Guaranty Trust Bank Plc (GUARAN.ng) 2013 Presentation

first_imgGuaranty Trust Bank Plc (GUARAN.ng) listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange under the Banking sector has released it’s 2013 presentation For more information about Guaranty Trust Bank Plc (GUARAN.ng) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Guaranty Trust Bank Plc (GUARAN.ng) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Guaranty Trust Bank Plc (GUARAN.ng)  2013 presentation Company ProfileGuaranty Trust Bank Plc (GTBank) is a leading financial services institution in Nigeria with business operations in Cote D’Ivoire, Gambia, Ghana, Liberia, Kenya, Rwanda, Uganda, Sierra Leone, Tanzania and the United Kingdom. The company provides banking products and services for the retail, commercial and corporate banking sectors. GTBank has received numerous accolades in recognition of excellent service, delivery, innovation, corporate social responsibility and good corporate governance include ‘The Best Banking Group by World Finance Magazine’ and ‘The Most Innovative African Bank by The African Banker Magazine’ in 2016/2017. GTBank’s head office is in Lagos, Nigeria. Guaranty Trust Bank is listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchangelast_img read more

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TEXAS: Diocese approves transfer of hospital

first_img Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Belleville, IL Peter Salmon says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Collierville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Rev. Harriet B. Linville says: April 19, 2013 at 6:37 pm Will the employees have any changes in their personal health plans regarding contraception and abortion issues? Featured Events Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN Fr. Sidney Breese says: Rector Bath, NC April 24, 2013 at 7:15 pm Health insurance is a major expense for our small parish. I’ve thought for a long time that we could all save money if the national church established a nation-wide plan to cover all employees. I’ve been looking forward to the results of the decision to implement such a program in June. I understood that it was mandatory for all dioceses. How then can Texas take a different road? And how will that affect premiums for the rest of us? Les Singleton says: April 26, 2013 at 12:26 am This is an unsettling development and one wonders what will happen to our St. Luke’s in Kansas City, MO. The Episcopal Church has had a long standing presence in health care for many years. And this ministry has been appreciated by our society. The Diocese of Utah sold out some years ago and has used the monies to fund ministry in the diocese. Other dioceses have also sold out to other providers. It is very tempting when you have a very valuable asset, to sell it the the highest bidder. But I really think that we need to look at our priorities. Selling health care assets may seem like a way to raise funds for other ministries, but our presence in this ministry is different than other religious organizations. CHI has an agenda which is not in keeping with our values and in the end we will loose our control over those values. I would hope and pray that the diocese and Bishop would rethink this decision and come to a more compassionate and value driven decision. I realize that billions of dollars are at stake, but a peculiar moral compass in our society is also at stake. Comments are closed. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH By EDOT staff Posted Apr 19, 2013 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate Diocese of Nebraska New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ TEXAS: Diocese approves transfer of hospital $1 billion health foundation to be established The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Job Listing TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab center_img Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Albany, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Tags The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Grace Burson says: [Diocese of Texas] The Episcopal Diocese of Texas approved today a definitive agreement for the transfer of St. Luke’s Episcopal Health System to Catholic Health Initiatives, a nationally recognized health care system.As part of the transfer of St. Luke’s, CHI will contribute more than $1 billion to create a new Episcopal Health Foundation, which will focus on the unmet health needs of the area’s underserved population.  In addition, CHI has committed an additional $1 billion for future investment in the health system. The Rt. Rev. C. Andrew Doyle, bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Texas, said in announcing the decision, “We are humbled to be able to preserve the legacy of St. Luke’s, while also expanding the Diocesan commitment to health care.”The name of the system will be the St. Luke’s Health System.  The transaction is expected to be completed early this summer, subject to obtaining required regulatory approvals. The agreement includes the entire Health System: the Texas Medical Center campus, as well as suburban hospital locations in The Woodlands, Sugar Land, Pasadena and The Vintage.  CHI has committed to maintain all current physician models and all employees will continue to be employed by St. Luke’s.  In addition, CHI will continue to grow and enhance St. Luke’s significant affiliations with Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Heart® Institute, Kelsey-Seybold Clinic, Texas Children’s Hospital and MD Anderson Cancer Center.The 11-month evaluation process undertaken by the St. Luke’s Episcopal Health System Board included 30 prospective local and national partners with multiple strategic alternatives and, in March, this list was narrowed to three well-qualified finalists.   “We are enormously grateful to all participants for their earnest and forthright effort throughout this process,” said The Rt. Rev. Dena A. Harrison, bishop suffragan and chair of the St. Luke’s Episcopal Health System Board.CHI became the choice because it brings many benefits to the community:CHI operates across the continuum of care that is so key to the new model in American health care delivery.CHI brings cultural compatibility with the St. Luke’s brand of Faithful, Loving Care®.CHI values the people who made St. Luke’s what it is today: our patients, our physicians, our employees, our affiliates, our management, our donors and our Board leadership.“The relationship with Catholic Health Initiatives ensures the Greater Houston area will retain one of its great healthcare institutions, while best preparing St. Luke’s to meet future changes in healthcare,” said Kevin Lofton, CHI president and CEO.While this decision means the Episcopal Diocese of Texas will no longer provide acute care, the Diocese remains committed to its health care mission through the new Episcopal Health Foundation.“This new foundation will address a widening gap in healthcare throughout our 57-county area,” Doyle said.  “There is a care vacuum that must be addressed, including access to health care, prevention, community and environmental health, poverty, education and health disparities,” he said, adding, “This direction reflects the initial vision of Bishops Quin and Hines in founding St. Luke’s.  They called upon ‘all the mountain-moving powers of faith and prayer and human skill which can be brought to bear on individuals in need.’” Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release April 20, 2013 at 1:20 am my question also. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Comments (6) Health & Healthcare Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC April 22, 2013 at 2:48 pm A very sad day. There is no doubt that this a blow to the rights of women who are employees and who are patients. The Very Rev. Stuart Schadt says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA April 23, 2013 at 9:33 am My thoughts exactly. Press Release Service Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Youth Minister Lorton, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, MElast_img read more

