How new Faculty of Occupational Health Nursing could change the workplace health landscape

first_img Reply Related posts: Ralph Laing 7 Aug 2019 at 4:58 am # i think this is quite important How new Faculty of Occupational Health Nursing could change the workplace health landscapeBy Nic Paton on 2 Nov 2018 in Clinical governance, Manufacturing, OH service delivery, Research, Occupational Health, Personnel Today Occupational health education facing a challenging future post pandemicThere were serious concerns about the future of occupational health training even before the pandemic threw our education system up… One Response to How new Faculty of Occupational Health Nursing could change the workplace health landscapecenter_img Leave a Reply Click here to cancel reply.Comment Name (required) Email (will not be published) (required) Website Previous Article Next Article October saw the launch of the new Faculty of Occupational Health Nursing. What exactly is it, how will it work and what will it cost to join? Equally importantly, how will – can it, even – change the workplace health landscape? Nic Paton looks for answers.Back in the autumn of 2016, a respondent to a nationwide survey of occupational health nurses undertaken by the then-nascent Faculty of Occupational Health Nursing’s Development Group articulated the intense frustration felt by many OH nurses at their perceived lack of a voice, representation and even recognition within the profession.“The Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) does not support OH practitioners, the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) is a toothless lion and there is nothing for me to tap into to support my practice,” the OH nurse said.That survey of 1,429 nurses, carried out with the publishing group The At Work Partnership, concluded that barely a fifth – 17% – of nurses felt “represented” by an occupational health body. Fewer than half (44%) felt “professionally supported” at work, despite most (93%) being members of the RCN. Nearly nine out of 10 (87%) felt a faculty for OH nurses would be beneficial, and nearly three out of four (74%) said they would be happy to join such an organisation.What this highlighted, as this publication reported at the time, was that – on paper at least – there was “genuine enthusiasm” for the notion of new faculty specifically for OH nurses.Who represents FOHN?Eventually, of course, the new Faculty of Occupational Health Nursing will be all about its membership. But the process of setting up and establishing the faculty has been led by the FOHN Development Group, which has been made up of qualified occupational health nurses. The group has comprised:Christina Butterworth (chair). Christina Butterworth, also chief operating officer of the faculty, is now semi-retired, but a director of Optimal Health Consulting. Her notable roles have included health and safety specialist at Crossrail and head of health at BG Group. She represents OH nursing on the Council for Work and Health and National School of Occupational Health. She was awarded an Honorary Fellowship from the Faculty of Occupational Medicine in 2015 for leadership in OH nursing.Fiona King (deputy chair and treasurer). Fiona is senior OH manager at HS2, where she is pioneering health strategies in the construction sector to improve health outcomes for the individuals working there.Susanna Everton (governance). Susanna Everton is a freelance OH nurse and safety consultant with a special interest and expertise in OH and safety management systems and health surveillance, particularly hearing and noise. She is a member of the BSI Committee HS/001 OH and Safety Management and is a CMIOSH.Joanna Elliot (business development). Joanna Elliot is chief nursing adviser, lead practitioner and OH manager, working within health and social care, justice and the communications industry in England, Scotland and Northern IrelandAllison Caine (communication and marketing). Allison Caine is founder of Occupational Health Business Management Ltd, working in industries as diverse as manufacturing, education, care providers, food manufacturers, engineering and construction.Elisabeth Eades (education). A Bart’s Nurse, Liz Eades was an A&E sister before moving into occupational health to work as the “store sister” at Debenhams in Oxford Street. Until recently, she was a member of the HR senior management team at Surrey Police.Lyndsey Marchant (membership services). Lyndsey Marchant completed her initial nurse education in the Royal Navy, worked in the prison service and set up her own company Phoenix Occupational Health Ltd in 2011, working across education, manufacturing and engineering. She was also an auditor for the Fit for Work service during its pilot scheme and has been a director for the Association of Occupational Health Nurse Practitioners.Scroll forward two years, and last month (October) saw the formal launch of the Faculty of Occupational Health Nursing (FOHN). What this means, of course, is we now come to the moment of truth as to whether that enthusiasm from 2016 is still there, and if it will translate into OH nurses backing, supporting and, crucially, being prepared to join this new body.Chief operating officer Christina Butterworth tells Occupational Health & Wellbeing: “Obviously, building the membership base is going to take time, whether we end up with 100 or 1,000. I’d hope that at the very least we’d be able to achieve perhaps 500 members as a starting point.”What, then, is this new faculty all about? What is it going to do or focus on? What will be the benefit for OH nurses in joining? And what is it all going to cost?Butterworth outlines that the faculty will have three core workstreams: creating and disseminating standards on best practice; developing education standards and OH nurse career frameworks; and acting as an advocate for the OH nursing profession.As she explains: “On professional standards, we will continue to engage with the NMC to ensure they meet the requirement for registration and revalidation but also ensure that they meet the quality expectations for OH nursing.