Cambridge University launches foundation year program for disadvantaged students

first_imgProfessor Graham Virgo, Senior Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Education at The University of Cambridge, said:  Some of the groups that the Foundation Year aims to reach include “those who have been in care, those estranged from their families, and those who have missed significant periods of learning because of health issues. […] Other possible candidates include students who have been unable to access suitable qualifications, those from low income backgrounds, and those from schools which send few students to university.” Overall, the program will aim to support those who have faced disrupted education, and would be unable to make a successful application through the standard admissions process. The Foundation Year will be free for students, who will have one-year scholarships funded by a £5 million gift from the philanthropists Christina and Peter Dawson, money which is also being used to launch the program.  Currently Lady Margaret Hall is the only Oxford college to offer a foundation year, which it launched in 2016. They offer admission to 9 subjects with offers ranging from AAB-BBB, including STEM, Social Sciences, and Humanities courses. The University of Oxford is currently in the process of developing a university-wide program.  Cambridge University has announced a new foundation year program for students from disadvantaged backgrounds. The program has 50 places available across 13 pilot colleges, and will have an offer of BBB rather than the university’s standard A*AA.  The foundation program will be assessed with a CertHE certificate, which is equivalent to the first year of a Bachelor’s degree. Students that fail to attain the certificate, or wish to apply to other universities, will be supported by the program in doing so. The University states that they anticipate that more subjects could be added in the future, including STEM subjects. center_img Rather than focusing on a specific subject, students will participate in “an engaging and challenging multi-disciplinary curriculum in the Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences that will prepare them for further study in these subjects.” Students that successfully complete the program will be able to progress to these subjects at Cambridge without needing to re-apply.  “Cambridge is committed to further diversifying its student body and welcoming all those who have the ability to achieve here, regardless of background.” “The University’s work to explore new ways of widening access and closing the attainment gap caused by inequality is absolutely vital at a time when those the Foundation Year is aimed at – who already face exceptional disadvantage – are likely to have felt the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic disproportionately.” Alan Rusbridger, Principal at Lady Margaret Hall, has been contacted for comment.last_img read more

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Ocean City Arts Center Begins 50th Year With Exhibit of 3 Generations

first_imgLance Balderson’s acrylic painting “Boatscapes”Well-known painter Lance Balderson joins his daughter, Jody Balderson Wiker, a printmaker, and granddaughter, Maddelinde Wiker, a sculptor, at the Ocean City Arts Center Jan. 5 through Jan. 31.The exhibit is named “Layers — Three Generations,” because the family of artists uses layers in producing paintings, prints and three-dimensional art.“January 2015 marks the 50th anniversary of the Ocean City Arts Center,” Executive Director Rosalyn Lifshin said. “We are so pleased to present an exhibit by such a talented family including Lance Balderson, who has been a member of the Ocean City Arts Center for decades. He and his daughter have won ‘Best of Show’ at the Boardwalk Art Show and have taught at the Arts Center.”A “Meet the Artists” reception will be held, free and open to the public, 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 9. Light refreshments will be served.Balderson, a native of suburban Philadelphia and a resident of Ocean View (Dennis Township), is known for his colorful abstract work.Philadelphia philanthropist Gerald Lenfest purchased a painting for the Philadelphia Museum of Art’s permanent collection. Until it is included at the museum, the work hangs in Mr. Lenfest’s Philadelphia residence. Balderson’s paintings are also included in more than 10 other permanent collections including those of the Woodmere Art Museum, Philadelphia; Columbia University, School of Law, New York; Wesley College, Delaware; and more.A graduate of Pennsylvania State University’s School of Architecture, Balderson has referenced his career as an architect using layers of color and simple shapes to create abstract art. More recently, Balderson has featured landscapes and other forms of nature in his acrylic paintings.Jody Balderson Wiker is a resident of Medford Lakes and also a graduate of Pennsylvania State University with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in printmaking. Ms. Wiker creates collagraphs, which combine aspects of painting and collage in a process of building the plate using various techniques and materials.Her work begins with a photograph she has taken, which is generally inspired by shapes in nature. From there, Jody looks at the positive and negative spaces as well as the weight of an edge to create her images.“As a young person and having a father as an artist, I would often watch him teach, attended numerous art shows, and occasionally would help him prepare his paintings,” Wiker said. “I always knew I wanted to be an artist, and when I took a printmaking class in college, and started making collagraphs, I discovered my art medium”.Maddelinde (Maddey) Wiker, the third generation to attend Pennsylvania State University, is a sophomore working toward a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in sculpture. Maddelinde uses many materials, often recyled, to influence her sculptures. She starts with a concept and allows the material to shape the ultimate outcome of each piece. Maddey grew up with the influence of her “pop-pop” attending arts shows and visiting art museums. She also attended classes at her mother’s art school, “The Art Studio.”Balderson and daughter Jody both teach art. They have won numerous “Best of Show” awards throughout New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Colorado and Maryland. Maddelinde has won awards in New Jersey and at the Philadelphia Flower Show in the Youth Gardens Pressed Flowers Division.For further information, call (609) 399-7628 or visit www.oceancityartscenter.org.The Ocean City Arts Center, located at 1735 Simpson Avenue, is open 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday.— News release from the Ocean City Arts Centerlast_img read more

