Young adults, youth leave mark on General Convention

first_img This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Bath, NC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Comments are closed. General Convention, Submit an Event Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Alexandra Heeter says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY July 16, 2012 at 6:04 pm I have always enjoyed how my church makes an effort to treat youth as real human beings with valid thoughts and real faith, and not as some kind of strange youth-creature. I hated being called a youth as a teenager because I felt that I wasn’t being treated as an individual, but rather as a label, or as a representative of anyone who was born in the early 1990’s. I believed, and still believe that my age, gender, race, etc. do not offer any insight into who I am as a Christian, which is what should really matter. As I entered my late teens, I grudgingly conceded that I was a youth, and that being a minor would have an effect on my participation if any legal decisions were made.Now, I’m 21, and I still don’t want to have the “youth” label. At the parish I go to when I’m at school, I participate in the adult forum. Most of the other regular participants are 30 years older than I am, and we appreciate the different perspectives that every individual brings. It is a great experience, and I don’t feel isolated or singled out. When I come home, however, many people still see me as a youth. They see me infrequently enough that I can’t really blame them, but sometimes I feel like they are so concentrated on the image of “The Youth” that they haven’t noticed that I have grown up. I make my own decisions, live most of the year away from home, and have 20 years of experience in the Episcopal Church. When I pick a church, I won’t be looking for other “millenials,” I’ll be looking for people who are open and loving, whatever their age and whatever my age. Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Events General Convention 2012, Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Belleville, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Press Release Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC July 11, 2012 at 10:31 am Thank you for covering this. I do wonder, though, what message we are sending when we lump youth and young adults in the same group.I think one of the issues we have as a congregation, and one reason we have trouble retaining folks in their 20’s, is that we do view them as an extension of youth group rather than as part of the elders of the church. They’re already running businesses, starting non-profits, and establishing service programs. Given that (to take one example) the founders of Kiva were in their 20’s, it seems strange to keep people up to 30 in this limbo where they need to learn the ropes.Laura Toepfer Allison Melendez says: By Sharon SheridanPosted Jul 10, 2012 Laura Toepfer says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Tampa, FL center_img Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments (3) TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Knoxville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Tags Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Youth & Young Adults Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Young adults, youth leave mark on General Convention Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY July 12, 2012 at 1:08 pm I was at Convention with the Young Adult Festival this year and yes, being lumped with the youth for some people was a minor problem, but for the most part we all had the same opinion on issues and so the combination of Young Adults and Official Youth Presence was not a problem. All events were optional so you could attend the official Young Adult events or do your own things, but this gave us a way to talk about the church and what we wanted the church to be. It gave us a group of people to get together with and form connections and friendships with where as if we had simply attended as visitors we might have spent the entire time in the events hall.I see the problems of combining adults who are married with careers with people still in high school, but the main idea is that we are all still in the church and still have opinions. We are all members of the church, no matter how young. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Music Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Press Release Service Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Martinsville, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Young Adult Festival participants discuss the day’s legislation during a debriefing with Mary Getz, grassroots and online communications coordinator at the Episcopal Church Office of Government Relations in Washington, D.C. Photo/Sharon Sheridan[Episcopal News Service — Indianapolis] “You haven’t heard of Bonnie Ball?”The teens rushed to pull up a website on a cell phone to show General Convention House of Deputies President Bonnie Anderson how those addressing the house were earning points in an online game for such behavior as trying to speak to the same issue more than once (2 points), wearing something strange on their heads while speaking (5 points) or mentioning Bonnie Ball while addressing the chair (15 points).