunningham, Madison Co.Res. Champ: Erin Dilger-Lawrence, Licking Co.last_img read more

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“Pirate’s Booty/Bonaire” GC19NBJ GEOCACHE OF THE WEEK – October 24, 2011

first_img SharePrint Related View near cache locationThe Caribbean island geocache, “Pirate’s Booty/Bonaire” (GC19NBJ) delivers spectacular views, petroglyphs, and hidden caves. But it’ll take you a four-wheel drive car or the four sturdy hooves of a donkey to reach this remote location.Cache owner FOOFY hid the difficulty 3.5, terrain 3.5 geocache in 2008. The cache page encourages geocachers to be prepared for a pirate adventure, “This geocache is now available for you to seek, find, and pillage. I suggest that you equip yourself with proper gear including sturdy footwear, a hat, plenty of water, a map, a GPS and a camera.” More than 70 geocachers have logged smileys, and the cache has accumulated nine Favorite Points so far.Some adventurers who logged the cache say this is why they started the GPS powered treasure-hunt called geocaching, “Very good cache, this is exactly what geocaching is about – a cache in a great location, that visitors wouldn’t usually know about, combined with a good hike, and a great container as the reward. Overall a top cache, thanks.”PetroglyphsCave’s near cache locationContinue your exploration of some of the most engaging geocaches from around the globe. Explore all the Geocaches of the Week on the Latitude 47 blog or view the Bookmark List on Geocaching.com. If you’ d like to nominate a Geocache of the Week send an email with your name, comments, the name of the geocache and the GC code to [email protected] with your Friends:Morelast_img read more

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Number of Employed, Very Educated Single women (EVES) on the rise in Urban India

first_imgUrban WomanUntil not so long ago, there was always the ‘right’ age to get married, and a ‘right’ sequence of priorities, which dictated that a woman’s place was with her family. But today, an increasing number of working women are defying this typecasting. Meet the EVES-the Employed, Very Educated Single,Urban WomanUntil not so long ago, there was always the ‘right’ age to get married, and a ‘right’ sequence of priorities, which dictated that a woman’s place was with her family. But today, an increasing number of working women are defying this typecasting. Meet the EVES-the Employed, Very Educated Single women. These are professionals who are putting off marriage to pursue career ambitions. Armed with a degree, they are ‘work gypsies’ by choice and follow promising job opportunities to new cities where they set up home. It is the final step towards real independence- a life where they are their own chief wage earners as well as moral guardians.Severing the umbilical cord with their parental home is forcing EVES to come into their own as decision-makers. While the average working woman continues to consult parents or husband for big buys, they are the sole decision-makers even for traditionally male-domain purchases like cars and electronics. Most manage their own investments and are fairly savvy about different financial products. This comfort with money is a far cry from the average finance-shy woman. Having said this, many EVES tend to be living a footloose bachelor existence and spending on themselves comes more easily than saving for later.As EVES settle into life away from family, workplace relationships assume greater importance, and relationships with same-age peers in particular become more complex and intimate.India Consumer Trend 06-0745% of the monthly salary of the average woman between 21 and 25 is spent on eating out, buying clothes and on watching movies.13% of the supposedly finance-shy single working woman’s wallet is spent on financial services, only one per cent behind her male counterparts.On one hand, there is an underlying desire to outshine. But at another level, they are the source of companionship in a strange city and many EVES confess to carrying personal troubles to office. In fact, emotional dependence on friends is so high, that in an emergency it is often friends who are contacted even before local relatives.For most working women, family and friends are a strong support system. But EVES must combat the same stress by themselves and also handle the pressures of running an independent household, which translates into a higher need for entertainment and relaxation. This shows itself in high spends on food, music, movies and entertainment electronics. But at a deeper level, this also becomes a search for ‘fun’ in whatever they do; from places where they shop, to programmes they watch, to clothes they wear.Most EVES discard feminine mannerisms in favour of a more androgynous personality. This comes on one hand, from doing many ‘man’s jobs’-from changing flat tyres to changing gas cylinders-that come with staying alone. Equally, it grows out of the need to manage men, be it office colleagues or the local plumber. EVES learn to underplay vulnerabilities and project an assertive, genderneutral manner; some even pick up strong language to project a tough personality, while others cultivate traditionally male-domain interests like sports and automobiles.With no one to question them on anything from how late they come home, to who they hang out with, to what they are spending on, EVEs enjoy more freedom to extend the cultural permissions available to them. And while most wouldn’t carry this into things that go diametrically against their upbringing, many use this opportunity to experiment with new lifestyles. This can take the form of finding new hangouts and eateries, trying new cuisines or, even new hobbies and adventure sports. Often this becomes a quest for self-transformation, and many EVES experiment frequently with their looks and wardrobe after branching off on their own.For most EVES, this gypsy existence is a passing phase, to be relinquished one day in favour of the stability of marriage. But their brush with independence and financial empowerment leaves a taste of freedom, which may well become a trait of the working woman of tomorrow. The writer is Consumer Trends Director, Leo Burnett India.advertisementlast_img read more

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