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Dreamers Delight Brings City Sounds To Newest Single “Brooklyn” [Premiere]

first_imgReed Krafft has quickly risen through the ranks of the modern electronic music scene with his beautiful brainchild, Dreamers Delight. Gearing up to drop his sophomore EP after an exciting year of playing Coachella, and several sold-out shows with Big Gigantic and French Kiwi Juice, the Santa-Barbara based producer combines the cultural influence from his worldly travels with his passion for soulful, intelligently produced melodies into a world of spacey, yet concentrated, goodness.“Brooklyn” is the first single off Lucid Anatomy, which drops November 11th on Lowtemp, and stems from a culmination of experience through travel and music, with the inspiration for the track coming from Krafft’s recent trips to New York. “I was walking around Brooklyn a few months back with my field recorder and captured some really unique and interesting sounds resonating from the ambiance that carries throughout the city,” says Krafft. “I added a lot of those samples to this track, which I think help give it that New York / Brooklyn feel.” Listen to the first track off Dreamers Delight’s upcoming album below, exclusively here:Catch Dreamers Delight for his album release celebration with Lettuce and The Floozies at The PlayStation Theatre on November 12th amidst the rest of his Fall tour.NOVEMBER TOUR DATES11.4 // Santa Barbara, CA – EOS Lounge w/ Manic Focus + Thriftworks11.5 // Los Angeles, CA – The Roxy Theatre w/ Manic Focus + Thriftworks11.12 // New York, NY – The Playstation Theater w/ Lettuce + The Floozies11.25 // Denver, CO – Cervantes’ Masterpiece Ballroom w/ Bass Physicslast_img read more

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Dick Vitale and wife donate $1 million for student scholarships