“Then, on education, we will focus on career development for OHNs and set an educational curriculum for specialist training, working with the National School of Occupational Health to make sure there is also a quality educational process.“We want to be ensuring OH nurses are better supported in their career development, both those who are new to the specialty and those who are already working in practice. It is about not seeing OH as just a job, but a worthwhile career,” she adds.Guide on OH nurses for employersIndeed, one of the faculty’s first publications is due to be a guide for employers about what an OH nurse should look like and what qualifications should be expected, building on Public Health England’s 2016 document Educating Occupational Health Nurses: an approach to align education with a service vision for occupational health nurses.“Finally, on representation, we intend very much to act as a voice for OH nurses. We want to ensure OHNs are represented at both national and regional levels, within practice-specific networks and forums,” says Butterworth.“We want to ensure OHNs or nurses working in occupational health are proud of their achievements and to showcase good practice. We want to ensure that all stakeholders are coming to us for comment and insight, and we are already working with bodies such as the Health and Safety Executive and we will be continuing to work with the Council for Work and Health,” she adds.One key element of this networking and representation activity is the intention to hold an annual “hearts and minds” networking and professional practice conference for members. While it is still early days, the aim at the moment is this will probably take place around June next year.“Another important element is ensuring our members and others interested in occupational health are kept well-informed, whether through our website or e-newsletter. We will start sending out social media alerts from the middle of October,” explains Butterworth.FOHN will be setting up two committees: professional development and quality and practice, and the intention is that there will be a number of CPD workshops held on key projects. We will also use the power of social media to engage with our members and others with both a Facebook and LinkedIn group.“It [the faculty] is also about connecting people with their peers; helping OHNs to realise that, even if they are working single-handed or in isolation, they are not alone in their practice. It is very much about trying to create a one-stop-shop for OH nurses, within which the website is likely to be very important,” Butterworth adds.Relationship to NMCIs there likely to be a risk – or an opportunity, depending on your point of view – that FOHN will start to step on the toes of the NMC in terms of regulation and standards? After all, Part 3 of the register may be part of the review that is underway at the NMC and, as we reported in October’s edition of Occupational Health & Wellbeing, there are growing question-marks over the future of NMC-approved Specialist Community Public Health Nurse (SCPHN) occupational health courses.Butterworth emphasises that the faculty is very much not about invading the NMC’s turf. “The NMC has no objections in us setting out voluntary standards. They may not necessarily be NMC-approved, but the NMC is not averse in principle to us setting standards, especially if it all helps to raise and maintain standards of professional practice and public safety,” she points out. But she adds: “The NMC’s standards by their nature have to be quite generalist, because they have to serve all nurses. So we can work to create a much more specific range of standards for OH nurses.“It is very much about recognising all people who do good work within occupational health, and not just those who are on Part 3 of the register. There are many, many nurses out there who are not on Part 3 but do very good work. Their knowledge and experience just does not happen to be recognised fully by the NMC as they did not complete an approved course.“We’ll be looking at areas such as’ quality of training, how to put theory into practice and how OH nurses impact practice through their behaviour. We will also be also be looking hard at determining how we assess all that in order to give due recognition,” explains Butterworth.In terms of funding, the intention is that the faculty will become self-sustaining through income from membership, CPD and other services. Up to now, its development costs have been covered through a partnership with Kays Medical, with whom the faculty will continue to work on a number of projects.Predominantly virtual organisationTo keep costs down, the faculty will primarily be a virtual organisation (hence the focus on webinars, the e-newsletter, the website and the LinkedIn group). But it will also have a physical address at the Faculty of Occupational Medicine’s new offices in Greenwich, south east London, including access to the Education Centre for Occupational Health, which is also located there.In terms of the specifics of membership, the original plan had been for FOHN to merge with the Association of Occupational Health Nurse Practitioners and offer joint membership. But this fell through in the summer (see below ) and so membership of the faculty will be £120 for a year for individuals and £80 for affiliates.