“That is so fun,” Anderson said. “Did you see the guy with the lobster claw [hat]? … Maybe I could borrow it.”Anderson spent her lunch break July 9 eating pizza and chatting about serious and not-so-serious matters with the members of the Official Youth Presence. Anderson wrote the resolution in 1982 that created the presence, composed of 18 young people — two per province — who have voice but no vote in the House of Deputies.Youth and young adults have been a visible presence in Indianapolis, gathering in official groups and unofficial networks to participate in and observe the workings of General Convention.During the lunch, the teens asked Anderson about how she handled the hectic convention schedule (she admitted to sleeping through her alarm one morning for the first time since college) and commented on her patience in the house.“I have three promises I made to myself: Be patient, be polite, be professional,” she told them. Another good tip: “Breathe in, breathe out, smile. It works pretty well.”When one of the youth said that convention remained confusing sometimes, Anderson commented, “It’s hard when you’re tracking something to stop doing that and turn at the drop of a hat and do something else.”And events can surprise her, too, she admitted. When expected Spanish translations weren’t available during that morning’s session, she said, “I was really thrown for a loop.”Marlene Rodriguez Hernandez of the Diocese of Puerto Rico and Cole Mayer of the Diocese of South Dakota, the youths’ designated journalists, interviewed Anderson for a video segment on the group’s blog. They asked about youth representation on the Joint Nominating Committee for the Election of the Presiding Bishop, her thoughts about the youth presence, her impending retirement and her favorite part of General Convention.Official Youth Presence members Marlene Rodriguez Hernandez of the Diocese of Puerto Rico and Cole Mayer of the Diocese of South Dakota interview House of Deputies President Bonnie Anderson for a video segment on the group’s blog. Photo/Sharon SheridanReflecting afterward on how the youth program had developed over the years, Anderson said she was impressed by the teens’ vitality, enthusiasm and commitment to knowing what was happening and participating in convention. “It’s just an inspiration to me. They are just the best.”The teens seemed to enjoy spending time with her as well.“I think she’s wonderful,” said Emma Grundhauser, 16, of the Diocese of Minnesota. “”You can tell she has a passion for youth ministry.”Young ‘millennials’The night before, young adults from throughout convention — including young deputies and members of the Young Adult Festival — gathered in the festival’s meeting room at the Hilton before the group’s nightly debriefing and compline.The gathering followed the formation of a Facebook group for young adults and young deputies to General Convention by the Rev. Megan Castellan, 29, deputy of the Diocese of Arizona, after the draft budget came out. At the July 8 meeting, they discussed why they were Episcopalians and how they had felt empowered or connected at convention.“It’s important to name why you’re part of the church, especially when the church seems ambivalent about your presence,” she said.The list of “Why Am I Episco-Crazy” included: “because I was born here BUT my parents got it right”; “because I had a voice”; “because of Scripture, tradition and reason, and the conversation doesn’t end there”; “because of the common Communion cup.”Castellan said she hoped the group would form an online community via listserv, Twitter feed or Facebook group to stay connected after convention. “Young Episcopalians don’t know each other. You go to a church, and you’re the only person under 50, and it can be an incredibly isolating experience.”Castellan said she’d belonged to a similar Generation X network in the church. “It’s a really vibrant listserv.”But, she said, “There’s a huge difference between Gen X and millennials” and even between herself and the younger millennials she works with as a campus minister.“They’ve always grown up in a post-Christendom world,” she said. “Their perception on why you would go to church is generally very different than when I ask older parishioners.”Young Adult FestivalSponsored by the Episcopal Church’s Young Adult and Campus Ministries, the festival provides a mentored opportunity for 18- though 30-year-olds to attend the convention.“It’s just empowering them to be a part of this and helping them to advocate for their presence and advocate for what they’re passionate about,” said Jason Sierra, church officer for young adult leadership and vocations. The festival offers workshops on Episcopal polity and convention, helps participants track legislation and provides opportunities for fellowship and worship.“It’s an unofficial presence of General Convention,” he said.This year’s convention has 22 young adult deputies and 95 festival participants, including large groups from the dioceses of Arkansas, Newark, Atlanta and Los Angeles, Sierra said. In a new initiative, 23 young adults are interning with organizations at convention such as Integrity, the Episcopal Peace Fellowship, the Chicago Consultation, Episcopal Camp and Conference Centers, American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem and Episcopal Relief & Development plus the Episcopal Church Women, he said.The festival gives young adults a way to engage in convention — some have testified at hearings, for example. And they can participate as much or as little in festival events as they wish.