Comment: Managers have direct sway on staff output

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Areyou able to do what you do best every day? I suspect that footballer DavidBeckham could answer “yes” to the above. But how many people in businessgenuinely can say they are able to give of their best every day? It is animportant question because productivity, customer service, safety, staffturnover and profit are a direct consequence of getting it right. ThePentland Group, which went private late last year, is a complex set of branded businessesoperating in the sports, outdoor and fashion industry. Brands include Speedo,Ellesse, Kickers and Berghaus. Late last year we surveyed our 2,100 staff fromaround the world, asking just 12 questions based on work undertaken by theGallup organisation. We achieved an 82 per cent response rate – a clear mandatefor us to act on the results.Thestatements put to staff to agree with included, “I know what is expected of meat work”, “At work, I have the opportunity to do what I do best every day”, “Inthe last seven days I have received recognition or praise for doing good work”and “My manager, or someone at work, seems to care about me as a person”. It isimportant to check whether managers know what the people element of their rolereally is because research suggests they massively influence how productivepeople are. Havinggrown mainly by acquisition, each brand in Pentland has a slightly differentculture and a separate profit and loss account. A thread that runs through thewhole group, however, is one based on family values and simplicity. We have nograding scheme and we try to treat people like individuals. Thusactions resulting from the statement, “I know what is expected of me” whilebeing critical to productivity does not need to look the same everywhere. Weare not hung up on this being written on an identical performance managementsheet – but are interested in making sure line managers have sensibleconversations about it that are recorded. Thegroup learnt a great deal about its businesses around the world from thefeedback process. We now have hard data on where there is excellent practiceand we know where we have to focus attention on people management issues. Wealso have hard data on what we all knew – that soft skills are hugely relevantto productive outcomes and to making more money. Thesurvey results give us real ammunition to get across the fact that resources atwork are actually human beings – all of whom have unique needs and differences.Thegroup can now give direct and realistic feedback to managers on what theirpeople say they need from them, with shared actions, and can put much moreemphasis on what people are good at, rather than trying to fix thebehaviourally unfixable. www.pentland.com www.henleymc.ac.uk www.gallup.com ByChris Matchan, group HR director for the Pentland Group and steering committeemember of the Henley Forum on HR Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Comment: Managers have direct sway on staff outputOn 20 Mar 2001 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

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Take part in our pay forecast research

first_imgRelated posts: Features list 2021 – submitting content to Personnel TodayOn this page you will find details of how to submit content to Personnel Today. We do not publish a… Pay award levels recorded by XpertHR have been low for the best part of seven years now, but is this about to change?In early 2009 employees felt the full force of recession when the value of their annual pay rises plummeted – from around 3% to 3.5% in the years preceding the recession, to more than half of organisations freezing pay rates in the middle of 2009.Pay awards: tools and resourcesLatest pay awardsBenchmarking pay and benefitsSalary surveysThose conducting pay reviews at this time were struggling to manage increases of more than 1%.Fast forward seven years and pay awards have yet to fully recover.The latest data from XpertHR, based on the three months to the end of July 2015, reveals that pay awards across all organisations are now typically worth 2%.Further analysis reveals that the private sector mirrors the whole economy figure of 2%, while public-sector employers have made pay awards at the 1.6% mark over the past year (a figure boosted by higher increases for the lowest paid; and a 10.3% increase for MPs).Given the stability in pay setting at present – the XpertHR median has been at, or close to 2%, for much of the past five years – can we expect more of the same over the coming year?XpertHR is investigating employer’s pay plans for the year ahead, including at what level they expect to increase pay for employees.Take part in our pay forecast research here and you will receive a free copy of the findings. Comments are closed. center_img Previous Article Next Article Take part in our pay forecast researchBy Sheila Attwood on 21 Aug 2015 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