“There will be a range of member benefits that people can sign up for – discounts on things such as indemnity insurance and so on. But the main benefit is simply going to be the access you get to professional standards, to educational development and peer and social networks,” explains Butterworth.“You cannot wrap indemnity insurance into the membership for ‘free’ because then you run the risk of it being viewed like PPI and will potentially get us into all sorts of issues. There will in time I think be a specialty register, which will be an additional cost for members to sign up to. So it may be that, by the second year, there will be that additional benefit,” she adds.What, then, about the view from outside, from within the profession itself? While, naturally, there is still a long way to go, the faculty does appear to have the goodwill of many working within occupational health behind it.As one OH nurse, who wished to remain anonymous, tells Occupational Health & Wellbeing: “I don’t think you’ll find anyone in OH who doesn’t feel the advent of the FOHN is a good thing.”Another, Jo Clayton – a member of the UK Occupational Health Practitioners Facebook Group – says: “I’m hoping it’s going to support and direct with clear guidelines and standards etc. I really hope this is the case. I often feel misled…. lost…. confused and I’m hoping to stop feeling like this.”However, cost will be an important issue, she concedes, given the multiple and competing membership demands (such as the RCN and NMC) there are already on OH practitioner budgets. Having said that, the attraction of FOHN as a fresh alternative could be compelling, as Clayton highlights. “I am fed up with forking out for NMC and RCN and being rewarded for my hard-earned cash with nothing but a handbag diary!”“It is going to be really interesting to hear what people say about the faculty,” agrees FOHN development group member Liz Eades. “I think the faculty is about giving a voice to OH nurses, which is something we have not had before. If I think back over the years, I have had the occasional conversation with Dame Carol Black, who has often said that we – OH nurses – need to come forward more.“OH nurses are not good at that, nor are we good at shouting about what we do and can do; we are not good at promoting ourselves and helping others to understand what it is we can offer. Because we tend to be so busy running around doing our jobs, we do not have the time or space to promote ourselves and push ourselves forward.“So I see the faculty as giving OH nurses a certain extra gravitas. It is not a union, it is a professional body, and I think we as a profession need a professional body, a professional voice. It is going to be the professional body that underpins nursing practice, as well as a networking body and advocate. It will also be about sponsoring research and academic work as well as offering members some benefits, such as subsidised indemnity insurance,” she adds.The failed mergerIn June, it emerged that the faculty and the Association of Occupational Health Nurse Practitioners (AOHNP) had called off the merger (including joint membership) that had been set to go ahead when the faculty formally launched last month.In a statement at the time, FOHN said: “With less than five months before the launch of the FOHN on 1 October 2018 and with no formal agreement made or transition committee in place, the FOHN Development Group has decided to focus on the launch and establishment of the new standard setting organisation and progressing its strategic objectives.“Both organisations will continue to work as separate entities until any future merger arrangements have been agreed. Irrespective of this decision, there is clearly a need for the FOHN and AOHNP to work together to avoid unnecessary duplication of services, save costs and provide a unified voice to the external world,” it added.FOHN emphasised that it would have its own fee structure from October but would also “honour our promise of a discounted membership for present AOHNP members for the first year.”The failure of this merger has raised eyebrows on both sides. One AOHNP member, who wished to remain anonymous, contacted Occupational Health & Wellbeing to express concern that there had been no clear explanation as to why the merger had failed to go forward, especially since it had received strong backing from AOHNP members the previous summer.“Regardless of any issues FOHN might be thinking of tackling for OH nursing, it may also have to do some bridge-building if it wants the unqualified support of the AOHNP,” the member said.“Personally, I’ve let my AOHNP membership lapse and am throwing my hat in with the FOHN, which I feel is better for the good of OH nursing in general going forward,” they added.Nevertheless, FOHN development group member Liz Eades suggests that, even though things have not worked out between the two organisations this time round, it may be a case of “never say never”.“It was very unfortunate. I really cannot understand quite why it failed because I think it is potentially going to weaken both bodies rather than making them stronger. But I do think it may come back on to the agenda at some point,” she says. Five ways OH can make itself indispensable during Covid-19Much as it is causing intense day-to-day challenges, Covid-19 is also offering OH practitioners – nurses and physicians – a… Occupational Health & Wellbeing research round-up: December 2020Fatigue and workplace exercise programmesWork-related fatigue is related to a range of negative consequences, including poor productivity. This study…last_img read more