“They enjoy the flexibility, but they need this jumping off point,” Sierra said.Making connectionsYouth and young adults gave a thumbs up to their convention experiences.At the young millennials meeting, Steven Duvoisin of the Diocese of Nebraska said he enjoyed hearing the many stories people shared “about the positive empowering experiences they’re having within the church.”“I think as young adults it’s easy to get discouraged and feel isolated and focus on the negatives when there’s actually a lot of good things going on and a lot of God things going on,” said Duvoisin, who was helping staff the Tri-Faith Foundation booth in the exhibit hall.Also from Nebraska, Michael Heller, 28, attended convention as a volunteer, serving as a legislative aide in the structure committee. “I wanted to see how the church works on this level,” he said. “It’s been interesting to work with another legislative aide who is much older. That sort of intergenerational work has been a great experience. There needs to be more of that at General Convention.”Rachel O’Connell, right, a Young Adult Festival participant from the Diocese of Los Angeles, discusses the Episcopal Service Corps with Executive Director Amity Carrubba. Photo/Sharon SheridanRachel O’Connell, attending convention as part of the festival, spent time learning about the Episcopal Service Corps from Executive Director Amity Carrubba.Convention has been “a wonderful experience, other than the ridiculous heat,” said O’Connell, 26. “I haven’t felt segregated or singled out [as a young adult] by any means.”A client service manager for a software company in Newport Beach, California, she said she seriously was considering participating in the service corps. “I think my life would be better suited in service than it is in software.”Back at the youth presence lunch, Grace Steele, 16, of the Diocese of Long Island found convention gave her a chance to brush up on her Spanish.“I thought it would be a really good, interesting experience to meet youth from all across the church, especially Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic.”Hernandez, 17, said she wanted to see whether there are differences between Episcopalians in the states and those in her native Puerto Rico. While the language is different, she found, “we’re all part of the same family.”She also wanted to experience the legislative workings of convention, she said. “It’s a connection between politics and the church.”“It’s really interesting how we do business as Episcopalians,” said Mayer, 17. “Just being in a group with thousands of Episcopalians is pretty fun and exciting.”— Sharon Sheridan is a member of the Episcopal News Service team at General Convention. Rector Collierville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Cathedral Dean Boise, ID last_img read more

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TEXAS: Diocese approves transfer of hospital

first_img Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Belleville, IL Peter Salmon says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Collierville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Rev. Harriet B. Linville says: April 19, 2013 at 6:37 pm Will the employees have any changes in their personal health plans regarding contraception and abortion issues? Featured Events Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN Fr. Sidney Breese says: Rector Bath, NC April 24, 2013 at 7:15 pm Health insurance is a major expense for our small parish. I’ve thought for a long time that we could all save money if the national church established a nation-wide plan to cover all employees. I’ve been looking forward to the results of the decision to implement such a program in June. I understood that it was mandatory for all dioceses. How then can Texas take a different road? And how will that affect premiums for the rest of us? Les Singleton says: April 26, 2013 at 12:26 am This is an unsettling development and one wonders what will happen to our St. Luke’s in Kansas City, MO. The Episcopal Church has had a long standing presence in health care for many years. And this ministry has been appreciated by our society. The Diocese of Utah sold out some years ago and has used the monies to fund ministry in the diocese. Other dioceses have also sold out to other providers. It is very tempting when you have a very valuable asset, to sell it the the highest bidder. But I really think that we need to look at our priorities. Selling health care assets may seem like a way to raise funds for other ministries, but our presence in this ministry is different than other religious organizations. CHI has an agenda which is not in keeping with our values and in the end we will loose our control over those values. I would hope and pray that the diocese and Bishop would rethink this decision and come to a more compassionate and value driven decision. I realize that billions of dollars are at stake, but a peculiar moral compass in our society is also at stake. Comments are closed. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH By EDOT staff Posted Apr 19, 2013 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate Diocese of Nebraska New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ TEXAS: Diocese approves transfer of hospital $1 billion health foundation to be established The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Job Listing TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab center_img Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Albany, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Tags The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Grace Burson says: [Diocese of Texas] The Episcopal Diocese of Texas approved today a definitive agreement for the transfer of St. Luke’s Episcopal Health System to Catholic Health Initiatives, a nationally recognized health care system.As part of the transfer of St. Luke’s, CHI will contribute more than $1 billion to create a new Episcopal Health Foundation, which will focus on the unmet health needs of the area’s underserved population.  In addition, CHI has committed an additional $1 billion for future investment in the health system. The Rt. Rev. C. Andrew Doyle, bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Texas, said in announcing the decision, “We are humbled to be able to preserve the legacy of St. Luke’s, while also expanding the Diocesan commitment to health care.”The name of the system will be the St. Luke’s Health System.  The transaction is expected to be completed early this summer, subject to obtaining required regulatory approvals. The agreement includes the entire Health System: the Texas Medical Center campus, as well as suburban hospital locations in The Woodlands, Sugar Land, Pasadena and The Vintage.  CHI has committed to maintain all current physician models and all employees will continue to be employed by St. Luke’s.  In addition, CHI will continue to grow and enhance St. Luke’s significant affiliations with Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Heart® Institute, Kelsey-Seybold Clinic, Texas Children’s Hospital and MD Anderson Cancer Center.The 11-month evaluation process undertaken by the St. Luke’s Episcopal Health System Board included 30 prospective local and national partners with multiple strategic alternatives and, in March, this list was narrowed to three well-qualified finalists.   “We are enormously grateful to all participants for their earnest and forthright effort throughout this process,” said The Rt. Rev. Dena A. Harrison, bishop suffragan and chair of the St. Luke’s Episcopal Health System Board.CHI became the choice because it brings many benefits to the community:CHI operates across the continuum of care that is so key to the new model in American health care delivery.CHI brings cultural compatibility with the St. Luke’s brand of Faithful, Loving Care®.CHI values the people who made St. Luke’s what it is today: our patients, our physicians, our employees, our affiliates, our management, our donors and our Board leadership.“The relationship with Catholic Health Initiatives ensures the Greater Houston area will retain one of its great healthcare institutions, while best preparing St. Luke’s to meet future changes in healthcare,” said Kevin Lofton, CHI president and CEO.While this decision means the Episcopal Diocese of Texas will no longer provide acute care, the Diocese remains committed to its health care mission through the new Episcopal Health Foundation.“This new foundation will address a widening gap in healthcare throughout our 57-county area,” Doyle said.  “There is a care vacuum that must be addressed, including access to health care, prevention, community and environmental health, poverty, education and health disparities,” he said, adding, “This direction reflects the initial vision of Bishops Quin and Hines in founding St. Luke’s.  They called upon ‘all the mountain-moving powers of faith and prayer and human skill which can be brought to bear on individuals in need.’” Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release April 20, 2013 at 1:20 am my question also. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Comments (6) Health & Healthcare Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC April 22, 2013 at 2:48 pm A very sad day. There is no doubt that this a blow to the rights of women who are employees and who are patients. The Very Rev. Stuart Schadt says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA April 23, 2013 at 9:33 am My thoughts exactly. Press Release Service Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Youth Minister Lorton, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, MElast_img read more

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Pakistan: Open-air services bring healing to Peshawar Christians

first_imgPakistan: Open-air services bring healing to Peshawar Christians Submit a Job Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Albany, NY Comments (1) Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit an Event Listing Featured Jobs & Calls Press Release Service Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Tampa, FL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Comments are closed. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI September 11, 2013 at 2:32 pm Good story ! To God be the glory! Posted Sep 3, 2013 Rector Hopkinsville, KY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Bath, NC Rector Belleville, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Press Release Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Asia Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Collierville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Events The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Anglican Communion, Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC [Diocese of Peshawar’s The Frontier News] The healing ministry of the Diocese of Peshawar in Pakistan organized an open-air two-day healing services program at St. John’s Cathedral Church lawn at the end of August.These healing services were jointly organized by the Rev. Samson Anwar, who is in charge of the diocese’s healing ministry, and Pastor Anwar Fazal from Isaac TV, Lahore.The basic theme of the program was taken from the parable of the courageous woman, a widow who kept on seeking justice from an unjust judge. Eventually her resistance against injustice, her hope, and waiting meant she was rewarded with justice (Luke 18:1-8).The priests during the healing services encouraged people to keep on praying continuously, saying, “Jesus assures his followers that God will do justice in the end.”Hundreds of people attended the services; large crowds of the faithful came from all over the province to hear the word of God.A good number of non-Christians were there as well, seeking His blessings and were looking forward to receive healings, and to witness the miracles in the Holy name of Jesus Christ.Anwar and Fazal, along with other priests of the Peshawar diocese, prayed constantly for the sick, disabled, and for people possessed with demons and evil spirits. Religious songs and hymns were sung with great conviction and commitment. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Tags Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Fr. Michael Neal says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GAlast_img read more

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St. Michael’s calls Katharine G. Flexer as new rector

first_img Press Release Service Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Posted Aug 21, 2014 August 22, 2014 at 11:22 am In this section the church seems to follow a secular and corporate business perspective on which appointments or calls are worthy of note. One can understand the announcements of the nomination or election to the episcopate, perhaps, but is a call to a large or historic parish in and of itself truly more important, more news worthy, more deserving of recognition than all the other calls made in God’s Name to devoted clergy and laypersons to serve God’s people? I think not. “People” needs to list all calls within the church or none, in my humble opinion. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ August 24, 2014 at 12:48 am Kate, this is good news. We hope you and your family find this a rich mix of your gifts and the parish’s mission. Bless you all!Alda and Donn Curate Diocese of Nebraska Mary J. Miller says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Mary Frances Schjonberg says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME August 22, 2014 at 11:48 am ENS accepts any such call information that is submitted. There is no central repository of all calls available to ENS and from which we could cull such information. We hope that any Episcopal congregation with a change in leadership will upload that announcement here https://www.episcopalnewsservice.org/upload-a-move/ After a simple moderation step, the announcement will be posted to the People section. At the congregation level, ENS tends to publish ordained leadership calls. A look at recent People stories will show we also welcome announcements about lay leaders. Alda Morgan says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Bath, NC Featured Jobs & Calls The Rev. Harriet B. Linville says: Rector Albany, NY August 21, 2014 at 8:54 pm Blessings for you and your family with your new call. ECR and ECA will miss you. Tags August 22, 2014 at 2:16 am What a wonderful and exciting call. Sorry not to have run into you while you were here in California again. Blessings for suck an exciting opportunity! Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Washington, DC April 14, 2015 at 2:22 pm It has taken me almost half a year to reach out to you and congratulate you on your appointment. You were so very helpful to me at St. Clements when I was in such despair after losing several cats to various forms of feline cancer. S.t Michael’s is very fortunate to have you compassionate pastoral care. Peace be with you always. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit an Event Listing Submit a Press Release Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 St. Michael’s Episcopal Church, which has occupied the same location on Manhattan’s Upper West Side since its founding in 1807, has called the Rev. Katharine G. Flexer to be its 11th Rector — the first woman to hold the position.Flexer is a native of the Seattle area and a former associate rector at St. Michael’s. Since 2011 she has been Rector of the Episcopal Church in Almaden (ECA) in San Jose, California.“St. Michael’s became a part of me when I was there,” Flexer said. “I hope to increase the church’s presence in the neighborhood. Our mission is to serve God in the community.”