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Pakistan: Open-air services bring healing to Peshawar Christians

first_imgPakistan: Open-air services bring healing to Peshawar Christians Submit a Job Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Albany, NY Comments (1) Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit an Event Listing Featured Jobs & Calls Press Release Service Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Tampa, FL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Comments are closed. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI September 11, 2013 at 2:32 pm Good story ! To God be the glory! Posted Sep 3, 2013 Rector Hopkinsville, KY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Bath, NC Rector Belleville, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Press Release Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Asia Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Collierville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Events The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Anglican Communion, Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC [Diocese of Peshawar’s The Frontier News] The healing ministry of the Diocese of Peshawar in Pakistan organized an open-air two-day healing services program at St. John’s Cathedral Church lawn at the end of August.These healing services were jointly organized by the Rev. Samson Anwar, who is in charge of the diocese’s healing ministry, and Pastor Anwar Fazal from Isaac TV, Lahore.The basic theme of the program was taken from the parable of the courageous woman, a widow who kept on seeking justice from an unjust judge. Eventually her resistance against injustice, her hope, and waiting meant she was rewarded with justice (Luke 18:1-8).The priests during the healing services encouraged people to keep on praying continuously, saying, “Jesus assures his followers that God will do justice in the end.”Hundreds of people attended the services; large crowds of the faithful came from all over the province to hear the word of God.A good number of non-Christians were there as well, seeking His blessings and were looking forward to receive healings, and to witness the miracles in the Holy name of Jesus Christ.Anwar and Fazal, along with other priests of the Peshawar diocese, prayed constantly for the sick, disabled, and for people possessed with demons and evil spirits. Religious songs and hymns were sung with great conviction and commitment. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Tags Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Fr. Michael Neal says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GAlast_img read more