Read More →

Calling all founders: Howard Lorber’s Vector Group launches VC arm

first_img Email Address* Share via Shortlink Richard Lampen and Howard Lorber (Vector Group)Developer, investor and brokerage head Howard Lorber is trying on a new role for size: venture capitalist.His company, Vector Group, is pivoting its real estate business — which includes brokerage Douglas Elliman and new development firm New Valley — into investing in early-stage proptech companies, the firm confirmed to The Real Deal.The announcement comes on the heels of Vector’s real estate businesses reporting a net loss of $75.9 million in 2020, the second consecutive year of losses.The new VC arm’s initial bets include a minority non-controlling stake in Rechat, a customer relationship management platform, and investments in proptech funds such as Camber Creek Fund, which counts Notarize, Curbio and Flex among its portfolio.New Valley Ventures will be spearheaded by Vector’s new chief operating officer Richard Lampen, who was appointed in January, though he has served as Vector’s executive vice president since 1995. During that time, Lampen was the CEO of Ladenburg Thalmann Financial Services. He returned to working at Vector full-time last February, after Ladenburg’s broker deal network sold for $1.3 billion to Advisor Group and Reverence Capital Partners.Read moreDouglas Elliman reports $14M profit, 50% revenue jump in quarterElliman reports $12M profit in third quarter after a year of heavy lossesHoward Lorber’s comp is too damn high: Investors Full Name* Tags Message* Now, he’s looking to kickstart a new line of business for Vector’s real estate segment.“Vector’s a significantly sized company with significant resources and we have a very large residential and new development business today but, listen, we hope that New Valley Ventures over time will take its place as an important contributor,” Lampen said in an interview.He declined to comment how much capital the new VC arm has to deploy, but confirmed the investment division was being funded exclusively by Vector.Lampen hired Dan Sachar to act as the new division’s managing director and serve as a vice president of enterprise innovation at Vector. Sachar will work alongside David Ballard, who was recently hired as Vector’s chief technology officer. Both Sachar and Ballard previously worked at Ladenburg Thalmann developing technology for its financial advisors.New Valley Ventures’ primary focus is investing in companies that are developing technology for agents.“We are finding new tools that we think can improve things that are at the heart of the services that agents offer now,” said Sachar. “[But] we are also looking at some opportunities that add new things to what agents can offer, and I think that’s going to be a big part of our focus.”The VC division will work closely with Douglas Elliman when selecting investments, consulting with Scott Durkin, Elliman’s president and COO, as well as Connie Mui-Reilly, the brokerage’s chief information officer. But the brokerage will opt to use technology developed by its portfolio companies on a case-by-case basis. In the case of Rechat, the brokerage will adopt the platform nationally this spring.Sachar noted that the investment approach is not premised on exclusive use by Elliman or Vector’s new development arm.“We want to invest in an independent company that can move at the speed of a younger emerging startup and can innovate and develop tools and features at a fast pace,” he said.Lampen expects New Valley Ventures’ close ties to Elliman will serve as a draw for startups, but he noted that the VC arm is not focused exclusively on residential brokerage. He pointed to Vector’s new development arm, as well as its services in property management, real estate investment, mortgage financing, and title and escrow services, noting that Vector is looking to scale a variety of real estate businesses in these sectors.“The hope is that we can bring these companies more than just our ability to write a check,” said Lampen.He declined to comment on future investments or whether Vector was contemplating launching a special-purpose acquisition company, or SPAC, which has become the vehicle of choice for proptech investors in recent months. But he’s not ruling out anything.“We’re still in the early stages of it,” said Lampen. “How significant our activities are is really going to be a function of the opportunities that present themselves to us.”Contact Erin Hudson Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink BrokerageDouglas EllimanProptechResidential Real Estatelast_img read more

