Legacy and Emerging Persistent Organic Pollutants in Antarctic Benthic Invertebrates near Rothera Point, Western Antarctic Peninsula

first_imgThe levels of pollutants in polar regions is gaining progressively more attention from the science community. This is especially so for pollutants that persist in the environment and can reach polar latitudes via a wide range of routes, such as persistent organic pollutants (POPs). In this study samples of Antarctic marine benthic organisms were analysed for legacy and emerging POPs to comprehensively assess the current POPs concentrations in Antarctic benthos and infer the potential sources of the pollutants. Specimens of 5 different benthic invertebrate species were collected in 2 distinct locations near the Rothera Research station (67°35’8″S and 68°7’59″W). Any impact of the nearby Rothera Station as a local source of pollution appeared to be negligible. The most abundant chemicals detected were HCB and BDE-209, reaching the highest concentrations in limpets and urchins, followed by sea stars, ascidians and sea cucumbers. The relative congener patterns of PCBs and PBDEs were almost the same in all species. Some chemicals (e.g. Heptachlor, Oxychlordane and Mirex) were detected in the Antarctic invertebrates for the first time. Statistical methods revealed that the distribution of the POPs is not only driven by the feeding traits of the species, but also by the physico-chemical properties of the individual compounds. Benthic invertebrates are excellent indicators of the contaminant patterns of inshore Antarctic ecosystems.last_img read more

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Mayor Bhalla to host an Iftar dinner at the Monte San…

first_imgSincerely,Ravi S. BhallaMayor, City of Hoboken Dear Editor:With its efforts to ban Muslims from entering our country, it comes as no surprise that the Trump Administration has made many Muslim people feel unwelcome here. So when I was approached about hosting an Iftar dinner as mayor of our great city, it got me thinking about Hoboken’s history.Hoboken’s largest influx of Italian immigrants arrived in the early 1920s, but it took two decades until Hoboken’s Italian-American community had any political representation in City Hall. The Johnson-Reed Act, also known as the Immigration Act of 1924, drastically limited the number of Italian immigrants that were allowed to enter the United States and caused immigration from Italy to rapidly decline. In fact, in the early 20th century, Italian-Americans faced so much discrimination in our region that Frank Sinatra’s own father, Anthony Martin Sinatra, had to change his name to Marty O’Brien in order to be able to compete as a professional boxer.Just as the Trump Administration’s immigration policies cause Muslims to be excluded because of their identity, three generations ago, Italians faced very similar xenophobia. And as is the case today with Muslims seeking entry to our nation, the vast majority of Italian people came to the United States in pursuit of a better life for their families, or because they were fleeing persecution.During the holy month of Ramadan, Muslims end their daily fast at sunset with an Iftar dinner. Iftar dinners are often observed as a community. Given our long history as a city of immigrants, when Atif Qadir, a Muslim Hoboken resident, asked me about organizing an Iftar dinner in Hoboken, the Monte San Giacomo Club at 531 Adams St. was the first place that came to mind. I called one of the club’s members, Luigi Percontino and, without hesitating, the club graciously agreed to host this dinner to welcome Muslim residents in Hoboken.It is a great honor to serve as the Mayor of a city where an older immigrant community would so warmly welcome a new one. At our gathering on Saturday June 30, a long table was blessed with a traditional Italian meal, residents of diverse backgrounds, and halal dishes. To quote our city’s favorite son, Frank Sinatra, “That’s America to me.”last_img read more

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GSAS Dean Allan Brandt to step down