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At Georgetown forum, Episcopal leaders discuss religious groups’ role in…

first_img Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME By Egan MillardPosted Sep 6, 2019 Rector Martinsville, VA Rebecca Linder Blachly, director of The Episcopal Church’s Office of Government Relations, speaks at the “Two Possible Futures: Faith Action to End AIDS” forum at Georgetown University’s Berkley Center for Religion, Peace & World Affairs in Washington on Sept. 4, 2019. Photo: Egan Millard/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Washington, D.C.] At a forum on the involvement of faith communities in the fight against HIV/AIDS, two leaders from The Episcopal Church spoke out about the significant obstacles that remain, despite decades of dramatic progress.Rebecca Linder Blachly, director of The Episcopal Church’s Office of Government Relations, and Jesse Milan Jr., president and CEO of AIDS United and a former president of the board of the National Episcopal AIDS Coalition, participated in a forum called “Two Possible Futures: Faith Action to End AIDS” at Georgetown University in Washington on Sept. 5.The two-part panel discussion, hosted by Georgetown’s Berkley Center for Religion, Peace & World Affairs, focused on the role of religious groups at a critical time in the effort to end HIV/AIDS. The global fight against the disease that has killed about 32 million people has made enormous progress since the 1990s, with AIDS-related deaths down more than 50 percent since the peak in 2004, and experts say ending the pandemic is now within reach. However, progress has slowed and infections are increasing in some regions, raising the possibility of a major resurgence in the 2020s.Religious groups, the panel members said, can make the difference between the two possible futures in the event’s title. By 2030, religious groups could come together and use their moral conviction and deeply engaged networks to end AIDS – or they could fail to do so, and the disease will continue to kill millions of people per year.In the first panel, titled “Looking Back,” participants discussed how religion helped and hurt the response to AIDS. Milan, who has been living with HIV since the 1980s, said that many churches have historically focused more on ministering to the dead and dying than on prevention.“The church has stepped up at times when someone was dead, but not when someone was at risk,” Milan said.Because of churches’ past work with AIDS as a terminal illness, Milan said, many religious leaders are not up to speed on recent innovations that address HIV as a sexual health issue.Milan identified several HIV-related factors which he believes churches failed to address: the agency of women around their sexual health, human rights issues for LGBTQ+ people and health disparities based solely on race.Milan also pointed out that, because there are “only so many seats at the table” in policy discussions about HIV, someone selected to represent “the faith community” may not be able to speak for the complex array of religious people. And there’s also the problem of decisions being made without the input of people living with HIV, he said.In the second half of the discussion, “Looking Ahead,” Blachly spoke about some of the most successful aspects of The Episcopal Church’s work to end AIDS. Partnerships with the World Council of Churches, the Anglican Communion, the United Nations and other groups have been very productive, she said. In the future, Blachly hopes to “overcome resistance to partnerships. We know partnerships work,” she told the panel.Blachly pointed to a generational gap as one of the new challenges in the continuing fight against the disease.“Young people don’t remember the AIDS crisis,” she said, a point echoed by Milan and others. And there’s a widespread sense that the problem of HIV has essentially been solved, which means it tends to be a lower priority than problems thought to be more pressing, like climate change and human trafficking.Another panelist, David Barstow, who wrote a book that imagines two possible trajectories in detail – ending AIDS or letting it come roaring back – said that his vision for the winning future includes a coalition of major religious leaders making a public appeal at the 23rd International AIDS Conference in San Francisco in July 2020.Who would he like to see there?“The pope, the Dalai Lama, Desmond Tutu, Michael Curry,” Barstow said. “The big ones, down the list.”Panelists were divided on which future they think is more likely, but Blachly was firmly in the optimistic camp, pointing to “historic bipartisan support” in Congress recently.“We have the tools to do it if we have the political will and support,” she said.– Egan Millard is an assistant editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab HIV/AIDS Tags Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Collierville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Albany, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit an Event Listing Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Belleville, IL Rector Bath, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Press Release Service Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Featured Events Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK At Georgetown forum, Episcopal leaders discuss religious groups’ role in ending AIDS The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KYlast_img read more