Read More →

An investigation into the roles of ECH and whistler mode waves in the formation of ‘pancake’ electron distributions using data from the CRRES satellite

first_imgElectron pitch angle distributions sharply peaked at 90 degrees pitch angle were first recorded in the energy range 50 eV < E < 500 eV by the GEOS-1 and GEOS-2 spacecraft in 1977/8, from the plasmapause out to geostationary orbit. At the time they were explained as the remnants of pitch angle diffusion driven solely by Electron Cyclotron Harmonic (ECH) waves. Here we use observations by instruments on board the CRRES spacecraft to study these distributions in more detail. The pancake distributions are now seen to develop from injected distributions that are nearly isotropic in velocity space, on a time scale that is greater than 2 hours. The freshly injected distributions are associated with strong ECH and whistler mode waves suggesting that the pancake distributions are likely to be caused by a combination of both wave types. Our results suggest that whistler mode waves play a dominant role in the formation of pancake distributions outside L = 6.0, whereas inside L = 6.0 and, in particular, in the vicinity of the plasmapause, the ECH waves also play a significant role. Consequently both types of waves should be considered in any attempt to explain the diffuse aurora and the variation with L taken into account. (C) 2000 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.last_img read more

Read More →

Jazz avenge loss with 111-97 win over Lakers in rematch

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailLOS ANGELES (AP) — Jordan Clarkson scored 22 points, Joe Ingles added 21 with five 3-pointers and the Utah Jazz beat the Los Angeles Lakers 111-97, splitting their series with the defending NBA champs.Bojan Bogdanovic scored 19 points as NBA-leading Utah avenged the Lakers’ 127-115 overtime victory on Saturday night.The Jazz rested Rudy Gobert, Mike Conley Jr. and Derrick Favors in the first game on the second night of a back-to-back set, but all three returned for the rematch at Staples Center.Talen Horton-Tucker scored a career-high 24 points for the Lakers, who dropped to 7-9 without Anthony Davis and LeBron James. Written by Tags: NBA/Utah Jazz April 20, 2021 /Sports News – Local Jazz avenge loss with 111-97 win over Lakers in rematch Associated Presslast_img read more

Read More →

Watch Nathaniel Rateliff, The Roots, Chuck Berry’s Son And Grandson Perform Together On Fallon

first_imgOn Friday, after a great deal of buildup, rock and roll forefather Chuck Berry posthumously released his final album, Chuck, his first solo record since 1979’s Rock It. In honor of the release of the album, Nathaniel Rateliff and Berry’s son and grandson Chuck Berry Jr. and Chuck Berry III, who are all featured on the album, made their way to The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon. Backed by Fallon’s unbeatable house band, The Roots, Rateliff and the Berrys ran through a rockin’ rendition of Chuck single “Big Boys.” You can watch the performance below, courtesy of the Tonight Show‘s YouTube:Shortly after the rock legend’s death, Berry’s family confirmed that Chuck, the album that he had been working on at the time of his death, would still be released. Berry had announced the new album on his 90th birthday on October 18th of last year, making it the first solo album he’d worked on in over 38 years. The album includes recordings from 1991 until 2014, and will mark the first release of new material since Berry’s 1979 album Rock It.You can listen to Chuck tracks “Big Boys,” “Wonderful Woman,” and “Johnny B. Goode” spiritual follow-up “Lady B. Goode” now, or stream the full album below:You can also watch the official video for “Big Boys,” Berry’s first and only music video ever, below via Dualtone:last_img read more

Read More →

Tanzania says no plans in place to accept COVID-19 vaccines

first_imgDODOMA, Tanzania (AP) — Tanzania’s health ministry says it has no plans in place to accept COVID-19 vaccines, just days after the president of the country of 60 million people expressed doubt about the vaccines without offering evidence. Tanzania’s government has been widely criticized for its approach to the pandemic. It has not updated its number of coronavirus infections _ 509 _ since April. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in its latest travel warning on Tanzania says the country’s level of COVID-19 is “very high.” It gave no details but urged against all travel to the East African nation.last_img read more

Read More →

Damien Molony on Working with Patrick Stewart & Ian McKellen in London’s No Man’s Land