first_imgAllan M. Brandt, who pioneered a new approach to curricular development with the launch of the Graduate Seminars in General Education, led a transformation in admissions practices that resulted in the enrollment of a record number of minority students, and shepherded Harvard’s Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (GSAS) through the recent fiscal downturn, announced Wednesday that he will step down as GSAS dean this spring owing to health considerations, following a recently diagnosed illness. He plans to return to the faculty when his treatment is concluded.“It has been a truly great honor to serve in this role, to work with the remarkable staff of the Graduate School, our talented alumni, and our exceptional faculty and students,” Brandt said, in a message to GSAS staff. “I have found a deep sense of satisfaction and pride in leading this Graduate School since 2008, and I have been tremendously rewarded by my connection to all of you, and to our important work. I will greatly look forward to my return to the faculty and re-engaging in the critically important work of graduate education.”“In a period marked by dramatic change across the Harvard community, Allan Brandt distinguished himself as a dedicated leader of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and as an eloquent voice in support of the University’s highest intellectual aspirations,” President Drew Faust said. “His innovative work on pedagogy, support for teaching and learning, and steadfast leadership through fiscal challenges will continue to be felt by students, faculty, and staff across Harvard. I am deeply grateful for his service, and wish him a speedy and full recovery.”In a message to many in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) community announcing Brandt’s departure, FAS Dean Michael D. Smith said Brandt has overseen a period of unprecedented change and growth that transformed nearly all facets of the Graduate School.Since being appointed in 2008, Brandt has overseen five GSAS admission cycles, during which application totals have risen steadily. Under his leadership, the Graduate School also committed itself to increasing diversity in its Ph.D. programs. Changes in recruitment, admission, and retention efforts last year resulted in the most successful yield of admitted minority students, and a 23 percent jump in applications this year.Once students arrive on campus, Brandt has been instrumental in enhancing their experience at Harvard through efforts to adopt best practices in graduate advising and mentoring, through increases to the funding package offered to graduate students, and through the creation of programs that help graduate students navigate a challenging academic job market by developing pathways for Ph.D.s in industry and policymaking as well as the academy.In addition to efforts to bring graduate students into the curricular development process through the Graduate Seminars in General Education, Smith said, Brandt was instrumental in increasing support for graduate student teaching through innovative course work at the Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning. Such programs have helped graduate students continue to play a critical role in sustaining Harvard’s academic excellence at both the undergraduate and graduate level.“In addition to being a medical historian of international standing, Allan has been a truly remarkable dean for our Graduate School,” Smith said. “I feel privileged to have worked alongside Allan for the past four years. Please join me in thanking Allan for his service to the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, and for stewarding our Graduate School with such discerning vision and far-reaching dedication.”“Dean Brandt was incredibly attuned to the challenges that graduate students face,” said Benjamin Woodring, a Ph.D. candidate in English. “I worked with him on a variety of issues as president of the Graduate Student Council, and he was always receptive to our concerns and willing to help us think about how to advance them. His dedication to strong mentoring practices at the graduate level made a qualitative difference in the way many of us have experienced our graduate programs.“Dean Brandt also inspired students to think expansively about the potential of the work we’re doing at Harvard,” Woodring added. “He made us believe in the impact our work could have on the world — and in the crucial importance of the mission we’re all engaged in.”Richard Tarrant, the Pope Professor of the Latin Language and Literature, will serve as interim dean while the search for Brandt’s replacement takes place. Tarrant previously served as acting dean from 1995 to 1996.Richard Tarrant, the Pope Professor of the Latin Language and Literature, will serve as interim dean while the search for Brandt’s replacement takes place. Tarrant previously served as acting dean from 1995 to 1996. Photo by Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer“Allan Brandt has led the Graduate School with commitment, imagination, and boundless energy, and it saddens me to be standing in for him under difficult circumstances,” Tarrant said. “I wish him all the very best for his treatment and recovery. I am deeply grateful to Allan and to Dean Smith for the trust they have placed in me, and I look forward to working with Administrative Dean Margot Gill and the outstanding GSAS staff to carry forward the mission of the Graduate School in the coming months.”Brandt, professor of the history of science and Amalie Moses Kass Professor of the History of Medicine, first came to Harvard as an instructor in 1982. He was promoted to assistant professor, then associate professor, before leaving for the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, from 1990 to 1992. He returned to Harvard in 1992 as a professor in both FAS and the Medical School.In his nearly three decades at Harvard, Brandt has been an active member of numerous FAS committees, including the Health Policy Interfaculty Initiative, Special Concentrations, the Library Committee, and the Historical Studies Core Committee. He also served as a member of the Faculty Council (1992-95). At the Medical School, he has served on the Conflict of Interest Committee, Rare Books and Archives Committee, Joint Library Committee, Subcommittee of Professors, and Academic Promotions Committee. He served as chair of the Department of the History of Science from 2000 to 2006, and from 1996 to 2004 as director of the Division of Medical Ethics at the Medical School.Brandt’s major research interests include the social history of American medicine, science, and public health; ethics and values in health care; history of human subject research; and American social and political history. He has written extensively about ethical and policy issues in the history of disease. His 2007 book on the social and cultural history of tobacco use, “The Cigarette Century: The Rise, Fall, and Deadly Persistence of the Product That Defined America,” was awarded the Albert J. Beveridge Prize from the American Historical Association and the Arthur Viseltear Prize from the American Public Health Association.Outside of Harvard, Brandt has been adviser and committee member for numerous health organizations, including the World Health Organization AIDS/HIV Program, the Hastings Center Study Group on AIDS and Civil Liberties, and two AIDS/HIV-focused committees of the National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Medicine.Born in Washington, D.C., Brandt received an M.A. (1975), an M.Phil. (1978), and a Ph.D. (1983), all in American history from Columbia University. His B.A. degree in history is from Brandeis University.last_img read more