“Kate’s shining qualities as a priest and as a person were uppermost in our minds as we made this decision,” said Michael Smith, one of the wardens of the parish. “But it has not escaped our notice that we have also made a bit of very pleasing history in calling the parish’s first woman Rector.”The appointment followed an extended search that drew applicants from across the U.S. and abroad.Flexer is joined by her husband Jim Hinch, a journalist who covers religion for the Orange County Register and other publications, and their children Frances and Benjamin, who were born in New York City during the family’s earlier stint at St. Michael’s.Flexer is an avid runner who has twice completed the Boston Marathon. She and her family share a passion for hiking and camping in the backwoods.Flexer graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Whitman College in Walla Walla, Washington, with her junior year abroad at Strasbourg University in France. She earned a master of divinity degree from the Church Divinity School of the Pacific in Berkeley, California, and took part in a postgraduate study exchange at Ripon College Cuddesdon in Oxford.Flexer is known for her gifts as a preacher, pastor and educator, with a special talent for bringing the next generation into parish life – from children to young adults. For three summers she has co-led the Family Camp of the Diocese of California.At St. Michael’s, Flexer helped create a successful Sunday evening service to engage the unchurched, the lapsed and anybody who prefers an alternative style of worship.In Almaden, Flexer led a drive to engage her congregation in the life of the community beyond the church walls, using the tools of broad-based community organizing. Working with a local organizer from the Industrial Areas Foundation (IAF) and other colleagues in the area, ECA began to deepen relationships and develop leadership in the congregation while building connections with other institutions around common interests.“All those skills complement her new role at St. Michael’s and help us to strengthen our outreach,” noted Kris Ishibashi, one of the wardens of the parish.Among the parish’s community ministries are its Saturday Kitchen (open since 1983) and the Pilgrim Resource Center, which serve hundreds of guests every weekend, and a relatively new program, Careersearchers, a job-search support group.St. Michael’s also helps support a ministry to families in need at nearby Trinity Lutheran Church, and members of the parish prepare meals for residents of Trinity’s shelter for homeless LGTBQ youth.St. Michael’s occupies a campus of three 1890s-vintage buildings: the church itself, the parish house and the rectory. Louis Comfort Tiffany created the church’s seven stained-glass windows (more than a story high) surrounding the apse, as well as the reredos in the Chapel of the Angels.A reconsecrated altar in the north end of the sanctuary came from St. Jude’s Chapel, founded in 1909, a ministry of St. Michael’s to the African-American community on West 99th Street, until the chapel was destroyed by a midcentury “urban-renewal” project.Music plays a very significant role in the life of St. Michael’s, during services and in community performances. The church maintains four choirs, from young children through adults, and holds two organs by the well-known builder Rudolf von Beckerath.Flexer returns to a parish of more than 600 individuals from more than 300 households whose demographics reflect its diverse neighborhood.Since 1852 the church has operated St. Michael’s Cemetery in Queens, open to people of all faiths, or none. Annual observances at the historic Cemetery include a concert honoring composer Scott Joplin, who is buried there; a remembrance honoring police, fire and first responders during the 9/11 attacks; and a fundraiser to support children of those who died from working on the World Trade Center cleanup.St. Michael’s fortunes have always been linked to those of its neighborhood. The church archives record that during the 1960s the once-thriving parish was so precarious that the Bishop of New York considered closing the church and selling the cemetery. The parish rebounded in the late ‘70s and ‘80s.Flexer’s rectorate begins a new era at an old but lively church. She will take up her duties on Dec. 14, the third Sunday of Advent. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Rev. Lucretia Jevne says: Ken and BErnadette Wachter says: Rector Belleville, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Shreveport, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET St. Michael’s calls Katharine G. Flexer as new rector Comments are closed. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Job Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Comments (7) Associate Rector Columbus, GA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 December 14, 2014 at 11:35 pm Kate,Salutations on your new ministry at St. Michael’s,and greetings from your many friends at St. Clements.How fitting that you take up your Rectorate on the festival ofOur Lady of Guadalupe — which Bruce featured in his sermon today.Bernadette and I were just remembering the event by theTeatro del Campesino in San Juan Bautista celebrating Juan Diego’s visionto which you took us andmany St. Clement’s friend one Christmastime.We wish you and your family and your parish the very best,for Christmas and the coming years.Ken and Bernadette Rector Collierville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Knoxville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Tampa, FL Rector Smithfield, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 People Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Rev. John Merchant says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Eventslast_img read more

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Detroit’s historically black St. Matthew’s added to ‘Freedom Network’