first_imgDamien Molony in ‘No Man’s Land'(Photo: Johan Persson) The fall theater season in London gets off to a starry start with the opening at Wyndham’s Theatre of No Man’s Land, the 1975 Harold Pinter play starring the actor-knights Ian McKellen and Patrick Stewart, who played the same roles on Broadway in 2013. Joining them this time around are 1997 Tony winner Owen Teale and the fast-rising Irish actor Damien Molony. The youngest of the cast, Molony took time during a pre-London run of the show in Cardiff, Wales, to talk about acting Pinter’s famous pauses and sharing the stage with two titanic talents.How does it feel to open No Man’s Land at the same West End playhouse, Wyndham’s, where the first production ran in 1975?It’s also the very first play I went to see when I was training at drama school in London was Derek Jacobi in Twelfth Night at Wyndham’s. I remember sitting so high up in the balcony that I thought I was going to faint. So to be appearing on that same stage now is “pinch yourself” kind of stuff.And with these actors, McKellen and Stewart, both of whom are major figures in their own right.What’s so wonderful about their relationship, and also their relationship with Sean [Mathias, the director], is the huge amount of respect they have for the other’s achievements and their warmth. They come across as great friends, which they are, but they’re also so supportive of one another, which in turn has been so inspiring to me.Were you nervous about joining their ranks?Sure, here I was a young actor on day one new to the production and also pretty much to [the work of] Pinter, but both of them gave me a big hug and a huge welcome, which suddenly made me feel as if I was one of them. I will be forever grateful for that, and if I’m ever in that position myself with a young actor, I hope to be able to give that person something of what I have learned from Ian and Patrick.The offer to join the production must have been irresistible.Oh, it was! An email came into my inbox saying that the production had these people in it and that there was going to be a four-week tour followed by three and a half months in the West End, and I just said, “When is the meeting?” So we read it, and I got the job and then had two and a half months to try and get myself up to a level that everyone else would be at on the first day of rehearsals.How did you manage that?I bought all of Pinter’s collected works and began working my way through the other plays: the biography of him by Michael Billington hasn’t left my side for four or five months! I also saw the Jamie Lloyd production of The Homecoming and slowly but surely began getting an idea of what his work is about.You must have come across Pinter’s writing before.We had a class at drama school about the power of silence, and I remember the teacher giving us a section from [Pinter’s 1960 masterwork] The Caretaker. I’m not sure I knew what was happening at the time, but I think I now understand what those pauses and silences mean: they are filled with such menace and doubt and fear and anger.There’s comedy in No Man’s Land, too.Very much so. You can see elements here of some of his revue sketches, which were so filthy and so funny. That’s what is so great about No Man’s Land: it’s got all of Pinter in two hours—that deep, deep sadness and also laugh-out-loud jokes, total sketch stuff and yet real menace between Foster and Briggs.You play Foster, who, along with Briggs, is in the employ of the Patrick Stewart character, Hirst, even as you both try to intimidate the Ian McKellen character, Spooner.I think of Foster and Briggs as desperate to survive. They have a wonderful life in this house, or what they believe to be a wonderful life, and with the arrival of Ian as Spooner, all that is suddenly under threat, so what happens is Foster and Briggs want to get rid of that threat; their comfort zone is punctured.On Broadway, this production ran in 2013 in repertory with Stewart and McKellen in Waiting for Godot, a play they have already done on the West End.Where I saw it! I was studying at the time and I remember the gasp in the audience when the curtain went up and the glee that I felt watching them. Yesterday, while on tour, I was watching people get off the bus in Cardiff [Wales] and they were all dressed up and there was this wonderful sense of excitement among us as actors. There’s something really thrilling about playing off the audience as if they were the fifth character in the play.And presumably audiences needn’t worry about whether they get the play: instead, they should just relax into it.The thing with Pinter and No Man’s Land in particular is that everyone is going to take something different from it. We had one woman who couldn’t take her eyes off Patrick because her own father had dementia and so for her it was a play about memory, whereas there are others who can’t stop laughing at what to them is a hilarious conversation between two drunks in Hampstead Heath. You begin to understand the unsaid in every line, in every moment.As an Irishman who grew up away from the rough-and-tumble East End where Pinter was born and raised, are you having to adjust to the language of the play?Certainly a Bethnal Green boy from east London is going to have a whole different speech rhythm to someone who grew up in Kildare, but I’ve been listening to Harold speaking and to videos of people in the East End in the 1970s. It’s also about how long the men at that time wore their sideburns and what their hair was like.So how long are your sideburns?They are so long! My trainer shouted at me a few weeks ago, “What is that on your face?” But, you know, to get to play onstage with Owen and Ian and Patrick, I’d have them this long for the rest of my life. View Commentslast_img read more