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Trump’s Doctor Says He Can Resume Public Events Starting Saturday

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) The White House / Joyce N. Boghosian WASHINGTON – President Trump’s physician says he expects trump to resume public engagements on Saturday.The White House released a memo from Doctor Sean Conley on Thursday saying Trump has finished his course of therapy for COVID-19.The memo says Saturday will mark ten days since President Trump tested positive.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says Coronavirus patients should isolate at least that long after symptoms begin. They also have to be fever-free for 24 hours without the help of medication. President Trump hasn’t been sighted independently, but he’s been working in the oval office.The President says he believes he’s now immune to COVID-19.Science only indicates survivors might have some protections from the virus for an unknown period.last_img read more

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Scatec Solar starts commercial operation at first phase of 258MW South African solar park

first_imgScatec Solar starts commercial operation at first phase of 258MW South African solar park FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享PV Tech:Scatec Solar and its partners have both grid connected and reached commercial operation for the 86MW first phase of a 258MW PV installation in Upington, South Africa. The first phase of the project, known as Sirius, is expected to generate 217 GWh of renewable energy and cut down on more than 180,000 tonnes of CO2 emissions annually.The solar facility in Upington, which will be comprised of three total phases, was awarded back in April 2015 through the fourth bidding round of the Renewable Energy Independent Power Producer Programme (REIPP) in South Africa.Ownership of the plant is split between Scatec Solar (42%), Norfund (18%), South African investor H1 Holdings (35%) and the surrounding community of Upington (5%).The remaining two phases of the installation, featuring a combined installed capacity of 172MW, are expected to reach commercial operation over the next couple of months.South Africa has continued to allocate more and more resources toward expanding its renewable-energy sector, especially thanks to a number of measures taken over the last couple of months. Back in October 2019, the country’s Department of Mineral Resources and Energy (DMRE) signed off on a ruling to set aside 6GW of new large-scale solar over the next decade, with this new Integrated Resource Plan (IRP) allocating the capacity in 1GW instalments each year in 2022, 2023, 2025 and from 2028-30. South Africa had already committed solar allocations of 114MW in 2020, 300MW in 2021, and 400MW in 2022.[Conor Ryan]More: Scatec Solar completes first phase of 258MW PV project in South Africalast_img read more