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Circumpolar projections of Antarctic krill growth potential

first_imgAntarctic krill is a key species of important Southern Ocean food webs, yet how changes in ocean temperature and primary production may impact their habitat quality remains poorly understood. We provide a circumpolar assessment of the robustness of krill growth habitat to climate change by coupling an empirical krill growth model with projections from a weighted subset of IPCC Earth system models. We find that 85% of the study area experienced only a moderate change in relative gross growth potential (± 20%) by 2100. However, a temporal shift in seasonal timings of habitat quality may cause disjunctions between krill’s biological timings and the future environment. Regions likely to experience habitat quality decline or retreat are concentrated near the northern limits of krill distribution and in the Amundsen–Bellingshausen seas region during autumn, meaning habitat will likely shift to higher latitudes in these areas.last_img read more

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London agent starts Airbnb letting service for landlords

first_imgHome » News » Agencies & People » London agent starts Airbnb letting service for landlords previous nextAgencies & PeopleLondon agent starts Airbnb letting service for landlordsPortico says nearly 50,000 people now ‘host’ in the capitalNigel Lewis13th February 201702,051 Views Eighteen-branch London agent Portico has launched an Airbnb letting management service specifically for landlords as the number of hosts in the city approaches the 50,000 mark.Managing director Robert Nichols (pictured) says that despite the 90-day limit introduced by the San Francisco-based company, even “seasoned landlords are coming round to the fact that a combination of Airbnb and traditional tenancy will maximise their return on investment,” he says.Portico, which was launched in 2015 and replaced existing brands Edmund Cude and Bushells, says there are now 48,017 active Airbnb hosts in London and that the average two-bedroom flat there generates £2,226 a month based on a 70% occupancy rates.Portico claims its service will be able to achieve even higher occupancy rates for clients of up to 80%, and that landlords can expect to receive a booking within a week of listing on the site.Average day rates for Airbnb properties in London range from £65 a day in Bexley to £224 a day in Westminster.Portico is stepping into controversial waters – many agents and city housing professionals see Airbnb as a threat to supply within the existing private rental market, and several councils including Westminster have made their dislike of the website known.Portico is also keen to highlight the price difference between Airbnb ‘hosting’ and traditional renting. Its research points to the former being £449 a month higher on average than longer-term lets.“If your property becomes vacant in the quieter months, we recommend listing [a landlord’s] property on Airbnb and synchronising [their] tenancy to start a long-term let in the summer or late summer when demand from tenants and therefore prices are highest.” says Robert Nichols.“It really does pay to get on board with Airbnb in the short-term.”Read more about the Portico’s new service.Portico Robert Nichols London airbnb February 13, 2017Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021last_img read more

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Refudiate this

first_imgOxford University Press has named “refudiate” Word of the Year 2010, a spelling blunder made by Sarah Palin on her Twitter profile earlier this year.In July, Palin encouraged “peaceful Muslims” to “refudiate” plans for a Ground Zero mosque. She was subsequently mocked by political opponents and the media, to which she retorted, “English is a living language. Shakespeare liked to coin new words too”. Described as a fusion of the words ‘refute’ and ‘repudiate’, OUP said the word suggested “a general sense of ‘reject’”. Senior Lexicographer Christine Lindberg described Palin’s word as a “time capsule” of the past year.In 2009, the award went to “unfriend” and other contenders included “vuvuzela”, “gleek” and “nom nom”.last_img read more

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Pembroke tutor returns to work following death of student