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Can you ever catch up on sleep?

first_imgShare on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. From Florida Hospital Apopka Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Please enter your comment! TAGSFlorida Hospital – Apopka Previous articleIn case you missed it: The Apopka news week in reviewNext articleFree admission days coming to Bok Tower Gardens Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replycenter_img Have you ever stayed up late a few nights and thought you could catch up on lost sleep over the weekend? Well, depending on what study you read, you really can’t catch up. We checked in with Karen Baker, MD, sleep medicine specialist at Florida Hospital, to get the scoop.What can you do if you’re not getting enough ZZZs and what’s the toll on your body?Chronic partial sleep deprivation does take a big toll on our bodies. It can impair your reaction time. It’s equivalent to being under the influence of alcohol. We’re talking about getting two hours less than normal every night, so chronically this can impair you significantly when it comes to reaction time, judgment and alertness. And, micro sleep, unfortunately, no, you cannot make up for it over the weekend.The average recommended amount of sleep for adults is 8 hours, but not everyone follows the textbook. Some people are fine on 7 and some need 9 to function normally.If you’re chronically sleep deprived, it can cause daytime sleepiness and microsleeps where you have a brief moment of drowsiness at a stoplight, for example. Also, you’ll have lapses in attention and alertness and the lack of sleep can negatively impact your mood.Is early to bed, early to rise important?Generally, it’s ideal but there are people who are more night owls and some are early birds.What are the long-term side effects? Heart issues, metabolism, diabetes, memory loss?Certainly, sleep deprivation can lead to sleep apnea. If your sleep is minimal or fragmented it can negatively impact glucose control, can contribute to poor food choices and blood pressure can be impacted.When your sleep is interrupted, you have increases in blood pressure.Lack of sleep can have an impact on cortisol levels and sugar levels. In terms of memory, it does impact memory but wouldn’t cause dementia. When you learn things, you normally encode those memories in your brain when you sleep. When sleep is impacted it impairs the retention of information. When someone has very severe sleep apnea, it can lead to confusion.So, yes, it does impact memory to some degree.What can you do if you’re sleep deprived?I always start with having good sleep hygiene. However, here are a few additional tips.Have a very consistent sleep schedule seven days a week. The mistake people make is they vary their sleep schedules a lot. I suggest not varying it by more than an hour. If you want to sleep in a bit, just sleep in an hour.Have a consistent bedtime routine. Don’t use electronics just before going to bed. Dim the lights and have a nice relaxing activity that’s the same every night like reading a book for a few minutes or praying. If you find you’re lying in bed awake for a significant amount of time generally it’s best to get up, do a quiet, boring activity and return to bed when drowsy.Avoid any vigorous activity before bed.Keep it cool and dark. I generally recommend taking a shower before bed. With your drop in body temperature, it helps the circadian rhythm.Avoid daytime napping, especially in later afternoon or evening.What about teens?Starting at 11 or 12 years old and up to age 19 they still generally need nine hours of sleep. The average teen barely gets seven hours of sleep. It’s common that they go to bed late and wake up early for school. They’re chronically sleep deprived. And, like I said before, catching up on the weekend never works. You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Please enter your name here The Anatomy of Fear last_img read more

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Christian Aid fundraises online tax-efficiently

Christian Aid fundraises online tax-efficiently Howard Lake | 23 May 2000 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  20 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis For a simply and effective example of a UK charity seeking online donations in line with the new Gift Aid rules, visit Christian Aid. The key text they use, with an opt-in box, is “I am a UK taxpayer and want Christian Aid to claim back the tax on my gift. My tax bill this year will be more than this gift.” About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. read more