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Karlovac County and Karlovac are richer by 15 interpretation guides

first_imgIt is in this segment that Karlovac County sees its opportunity for growth and development. Thus, with the aim of raising the quality of heritage interpretation services and guide services, the Karlovac County Tourist Board and the Karlovac Tourist Board organized the training of professionals who meet the need for heritage interpretation in their work, which should be adapted to different target groups.  “This education is a continuation of the activities we carry out in the city of Karlovac together with all partners. Our goal is to respond to new trends and raise the value and quality of the destination. Since the education is focused on a different, more interesting presentation of natural and cultural heritage, we are sure that it will help everyone who participated to present Karlovac in a quality way, and to achieve a common goal, and that is a satisfied guest.” said Marina Burić, director of the Tourist Board of the city of Karlovac. The training program includes a 40-hour training, is licensed by the Interpret Europe association, and the educator is the first licensed interpretation guide in Croatia and the author of the Secret Zagreb tour, Mrs. Iva Silla. Interpret Europe is a European professional association that brings together about 1000 professionals in the field of heritage interpretation from 55 countries. “Nowadays, most tourists and visitors truly enjoy getting to know new locations, their history and culture, and this is one of the most common travel motives when choosing a destination. But these historical curiosities are more impressive if they are presented in a way that evokes emotion and encourages interaction between the guide and the group, and this education program is just going in that direction. In this context, we can say that with this intensive five-day program we want to adapt to today’s trends and at the same time give this opportunity to all those who want to improve their knowledge and interpretation skills. The ultimate goal of all these activities is to raise the quality of services in the destination, and the interest of participants showed that we are on the right track”Said Dina Begić, director of the Karlovac County Tourist Board. Photo: TZ Karlovac And there is no better way than telling stories than through storytelling, whose main mantra is – sell me a story, not a product. A group of 15 registered participants in Karlovac started the course in mid-November. The theoretical part was held in the area of ​​Aquatika and the Franciscan monastery, while the practical part was held at various locations in the city and county. The wish of the organizers and participants of the course is that the richness of heritage is worthily passed on to visitors through interesting facts, facts, information, emotions and experience. I keep emphasizing how tourism consists of emotions, experiences and stories. It is our authentic stories that are the strongest content that makes us unique and that, after all, creates the motive of coming, because people travel to meet and experience a new way and culture of living. People travel to experience something new and different. Tell stories. Our authentic stories.last_img read more

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PGN to develop three domestic LNG hubs for power plant gasification plan

first_imgState-owned gas firm PT Perusahaan Gas Negara (PGN) plans to convert three liquefied natural gas (LNG) terminals into regional gas distribution hubs as part of a government program to cut oil imports.PGN, which expects to spend US$2.5 billion to execute the program, plans to focus the funding on developing its LNG terminal in Arun, Aceh, developing its floating storage regasification unit (FSRU) in Lampung, Sumatra, and building a third terminal in Ambon, the capital of Maluku.It will use the three terminals to channel fuel for 52 compressed natural gas (CNG)-fired power plants in western, central and eastern Indonesia. Read also: PGN to spend $2.5 billion to support PLN’s gasification programThe power plants, owned by state-owned electricity giant PLN, can run on both gas and diesel fuel but have been using more of the latter for logistical convenience.PGN president director Suko Hartono said in a statement on Monday that the program was expected to “improve the primary energy mix for PLN plants and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.”Gas-fired power plants emit less greenhouse gases than coal or diesel plants, but their environmental credentials are still a far cry from plants harnessing wind, solar or geothermal power or another source of renewable energy. “The terminals will respectively serve western, central and eastern Indonesia. The development plan includes acquiring pipelines, ships, trucks and supporting facilities,” PGN said in the statement.Gasifying power plants are one of many government programs launched to slash oil imports, which has been a leading contributor to the country’s trade deficit in the past, a key vulnerability for Southeast Asia’s largest economy.PGN and PLN plan to gasify three of the 52 plants this year, namely those on Nias Island (North Sumatra), Tanjung Selor (North Kalimantan) and Sorong (West Papua). The three plants – described by both companies as “quick wins” – had been chosen because they were most ready in terms of infrastructure, operational capacity and local demand, said PLN primary energy director Rudy Hendra Prastowo.“The remainder of the 52 plants are, to be frank, spread out and isolated. We will have to assess their feasibility,” he told The Jakarta Post on Tuesday.“In this stage, we aim to provide gas at a lower price than high-speed diesel,” said PGN business development director Syahrial Mukhtar.The two state-owned enterprises have until January 2022 to complete the gasification program, according to Energy and Mineral Resources Ministry Decree No. 13/2020.With the program, the electricity company expects to cut diesel consumption by 1 million kiloliters and save Rp 4 trillion ($277 million) in fuel spending.Read also: PLN to use LNG in 52 power plants to help reduce oil importscenter_img Topics :last_img read more