first_imgOxford University has confirmed that a Pembroke tutor whose employment was ‘terminated’ following the suicide of a BPhil student has been reinstated. Dr Jeffrey Ketland won his job back following a successful appeal.Ketland was suspended after an inquest into the death of student Charlotte Coursier heard that he sent her “crazy and rambling emails”. The pair had become romantically involved after meeting at Edinburgh University but ended the affair before they moved to Oxford. She then began a relationship with Ben Fardell. Coursier later reported Ketland to Thames Valley Police, who issued him with a warning under the Harassment Act on May 22. During the inquest Fardell described Ketland’s treatment of her as “abuse” that “made an already fragile girl even worse.” Coursier’s body was found by her housemates at her home in East Oxford on 10th June.Coroner Darren Salter concluded that it was “clear from the evidence that Miss Coursier had previous mental health problems and had suffered from depression, [including] suicide attempts by overdose. She also had suicidal thoughts in 2012, according to her GP.” He added, “the main factor in Miss Coursier’s death appeared to be her break-up with Mr Fardell.”Salter noted that following the warning there was no further contact between Coursier and Ketland and “Miss Coursier believed the situation with him had been remedied.” He also confirmed that Ketland tried to alert the police to his fears for her wellbeing.The University came under fire in the aftermath of the inquest for its handling of Coursier’s complaint, having allegedly told her “not to go to the faculty on days when he was lecturing” rather than immediately suspending Ketland.Anna Bradshaw, OUSU VP for Women, told Cherwell, “OUSU is working with the University to bring in a revised university harassment policy in Michaelmas Term. Hopefully, this policy will make the procedure around complaints of harassment much clearer. This does not, of course, alleviate the frustration of many students in this case, but I believe that the new policy will help to prevent this sort of disappointment in future.”Ketland first met Coursier in 2008 when he was working at Edinburgh University. In February 2009 she overdosed on paracetamol and he took her to A&E. The next month she sent him a birthday card saying, “Thank you for everything you’ve done for me, I wouldn’t be here today if it wasn’t for you. You have been a wonderful friend.”In Autumn 2010 Ketland started an affair with Coursier. It ended after a few weeks when he called police, saying she had assaulted him. In November 2011 he applied for a job at Oxford; Coursier subsequently applied to study there. He said he was so concerned she was stalking him that he became ill and needed treatment for stress.Speaking of the University’s enquiries earlier this year, Ketland said, “the prosecution ignored my evidence, detailed email documentation, a police incident note concerning an assault against me, application records, and eleven witness statements, covering the period November 2008 up to the present. As of mid-April 2014, I am terminated from Oxford. The reasons stated amount to this: that I told a student to stay away from me and then responded to her refusal to do so; that I pointed out to a witness at Oxford her harassment of me while it was happening; and that I complained to Oxford of false allegations being made against me.”Jacob Williamson, a former Philosophy student, told Cherwell, “We know the University conducted a review, but students were informed neither of its precise nature nor its findings. We also know there was later a termination or suspension of some kind, but students were not directly informed of this and we do not know the reasons for it. It is sadly unsurprising, then, that the details of the successful appeal are equally opaque. At no point has justice been seen to be done.”In response, a spokesperson for the University said, “The University does not normally comment on matters pertaining to individual employees for reasons of confidentiality.“The University has acted with care and in good faith throughout.”last_img read more

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HSPH faculty, alumni reflect on progress one year after Haitian earthquake

first_imgHSPH’s Michael VanRooyen, director of the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative, spoke to the Harvard Gazette about HHI’s response over the past year to the January 12, 2010 earthquake in Haiti, which included a joint effort with Brigham and Women’s Hospital to manage a temporary field hospital on the border of the Dominican Republic and Haiti. The facility launched within 48 hours of the disaster and treated 2,000 patients before closing in May. To continue meeting the needs of rehabilitating patients and of Haitians living in a nearby displaced persons camp, HHI-led personnel opened Klinik Lespwa (Clinic of Hope), which transitioned to Haitian staff in November. This hands-on involvement expanded HHI’s traditional academic role, VanRooyen told the Gazette. Going forward, HHI will resume a research-based role in post-earthquake recovery and will continue to provide consultation to frontline organizations.The Gazette article also quotes Joia Mukherjee, M.P.H. ’01, and David Walton, M.P.H. ’07, both members of the Harvard Medical School faculty and physicians at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital, on the slow pace of recovery efforts.  They are working in Haiti with Partners In Health, a not-for-profit Harvard affiliate which has had a presence in Haiti since 1985. It was co-founded by Paul Farmer, the Maude and Lillian Presley Professor of Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School and professor in the Department of Global Health and Population at HSPH.last_img read more