first_imgESPN college basketball analyst Dick Vitale and his wife, Lorraine, donated $1 million to Notre Dame, the University announced in late September. Their gift will fund the creation of the Dick Vitale Family Spirit Scholarship.Although neither Dick Vitale nor his wife attended the University, Vitale said they both have strong ties to Notre Dame.“I formed a connection to Notre Dame because both of my daughters, Terri and Sherri, became students at Notre Dame in the mid-90s and loved the school so much that they became ‘Double Domers,’” Vitale said. “Notre Dame runs deep in our family.”The scholarship fund is geared towards undergraduate students who have demonstrated need, and preference is given to those who are members of spirit groups on campus such as the marching band, Irish Guard, Irish Dance Team and the cheerleading squad.“I love the University — I love everything it stands for,” Vitale said. “I believe in Notre Dame’s quality of education. The young people that go there put together such an incredible résumé to be able to be admitted to the University, and I just wanted to maybe be able to bring a little happiness to some youngster who needed financial help.”The focus on athletic spirit groups stems from Vitale’s long-time involvement in collegiate athletics. Vitale graduated from Seton Hall University in 1963 and received his master’s degree in education from William Paterson University. He coached basketball at the University of Detroit from 1973-1977 and went on to be head coach of the Detroit Pistons in 1978. Vitale said both of his daughters were also involved in athletics during their time at Notre Dame.“They played tennis on the varsity tennis team and were scholarship athletes and married two guys that were also students at Notre Dame,” Vitale said. Vitale said his connection to Notre Dame remains among his few favorites, despite the ties he has created to many other universities and colleges throughout his career.“I am very proud that I received an honorary alumni degree in 1997 and have been very active speaking at the pep rallies and on the campus on a regular basis as much as I can,” Vitale said. “It is everything about people who really, really want to make something of their lives, who have really put together a dedicated plan to the game of life and are really dedicated to pursuing their dreams to the best of their abilities.”Vitale said his hope is that this scholarship fund will allow students to accomplish great things in both athletics and in spirit activities, just as Vitale has been able to do himself.“I have been blessed in my life financially and in many ways,” he said. “I just love giving back. Notre Dame represents all that’s good about an education. I hope that these students go on to chase their dreams and goals and pursue them to the best of their ability and be able to, later in life, do the same for someone else — to be able to give back”Tags: Dick Vitale, donation, scholarshiplast_img read more

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Revolution in the Elbow, Starring Kate Shindle, Cady Huffman & More, Opens Off-B’way

first_imgSome shows take place in New York. Some shows take place in a fantasy land. Some shows, like Revolution in the Elbow of Ragnar Agnarsson Furniture Painter, take place in a body part. The world premiere of the new musical, which stars Tony winner Cady Huffman and Broadway fave Kate Shindle, opens officially on August 13 at off-Broadway’s Minetta Lane Theatre. The show features a book, music and lyrics by Ívar Páll Jónsson. Directed by Bergur Ingólfsson and based on a story by Ívar and Gunnlaugur Jónsson, the emotionally charged rock love story explores a love triangle set in Elbowville, a small community within Ragnar Agnarsson’s body. Elbowville mayor Manuela (Huffman) must deal with a crisis when a “prosperity machine” compromises the peace of the sweet little community. Related Shows In addition to Huffman and Shindle, the tuner features Michael Biren, Patrick Boll, Zach Cossman, Karli Dinardo, Rick Faugno, Danielle Kelsey, Graydon Long, Brad Nacht, Marrick Smith and Jesse Wildman. Show Closed This production ended its run on Sept. 20, 2014 Revolution in the Elbow of Ragnar Agnarsson Furniture Painter View Commentslast_img read more

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Draft EU energy plan calls for 60GW of offshore wind capacity by 2030

first_imgDraft EU energy plan calls for 60GW of offshore wind capacity by 2030 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Reuters:The European Union is considering a plan to increase its offshore wind energy capacity five-fold this decade and 25-fold by 2050, as it seeks to become climate neutral by mid-century, according to a draft policy.The 27-nation EU, which is already home to 42% of the world’s offshore wind capacity, says the technology now produces clean power at a lower price than any fossil fuel-based source.A draft of the European Commission’s strategy for offshore renewable energy, seen by Reuters and due to be published on Nov. 18, says the bloc should aim for 60 gigawatts (GW) of offshore wind by 2030 and 300GW by 2050. Its current capacity is 12GW.The draft also includes a goal of 60GW of wave and tidal energy by 2050.Meeting the goals would require 789 billion euros ($937.10 billion) in investment and a revamp of countries’ current policies, which would see only 90GW of offshore renewables deployed by 2050.“Offshore wind is cheap but requires huge upfront investment,” said Giles Dickson, CEO of industry group WindEurope, pointing to the need for policies that ensure projects have stable income. The draft says guarantees or power purchase agreements could achieve this, while the EU’s 750-billion-euro coronavirus economic recovery fund could support new projects.[Kate Abnett and Susanna Twidale]More: EU eyes huge increase in offshore wind energy to meet climate goals: draftlast_img read more