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Governor Wolf Orders Commonwealth Flags at Half-Staff to Honor the Victims of the Shooting in Thousand Oaks, California

first_img November 08, 2018 Flag Order,  National Issues,  Press Release,  Public Safety Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf has ordered all commonwealth flags on the Capitol Complex, at Commonwealth facilities, and throughout the state lowered to half-staff, effective immediately. This order is being issued as a mark of respect for the victims of the attack in Thousand Oaks, California.All commonwealth flags should be flown at half-staff until sunset on Saturday, November 10, 2018.Per an order from the White House, the United States Flag has been ordered to fly at half-staff until sunset on Saturday, November 10, 2018. Governor Wolf Orders Commonwealth Flags at Half-Staff to Honor the Victims of the Shooting in Thousand Oaks, Californiacenter_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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Woman gives ‘Nyaope’ addicts a second chance

first_imgA street drug in South Africa is destroying lives in many townships and is becoming an ever growing problem with the youth. But, one woman in Tembisa township just outside Johannesburg, is determined to put an end to the scourge of Nyaope. CCTV’s Julie Scheier reports. Cairo’s all-woman gas station Related Zimbabwe bans second hand clothes imports Young woman ditches anthropology for dancinglast_img

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Academic Team’s Regional Super Bowl Results

first_imgState-IDStudents (L-R) PicturedFront: Carleigh Siebert, Joey Barr, Hannah RodgersBack: Kent Wilson, Austin Meyer, Adam Glaub, Tyler Ralston, Derek NobbeBatesville High School’s academic teams will be going to the state competition Saturday (May 7) after hosting the 2016 Regional Indiana Academic Super Bowl Senior Division on Tuesday, April 19, in the Batesville Middle School gym.The team’s 6 squads, English, Science, Fine Arts, Social Studies, Math, and Interdisciplinary, competed against 4 other Class 2 academic teams in the area: Franklin County, Greensburg, Rushville, and South Dearborn.Other schools competing within their classes at the meet were as follows:Class 1- East CentralClass 2 – Lawrenceburg, Milan, Switzerland CountyClass 4 – Jac-Cen-Del, NorthDecatur, Rising Sun, South Ripley, and South Decatur.5 of the 6 Batesville Teams placed 1st in Class 2: English, Science, Fine Arts, Social Studies, and Interdisciplinary.State-ScienceFront: Mikhaill Blaine, Nate DunbarBack: Austin Meyer, Tyler Ralston, Derek Nobbe, Coleman JenneweinThe Batesville Math team placed 2nd. The Batesville Science team missed only 1 question of the 25.The state results came in Wednesday, April 20, after all participating teams’ scores were submitted from around the state on April 19.Batesville High School had 3 squads qualify for the state Super Bowl on May 7 at Purdue University’s Loeb Playhouse: Science, Social Studies, and Interdisciplinary teams.Science squad members are Derek Nobbe (co-captain), Tyler Ralston (co-captain), Austin Meyer, Coleman Jennewein, Madeline Greene, Kiley Cline, Kyle Emsweller, James Wyatt, Dylan Flannery, Mikhaill Blaine, Lain Goewert, Nathaniel Dunbar, and Hannah Simpson.State-Social StudiesBen Craft, Tyler Ralston, Adam Glaub, Kent Wilson, Kyle EmswellerSocial Studies squad members are Adam Glaub (captain), Ben Craft, Derek Nobbe, Kyle Emsweller, Tyler Ralston, Kiley Cline, Kelly Gole, Kent Wilson, Dylan Flannery, and Melanie Werner.Interdisciplinary squad members are Kent Wilson (captain), Carleigh Siebert, Joey Barr, Derek Nobbe, Austin Meyer, Tyler Ralston, Adam Glaub, Grace Heppner, Molly Jones, and Hannah Rodgers.Good Luck at State!last_img read more

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