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On the Blogs: The Rising Market in Electricity Storage

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享WamstedOnEnergy.com:Electric utility executives already fretting about slow/no growth in their service territories have another item to add to their growing list of worries: the prospect that many of their commercial customers could begin installing behind-the-meter storage to lower their demand charges.A recent white paper from DOE’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the Clean Energy Group, a nonprofit advocacy organization, shows that it could be economic for almost 28 percent of commercial customers across the country to install batteries at their business sites to cut their electricity consumption during specific periods of the day, thereby reducing their exposure to utility-imposed demand charges. This would amount to a one-two punch for utilities: electricity sales would drop if the batteries were linked with solar and the amount of revenue collected from these charges would fall, not a pretty picture for the utility industry.The analysis, “Identifying Potential Markets for Behind-the-Meter Battery Energy Storage: A Survey of U.S. Demand Charges,” does not look at actual rates being paid by commercial customers (the hours involved in collecting that data would almost certainly be cost prohibitive) but rather surveyed 10,000 utility tariffs on file across the country, developed representative load profiles for 10 different building types, and then examined which tariff(s) could be used by the differing buildings. A full discussion of the methodology is including in the study, which can be found here. Once that overall sorting was done, NREL examined the fraction of the overall universe of commercial buildings that could be using tariffs above a threshold of $15 per kilowatt, a commonly used marker for the cost effectiveness of battery storage.The results were eye-opening. According to NREL, roughly five million commercial customers are eligible for electric tariffs with a demand charge rate of at least $15 per kilowatt—more than a quarter of the 18 million commercial customers in the U.S. Interestingly, the study also found that there are opportunities for this battery-enabled defection in almost every state. California and New York, which have been early and consistent supporters of energy storage initiatives, top the list with the most commercial customers that could be paying demand charges of more than $15 per kilowatt. But as the graphic below demonstrates, the opportunities are spread across the country. Georgia, for example, which is not generally thought of as a high-cost region, is third on the list, with some 237,000 commercial customers potentially paying demand charges above the $15 per kilowatt threshold.Raising the threshold to $20 per kilowatt would lower the number of potential customers for battery storage to three million, but this still represents a sizable market opportunity that should be worrisome to utility executives nationwide. Given the recent significant price declines in battery costs, looking at a threshold of $10 per kilowatt may be more representative of where the market is heading; in this case, NREL said, six million commercial customers potentially could benefit by looking for a battery storage option to cut their utility demand charge. The study’s authors also noted that if storage costs fall to those levels, it “may alter the bulk power system sufficiently to prompt a reduction in demand charge rates.”How this will play out is clearly uncertain, but it cannot be good news for the utility industry, which has been troubled for years by flat demand growth. As the Energy Information Administration reported this summer, overall residential electricity sales have dropped 3 percent since 2010 while per capita sales have dropped 7 percent in the same period. (see charts below). The situation is much the same in the commercial and industrial sectors: Looking back to 2007 (before the great recession), sales in both segments are essentially flat as the second chart below illustrates.More: Storage Puts Utilities on a Big Bind on Demand Charges On the Blogs: The Rising Market in Electricity Storagelast_img read more