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Fraudulent election in Haiti

first_imgThe Provisional Electoral Council (CEP) of Haiti announced the results of the Oct. 25 presidential elections on Nov. 5. The most significant figure reported was the level of participation: only 26 percent of registered voters went to the polls.Almost every party of the 54 participating in these elections — with the exception of the winner — rejected the results as being based on deliberate fraud, miscounts and ballot stuffing.According to the CEP’s rounded results, Jovenèl Moïse, of President Michel Martelly’s ruling PHTK, came in first with 33 percent.Jude Célestin, of LAPEH, came in second with 25 percent. He also came in second in the 2010 vote, but was de-selected by then Secretary of State Hillary Clinton in favor of Martelly.Moïse Jean-Charles, of Pitit Dessalines, came in third with 14 percent, and Maryse Narcisse of the Lavalas Family (FL) came in fourth with 7 percent.Narcisse’s lawyer, Gervais Charles, told the Miami Herald that Lavalas was “contesting the credibility of the process,” but we “know who we are going before to plead our case, the same people who are at the base of all the violations.” The FL, led by Narcisse, has held demonstrations of thousands through the streets of Port-au-Prince, demanding that the CEP recount the ballots, according to videos posted on her Facebook page.Pitit Dessalines, according to its Facebook page, held a major nighttime demonstration in Cap-Haitien, challenging the vote count. Moïse Jean-Charles declared Nov. 9 that he and his party were launching “a juridical-political battle” against the results, and said, “We cannot let them trample the vote.” (­Haïti-Liberté, Nov. 11-17)A series of protests, meetings, declarations and press conferences have been held throughout Haiti. Many say, according to Haïti-Liberté, that the CEP was harkening back “to the period of official elections by dictatorial regimes” where the “vote settled nothing.” The cops have been picking up discarded tires off the streets to keep protesters from setting them on fire in burning barricades.In Haitian overseas communities, there has been a call to condemn and protest the electoral fraud. The Boston branch of FL protested before the Haitian Consulate there on Nov. 13.Some left political parties, like the Coordination Dessalines (KOD), boycotted the elections, saying they could not be fair under military occupation by the U.N. occupation forces in Haiti, called Minustah. KOD and other groups called the CEP’s count an electoral coup d’état.Minustah and the U.S. roleMinustah’s flickr account showed pictures of its forces unloading pallets of ballots with forklifts from a large cargo plane. They put the ballots into trucks and then provided an armed escort to polling sites, where they were turned over to election workers. There are also pictures of heavily armed Minustah troops patrolling popular neighborhoods.The U.S. government acknowledged spending $30 million on the Oct. 25 Haitian election.Minustah was originally set up in 2004 to replace U.S., French, Canadian and Chilean troops that occupied Haiti after President Jean-Bertrand Aristide was kidnapped and sent to the Central African Republic on a U.S. Air Force plane.Minustah veils U.S. military domination of Haiti. When the command structure of Minustah was damaged by the 2010 earthquake, the Pentagon rushed in nearly 20,000 troops until its veil could be restored.Some media accounts report that the international community — meaning official U.S. opinion — is satisfied with the election because there was no violence. Yet cops stomped a protester to death. And someone assassinated Pitit Dessalines militant Maxo Gaspard in his party’s office. By their enormous abstention, the Haitian people showed just how dissatisfied they are.But the Haitian people have been fighting to preserve their independence for 211 years, and they are not going to let a bogus election derail their struggle.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Commentary: Farmers See The Glass As Half Empty