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Centereach Man Charged With Fatal Stabbing

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A suspect was arrested early Thursday morning for stabbing a 20-year-old man to death outside a restaurant in Centereach earlier this month, Suffolk County police said.Elvin Guzman, 21, was charged with second-degree murder in the death of Dennis Miranda Leon. Both the suspect and the victim are from Centereach.Police said the suspect stabbed Leon during an altercation in the rear of El Rio Restaurant on Middle Country Road shortly after midnight on Saturday, Apr. 15.The victim was taken to Stony Brook University Hospital, where he died five days later.Guzman will be arraigned Thursday at First District Court in Central Islip.last_img read more

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Compliance: Highlights from CUNA/NASCUS BSA Conference

first_img 14SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr More than 300 credit union compliance professionals from 237 credit unions and more than 20 associations attended last week’s CUNA/National Association of State Credit Union Supervisors Bank Secrecy Act Conference in Las Vegas.Over four days, attendees got the latest information on BSA compliance from regulators, attorneys and other compliance professionals, covering everything from money services businesses (MSBs) to international anti-money laundering trends.See below for highlights of the conference.MondayAttorney David Reed discussed how keeping up with BSA requires a “culture of compliance” and that, “the business side of the organization needs to support anti-money laundering controls” and a credit union’s commitment and responsibility toward BSA compliance should be “clearly visible;” continue reading »last_img read more

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Is Snowden Vindicated by USA Freedom Act Vote?

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York He was vilified, crucified, deemed a traitor by some and a spy by others, and charged under the Espionage Act, forcing him to seek refuge in Vladimir Putin’s Russia—yet many of the same lawmakers who lambasted National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden have voted in favor of curtailing the dragnet surveillance program he helped to expose.Even Snowden’s harshest critics must appreciate the irony.On Tuesday, the US Senate, after often contentious debate over the so-called USA Freedom Act, which sought to amend Section 215 of the Patriot Act that was hastily passed days after the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks, approved the measure 67-32—more than two weeks after it overwhelmingly passed the House, and one day after the program expired—essentially marking the first time in 14 years that Americans’ phone calls weren’t being gobbled up by the NSA.The bill was almost immediately signed into law by President Obama late Tuesday after what he said was a “needless delay and inexcusable lapse in important national security authorities.”Under the new law, the government will no longer be in the business of collecting and storing Americans’ phone call data. That job will be left to the phone companies, but it will take six months for the change to occur. Now, US authorities must get a court order to gain access to such data—phone numbers, phone call length, and in some cases, the caller’s location. The law also forces the secret Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) courts to declassify disputed decisions and creates an advocate that would argue privacy concerns before the court.The bill inspired political theatrics that only Washington could produce.  The Senate was forced to remain in Washington over the weekend amid disagreements between national security hawks and privacy proponents. Defying the wishes of majority leader Sen. Mitch McConnell, a fellow Kentucky Republican, Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY), a Republican presidential candidate, single-handily caused the original law to expire at midnight Monday. Unlikely alliances were forged as the bill’s supporters tried to push it across the goal line. House Republicans had told their Senate colleagues that any changes to the bill they’d previously  passed would be rejected.Long Island’s entire Congressional delegation voted in favor of the bill, including Rep. Peter King (R-Seaford), a staunch defender of the NSA and one of Snowden’s biggest critics.“It was the strongest NSA legislation that can pass the House,” King said in a statement when the House bill had passed. “Also, as a practical matter, the NSA should still be at least 90-percent as effective under the Freedom Act as it is under current law.”The law’s final approval prompted cheers from groups fighting for privacy.“The passage of the USA Freedom Act is a milestone,” Jameel Jaffer, American Civil Liberties Union deputy legal director, said in a statement. “This is the most important surveillance reform bill since 1978, and its passage is an indication that Americans are no longer willing to give the intelligence agencies a blank check.”Edward Snowden appearing in an NBC News interview. (Photo credit: NBC)Despite the historic vote, Jaffer noted that the fight for privacy isn’t over.“The passage of this bill is an indication that comprehensive reform is possible, but it is not comprehensive reform in itself,” he added. “Over the next weeks and months, lawmakers must tackle the larger project of bringing the government’s surveillance practices back in line with democratic values.”Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore) echoed Jaffer’s sentiment. The bill’s passage comes almost exactly two years to the day that journalists Glenn Greenwald, then with the Guardian, and Laura Poitras, embarked on a cloak-and-dagger journey to China for a meeting with an unidentified source who had privately produced scores of documents to Poitras revealing massive US government surveillance at home and abroad.Since then, dozens of articles have been published from news organizations across the globe using documents disclosed by Snowden, a former NSA contractor.Some of Snowden’s supporters suggested that Tuesday’s vote vindicated him.King, despite his vote, doesn’t see it that way, according to a blistering Tweet he sent out Tuesday: Passage of USA Freedom is the most significant victory for Americans’ privacy rights in more than a decade— Ron Wyden (@RonWyden) June 2, 2015center_img The bill’s passage also comes weeks after the US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit ruled that bulk collection under the NSA’s metadata program is not authorized by Section 215 of the Patriot Act. The court ruled that the program exceeded the scope of Congress’ authorization.Yet, advocates say, more needs to be done to limit what they deem unwarranted government intrusion into the lives of innocent Americans.“It’s a testament to the significance of the Snowden disclosures and also to the hard work of many principled legislators on both sides of the aisle,” Jaffer said in his statement. “Still, no one should mistake this bill for comprehensive reform. The bill leaves many of the government’s most intrusive and overbroad surveillance powers untouched, and it makes only very modest adjustments to disclosure and transparency requirements.”last_img read more