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You can’t manage what you don’t measure: Part three

first_img 6SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Buddy Kittle Buddy Kittle is the Co-Founder of Banker’s Mortgage Consulting, LLC. He began his mortgage banking career in 1993 as a Mortgage Loan Officer and later promoted to producing manager … Web: bankersmortgageconsulting.com Details This being the final article of a three part series I encourage you to read part one and part two. The purpose of sharing this specific outline is to improve the borrower experience, increase profitability and gain additional market share in mortgage lending.Observations:Most of us are familiar with the saying “work on your business not in your business”, I have to wonder if this saying was created by a mortgage professional? It is very easy for the mortgage manager to be consumed in day to day activity thus not working on the growth of their department.We realize that the mortgage manager either has difficulty delegating or doesn’t have the appropriate staff in place to execute properly. It is important for senior management to recognize this and make corrective actions to assist the mortgage manager for the success of the entire department.This is a common occurrence we observe during site visits. Normally there are production goals set by the manager and senior management and over the last years of low rates the goals may have been met or exceeded. With the inevitable increase of interest rates on the horizon mortgage managers need to be working on their business to develop new strategies to increase loan volume, reduce time from application to clear to close and increase profitability.Solutions:The key component to develop more business in a rising rate environment is reducing the time from application to clear to close. If you are approving loans faster than your peer group then referrals will increase from industry partners. There is a book titled “It’s Not the Big that Eat the Small, It’s the Fast that Eat the Slow”, this title certainly applies to mortgage lending.The mortgage manager has to focus on the efficiencies of their operation. To be efficient they have to measure every step of the operation. Loan officers, processors, underwriters and loan closers should have report cards that track the performance of each position. When implemented properly reports can be generated that give live time overviews of status of each loan and the entire departments performance.Recently I visited with a CEO and asked them how they measured the efficiency of their mortgage operation. He stated “I receive reports at the end of the month that tell me how long it took to close loans, how much volume was closed and our gain on sale for the month”. Measuring performance after the loan has closed is similar to driving to Florida and then checking map quest or your GPS to make sure you took the best route.Mortgage managers have a very difficult job managing a business that has so many variables. Loan origination systems (LOS) that deliver great reports, track status of each loan and number of team member touches is the start to realizing where there is room for improvement. The mortgage manager must be monitoring performance of the sales and support staff on a daily basis with these reports.It is necessary that the senior management allow the mortgage manager to manage the operation. They should make sure they are properly staffed and have strategic plans in place for long and short term growth. Additionally, there should be an implementation timeline that parallels the strategic plan. Frequent meetings should be scheduled to review the progress of the plan and implementation and to see if adjustments need to be made based on a fast changing industry. We find that operations that include their staff in positive meetings to review current processes and discuss new ideas on how to improve the workflow gives them a feeling of ownership thus motivating them to perform at a higher level.Review:There is nothing easy when your goal is be become the best mortgage operation in your area however it can be done with a clear vision, strategic planning and accountability of everyone in the department.As mentioned in the previous articles the CEO and/or senior management have to embrace the business model and let everyone know they are supporting the new changes for success. The success or failure has a lot to do with senior management vocalizing to the team members their support.The following points need to be considered when building a successful operation:Proper education, educate, empower and hold accountable your team membersStrategic plan with implementation timelinesFrequent meetings to review current workflows and technology for improvement with entire departmentProper procedures and workflows understood by all team membersRobust LOS set up correctlyGreat dashboard reporting to view status daily of the departmentTracking the KPIs of each team members position and operation for efficiencyA manager that delegates and manages the operation as opposed to working in the businessSenior management/CEO vocalizing their support of the business model to the entire departmentThis is just a very short list that will help you take your department to the next level. Once again the statement below says it all:“You can’t manage what you don’t measure, to be brief measure, monitor and manage”!I wish you the best of success and if you need further assistance give us a call or email.last_img read more

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Survey for private renters on the impact of the Corona virus on business

first_imgYou can fill out the survey until 14.07.2020. You can access the survey via the link https://www.hgk.hr/forms/anketni-upitnik-poslovanje-obiteljskog-smjestaja-u-vrijeme-koronavirusa  The Family Tourism Association of the Croatian Chamber of Commerce has published a survey for private renters on the impact of the Corona virus on their business.center_img The survey aims to gain insight into how the current situation regarding the Corona virus (COVID-19) affects the non-business of catering service providers in the household and on the family farm.last_img read more

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