first_img Commentary: Farmers See The Glass As Half Empty SHARE SHARE Previous articleTechnical Government Shutdown in Effect, USDA Vows Core Programs to Remain OpenNext articleBower Trading Market Strategy Report: Don’t Panic Gary Truitt Farmers can be the most optimistic people in the world; they can also be the most pessimistic. In the short term, this mood swing can be driven by the weather, the market, or the win/loss record of their favorite college sports team. At the recent farm show in Fort Wayne, the mood of pessimism was almost palpable. Exhibitors reported that, while crowds were good, very few were interested in buying anything or even finalizing orders for the 2018 crop. There was also very little interest in discussing selling any of their 2017 production. The most popular booth at the show was the NAPA booth because they were giving away free 5 gallon plastic buckets. “Well you always need a another free bucket,” said the thousands who walked out of the show with the bright yellow buckets.This mood has been documented by Purdue in its monthly Ag Economic Barometer. This monthly survey measures the level of optimism farmers have about the farm economy. Ever since harvest, the barometer has been falling. “The decline has been driven entirely by producers adopting a more pessimistic perspective regarding the future,” said the Center for Commercial agriculture, which conducts the monthly survey. As recently as October, the Future Expectations index was at 137. The index fell to 127 in November, and, in December, dropped again to 120 – the lowest reading for the Index of Future Expectations since October 2016.A look back over the past 2 years reveals an interesting trend. Farmer optimism spiked right after the election of Donald Trump. Since then, optimism has been on the decline. Today more farmers feel their farms will be in worse economic shape a year from now. This is most likely related to the lack of progress we have seen in Washington on key issues including trade, immigration, and the Farm Bill. While there has been progress on reducing regulations and putting a muzzle on the EPA, no significant improvement has been seen in the prices or profit margins for most Midwestern row crop farmers.The winter extension outlook meetings that farmers attend have not been filled with optimism about prices and profits. Most economists are urging producers to sharpen the pencil and hunker down to ride out another year. So it is no wonder why farmers are in a bad mood.There are, however, a few things on the horizon that promise some improvement. First, the recently passed tax reform package will put some cash in your pocket — not only for farmers but also for consumers. This extra money will continue to stimulate the U.S. farm economy and help with improved demand. In addition, the economies of other countries around the world are also heating up which will likely lead to increased demand for food products from the U.S. While we have not seen it yet, many market forecasters are telling me that demand will pick up in 2018 and that we will make a good deal of progress in reducing the surplus that has been depressing prices.Finally, spring is coming soon. In less than 60 days, we will have the planters out and calibrated and will be waiting for some good weather to plant the 2018 crop. Nothing improves the attitude of a farmer like putting seed in the ground. In the meantime, let’s keep things in perspective, 2018 is going to be another tough year and we just have to find a way to work through it. Putting Donald Trump in the white House is not going to solve everything, and things will get better — it is just going to take longer than we want. Facebook Twitter By Gary Truitt – Jan 21, 2018 Facebook Twitter Home Commentary Commentary: Farmers See The Glass As Half Emptylast_img read more

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The Skiff: October 12, 2017

first_imgAndrew Van Heusdenhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/andrew-van-heusden/ Twitter Facebook + posts Andrew Van Heusdenhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/andrew-van-heusden/ Linkedin Andrew Van Heusden Welcome TCU Class of 2025 ReddIt Listen: Frogflix (Season 2): Episode 15 – Parts 1 & 2 A fox’s tail: the story of TCU’s campus foxes Life in Fort Worth Previous articleUPDATE: TCU alumna continues recovery after Las Vegas, family searches for her rescuersNext articleNo. 6 TCU is no longer an underdog Andrew Van Heusden RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORcenter_img Listen: Ball Don’t Lie: Parting Shots Listen: Frogflix (Season 2): Episode 14 Listen: Frogflix (Season 2): Episode 13 Facebook Andrew Van Heusdenhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/andrew-van-heusden/ Linkedin ReddIt Twitter Andrew Van Heusdenhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/andrew-van-heusden/ printFailed to fetch Error: URL to the PDF file must be on exactly the same domain as the current web page. Click here for more infoVolume 116, Issue 8: Guide to Fort WorthAlso: Clearfork opens new stores, fall festival guide, eight burger joints to try and more. Andrew Van Heusden is a senior journalism and film-television-digital media major from Brighton, Michigan. He is looking forward to being the digital producer this semester for TCU Student Media. He claims to live in Moudy South throughout the weekdays; but if you can’t find him there, then be sure to try the local movie theaters or the Amon G. Carter Stadium.last_img read more