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DHS-CDC deal to share travelers’ data draws fire

first_imgApr 27, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – An agreement between US security and health agencies to share more data about travelers in order to keep infectious diseases out of the country has drawn criticism.The memorandum of understanding, signed in October 2005, provides for increased cooperation between the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). The document was posted Apr 25 on the Web site of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), which has spoken out against the agreement, as has at least one noted infectious disease expert.Under the agreement, more DHS data would be shared with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), an HHS agency.The CDC already had access to paper customs declarations forms, said Ram Koppaka, MD, PhD, chief of the Quarantine and Border Health Services branch in the CDC Division of Global Migration and Quarantine. The agreement formalizes an existing practice of sharing DHS’ customs declarations, and it expands the information sharing to include two other kinds of information: Advance Passenger Information System (APIS) data and Passenger Name Record (PNR) data. DHS would provide the data to CDC only in response to a request and in compliance with existing agreements with other entities, such as the European Union, the agreement states.The DHS agencies involved in the information-sharing agreement are Customs and Border Patrol (CBP), the Coast Guard, and Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), according to the memorandum. Diseases currently classified as “quarantinable” are cholera, diphtheria, infectious tuberculosis, plague, smallpox, yellow fever, viral hemorrhagic fevers, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), and novel or re-emerging influenza strains with pandemic potential.The CDC may in turn disclose necessary information to state and local health departments, the agreement says. The memorandum also calls for DHS to assist with passive and active surveillance of travelers if there are outbreaks of quarantinable diseases or other serious communicable diseases. In particular, the document says the CDC will give DHS a list of signs of H5N1 avian influenza so personnel can watch for them in passengers.The pact also calls for CBP and other DHS agencies to detain travelers at the behest of the CDC because of possible infection with a quarantinable disease. The pact notes that the CDC has legal authority to detain, isolate, or quarantine travelers in such situations, and that CBP, ICE, and the Coast Guard have legal authority to assist such steps.The agreement allows the CDC to carry out what Koppaka called “very fundamental public health activities” of contact investigation, quarantine, and isolation. Contact investigation is used more frequently, although quarantine and isolation issues have generated media attention.”The current mumps outbreak is a great illustration of how inability to efficiently identify and notify those who have been exposed is hampering our ability to mount an effective response,” Koppaka told CIDRAP News. He was referring to an ongoing outbreak involving more than 1,100 people, most of them in Iowa. Two potentially infectious people traveled on nine different commercial airline flights in the course of the outbreak.Koppaka also said the SARS outbreak of 2003 showed the need for better data on travelers. In regard to tracking down potentially exposed passengers on multiple planes, he said, “We were not able, not even in a single case, to ensure a person was notified within the 10- to 14-day incubation period for SARS. We feel that is a critical gap in our ability to