Read More →

Hot off the Press: The October Issue of Blue Ridge Outdoors

first_imgColors begin spilling down the mountains this month. Blue Ridge Outdoors talks with four photography pros who share their favorite fall foliage spots and secrets with readers. This month, we also celebrate the 50th birthday of The Wilderness Act by exploring Appalachia’s wildest public lands, and we offer the simplest, easiest way to save more of them.Readers get a sneak peek inside the backpack of A.T. record holder Jennifer Pharr Davis and a music preview of Halloween ear candy. And as BRO readers already know, play is more than just fun. It’s an essential ingredient for health, both as kids and adults. In the October issue, we review the latest scientific research showing the benefits of outdoor play. We also pick 10 off-the-radar state parks that offer adventures as epic as national parks but with far fewer crowds.featuresWILDERNESS AT 50Exploring Appalachia’s wildest public lands and The Magic Kingdom of WildernessHIDDEN TREASURESOften overshadowed by national parks, state parks offer equally epic adventures with far fewer crowds. Here are 10 off-the-radar favorites.PICTURE PERFECTFour photography pros share their favorite fall foliage spots and secrets.THE NEED TO PLAYPlay is more than just fun. It’s an essential ingredient for health, both as kids and adults.departmentsEDITOR’S NOTEThe easy way to save the planetFLASHPOINTSolar could power half of AppalachiaQUICK HITSGeorgia runner sets barefoot record/Shirtless steeplechaser stripped of gold medal/and more!THE DIRTPaddling pros share five essential skillsTHE GOODSPeek inside the backpack of A.T. record holder Jennifer Pharr DavisTRAIL MIXJudah & the Lion and their new album Kids These Dayslast_img read more

Read More →

Preliminary Meeting between Colombia and FARC

first_img Good afternoon, we are two Chilean students and we are investigating about the current situation of Colombia and how it is experiencing the conflict with the FARC today. We would like to know which is the contribution and importance of foreign countries that will participate, taking into account that they are not directly affected by a problem that is purely of Colombia.We are looking forward for your answer. Greetings. We are students of the Carampangue College of Chile and we are investigating on the subject of the present in Colombia. We are very interested in receiving an answer to the following question:How are to intervene or to participate the guarantor countries and accompanying persons in the peace process in Colombia? Why will the meeting point be held in Norway and the peace negotiations in Cuba? What could be the contribution of these nations to Colombia and FARC? How is the Colombian economy projected after achieving peace with the FARC?Hello I am Domingo. I am asking this kind of question for a project that I have to do in an elective. Please someone answer me. Thank you Delegates of the Colombian government and Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) held on November 6 a meeting to “officially prepare” the peace talks to start on November 15 in Havana, the Cuban news agency Prensa Latina reported on November 5. “FARC and Colombian Government delegates will meet in Havana on Tuesday, to formally arrange the peace talks,” stated a source from the guerrillas, quoted by Prensa Latina. The source explained that “the meeting that was previously arranged for November 5 – as agreed in Oslo, the Norwegian capital, on October 18 – was postponed for the morning of November 6,” without specifying the reasons for the postponement. Neither the Colombian Embassy, nor the FARC representatives in Havana gave further details about the meeting. The government of Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos and the FARC, formally agreed on the talks in Oslo, but the peace negotiations will be held in Havana on November 15, with a five-point agenda: the agrarian issues, guarantees of political participation, illicit drugs, disarmament, and victims. The government delegation for negotiations, which will take place without a ceasefire, is headed by former Colombian vice president Humberto de la Calle, while Iván Márquez, FARC number two, leads the guerrillas’ delegation. The peace process intends to put an end to the internal armed conflict that started half a century ago, and it will have Norway and Cuba as guarantors, while Venezuela and Chile will act as chaperones. By Dialogo November 07, 2012last_img read more

Read More →

Medford Christmas Eve Home Invasion Suspect Sought

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Suffolk County police released a sketch Wednesday of a suspect wanted for an armed home invasion in Medford on Christmas Eve.The man in the sketch knocked on the door of a Sipp Avenue home and when a resident answered the door, the suspect flashed a silver handgun and forced his way inside on Dec. 24, police said.The burglar stole cash, a laptop computer and a cellphone before fleeing the scene, police said.The suspect in the sketch was described as a black man, 25 to 30 years old, 5-feet, 9-inches to 5-feet, 10-inches tall, 180 to 200 pounds with a beard and mustache. He was wearing a baseball cap with a gray hooded sweatshirt, gray sweat pants and brown and green Timberland boots.Sixth Squad detectives ask anyone with information about this crime to call Crime Stoppers anonymously at 1-800-220-TIPS.  All calls will be kept confidential. A cash reward of up to $5,000 is being for information that leads to an arrest.last_img read more

Read More →