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Students to vote on removing House seats for Honors College

first_imgBenton McDonaldhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/benton-mcdonald/ Linkedin Benton McDonald is a senior journalism and political science double major from Austin, Texas. He has worked for TCU360 since his freshman year and is currently the executive editor. Facebook Board approves tuition freeze, RRI actions but doesn’t act on eligibility issue spurred by Williams Milton Daniel Hall. (Heesoo Yang/Staff Photographer) + posts Benton McDonaldhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/benton-mcdonald/ printThe Student Government Association (SGA) referendum to eliminate House seats for the John V. Roach Honors College will be voted on by the student body tomorrow. The legislation was passed by the House of Representatives in February, but the student body vote was delayed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The bill was co-sponsored by Student Body Treasurer Paige Shiring and Representatives Austin Shively and Zane Champie. Shiring said they examined the composition of House seats and noticed the Honors College was being overrepresented in comparison to other constituencies. “Having a truly equitable and representative body means representing people from all over campus and not triple representing a select number of students who are already really motivated; otherwise, they wouldn’t be in the Honors College,” she said. Under the current rule, students in the Honors College can choose to run as a representative for the Honors College, their academic college or their graduation class. Read More: SGA votes to hold referendum to eliminate House seats for Honors CollegeAll other students can only run as a representative for their academic college or graduation class. “Students within the honors college receive triple representation from their class, academic and honors representatives, whereas non-honors students only receive double representation,” according to February’s legislation. The Honors College is also the only co-curricular program that receives seating in the House.If SGA were to keep the program’s seats, Champie said they would have to start letting in other groups at TCU that aren’t under academic units. “It makes a lot more sense to take the one outlier out and have everyone be represented exactly the same than have one organization or one group of students that are getting represented two times,” Champie said. All three of the bill’s co-sponsors talked about removing this “third route into student government” as a way to make the House of Representatives more accessible for all students. “Making that accessibility uniform for every single student on this campus, that seemed like the most fair way to have a representative body.” Paige Shiring, co-sponsor of the billShiring added that all three sponsors are in the Honors College and could not think of a single issue for which the program specifically needed a representative. While the consensus of the students the sponsors spoke to seemed to be in favor of the change, confusion abounded about what exactly the referendum is. “The problem I was running into was that it required a good amount of explanation because no one really cares, no one really understands seat apportionment,” Shiring said. The easiest way Shively found to explain the referendum was to say that “you can’t major in honors,” so the program should not be apportioned seats in the House. The bill passed 33-15 in the House last spring, and Shively is hopeful the student body will agree. “I really think it’s going to come down to how many people we can have a conversation with or talk to or just get the information in front of them,” he said. All undergraduate students will receive a link to the official ballot in their TCU email Friday morning, and voting will be open from 9 a.m. to 11:59 p.m. Benton McDonald Previous articleStudents must request tickets for football seasonNext articleThe Skiff: Aug. 20, 2020 Benton McDonald RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter ReddIt Benton McDonaldhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/benton-mcdonald/ Benton McDonaldhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/benton-mcdonald/ Facebook ReddIt Thousands of TCU community members receive COVID-19 vaccines as university supply increases Twitter Settlement reached between TCU, former professor in discrimination lawsuit Chancellor talks stimulus money, COVID-19 vaccines and more at limited attendance faculty town hall Linkedin World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history Welcome TCU Class of 2025last_img read more

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