respond.”The agreement follows a parallel track to another CDC initiative, which would require airlines and ship operators to report passengers who have certain signs of illness and to keep lists of passengers for at least 60 days after arrival. The 3-month comment period on those proposed rules ended Mar 1, and CDC is reviewing comments, Koppaka said.The ACLU has charged that the agreement between DHS and HHS threatens Americans’ privacy rights and violates a US agreement with the European Union.The pact “is continuing evidence that the American government, and especially its security establishment, does not take privacy and data protection seriously,” said Barry Steinhardt, ACLU Technology and Liberty Project director, in an Apr 25 news release.”Steinhardt said the European Union agreed in 2003 to share PNR data with the United States in return for a DHS pledge not to use the data for anything other than to prevent terrorism or other serious crimes. “It is now clear that DHS did not abide by that agreement,” he charged.But Koppaka, referring to the ACLU, said, “I’m not sure they’re aware that DHS closely reviewed this agreement to make sure it complies with their agreement with the EU. HHS’s understanding is that DHS did the analysis and signed off after determining it was compliant.”The ACLU learned of the DHS-HHS agreement in comments by the Air Transport Association on the CDC’s proposed requirement that airlines report sick passengers, according to an Apr 21 ACLU release. On Apr 20 the organization filed a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request with the federal government for a copy of the agreement and related information, according to the release. By Apr 25 the group had obtained and posted a copy of the agreement on its Web site.The ACLU labeled the pact a “secret agreement” and said it embodies policies that should have been debated in public.But HHS spokeswoman Christina Pearson denied that the agreement was secret, according to an Apr 21 Reuters report. “We have had this agreement in place and it’s to help CDC when there is a report of communicable diseases on an airplane,” she said. The agreement will help the agency locate passengers who may have been exposed and give them information, she added.Another critic of the agreement, according to an Apr 21 Reuters report, was Donald A. Henderson, MD, MPH, an infectious disease physician and distinguished scholar at the Baltimore-based Center for Biosecurity of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.Referring to the provision calling for CBP to detain travelers on behalf of the CDC, Henderson told Reuters, “I was absolutely astonished when I saw that proposed federal regulation. It’s so silly.”Henderson questioned whether there is any evidence that such a system would effectively prevent diseases from spreading, and told Reuters that people can spread influenza and other diseases before they have symptoms.Koppaka emphasized that influenza is not the only disease for which this information sharing might be useful and that the information wouldn’t just be used for quarantine and isolation but also for contact tracing and outbreak investigations.See alsoCopy of the agreement as posted on the ACLU web sitehttp://www.aclu.org/pdfs/privacy/hhs_dhs_mou.pdfApr 25 ACLU news releasehttp://www.aclu.org/privacy/spying/25335prs20060425.htmlApr 21 ACLU news releasehttp://www.aclu.org/privacy/spying/25246prs20060421.htmlNov 22, 2005, CIDRAP News story on CDC updating rules affecting travelershttp://www.cidrap.umn.edu/cidrap/content/influenza/panflu/news/nov2205travelers.htmlApr 19 CIDRAP News story on mumps outbreakhttp://www.cidrap.umn.edu/cidrap/content/other/news/april1906mumps.htmllast_img read more

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