first_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York By Pat McCaughanPosted Feb 25, 2016 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Belleville, IL Press Release Service Rector Knoxville, TN February 27, 2016 at 10:44 am I think I heard that when John Brown came to Detroit to meet with community leaders, shortly before his raid at Harper’s Ferry, the meeting was held at St. Matthews. Is this true? Adrienne Sellers says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Bath, NC April 21, 2017 at 7:48 pm My family were members of old St. Matthew’s Church. My great great grandmother’s name was Louise Tomlinson, as was my great grandmother’ name was Louisa. her maiden name was Hulette, born in Ft. Erie, Ontario. My grandmother’s name was Clara Tomlinson Boston, she was married to William Boston, a popular undertaker. My mother’s name was Julia Sellers. I remember many stories about St. Matthew’s, the tea’s, the help to escaped slaves , King’s Daughter’s Group, the stories about the Underground Railroad, Mr. Lambert, William his grandson, old Greek Town at First Baptist Church as the last station of the Underground Railroad. Submit a Press Release Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL March 12, 2016 at 1:57 pm Great article that should be widely read throughout the country, particularly during Black History month, and thereafter. Thanks be to God for the faithful at St. Matthews” yet “carrying on” and still endeavoring to “lift up Christ”, serve the community, and make a positive impact in the city of Detroit, and in the lives of persons there; while still striving for freedom, favor, shared resources, and dignity for all persons wherever regardless of class, color or convictions. Director of Music Morristown, NJ Detroit’s historically black St. Matthew’s added to ‘Freedom Network’ National Park Service recognizes 170-year-old congregation’s Underground Railroad activism Joe Summers says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Tampa, FL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 [Episcopal News Service] Before Harriet Tubman escaped slavery, before Abraham Lincoln was elected to Congress and before Harriet Beecher Stowe wrote Uncle Tom’s Cabin, members of St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church were helping slaves escape across the Detroit River to freedom in Canada.Founded in 1846 above a blacksmith’s shop, St. Matthew’s is among the oldest historically black congregations in the Episcopal Church and in the nation, and was a center of local abolitionist activism and community organizing.Yet that aspect of the church’s past went relatively unrecognized until 2015, when the National Park Service added St. Matthew’s to its National Network to Freedom.“We found that it (St. Matthew’s) makes a significant contribution to the understanding of the Underground Railroad in American history … (and we) commend you on your dedication to this important aspect of our history,” Diane Miller, network national program manager, wrote in a June 4 letter announcing the award of the designation.Senior Warden Philip Carrington, the Rev. Canon Robert W. Alltop, Dr. Richard E Smith and Junior Warden ​Rudolph Markoe.For fourth-generation St. Matthew’s parishioner Dr. Richard E. Smith, who applied for the status, the quest to highlight the church’s storied past was a labor of love and long overdue. For nearly two decades, he wove together details of its proud history of community service and social activism.“We always heard bits and pieces about the church’s history, but there was no written record,” Smith told the Episcopal News Service recently.A time capsule offers a past and future glimpse The unearthing of a time capsule in 1998, planted by church members some 70 years earlier at the site of the congregation’s second location at St. Antoine and Elizabeth Streets, yielded a written record of what previously had been oral history passed among generations, he said.It also offered a glimpse into the city’s past. Those documents became part of the permanent collection of the Charles Wright Museum of African American History in Detroit, Smith said.“As a doctor, I deal in facts,” said Smith, an obstetrician-gynecologist, and vice president of Henry Ford Hospital Physician Outreach. “I began gathering information to put into a timeline for the church, along with family history and other information.”The Rev. William Monroe helped organize St. Matthew’s as a mission congregation.Among other significant events, Smith’s timeline reveals that:Nine years after Michigan became the 26th state in the union, 13 years after slavery was abolished in Canada and nearly 40 years after slavery was abolished in Michigan, St. Matthew’s was organized as a mission congregation by the Rev. William Monroe and local businessman William Lambert, who served as warden.Two years later, Lambert was elected a delegate to the National Convention of Colored Citizens held in Cleveland, at which Frederick Douglass was elected convention president. The same year, a city lot at the corner of St. Antoine and Congress was purchased to build the church and taxes of $2.22 paid to the state and county for the church.Over the next decade, nearly 40,000 fugitive slaves would pass through Detroit under the support and guidance of Lambert and others, including other churches in the city. “Everyone was working together, helping one another,” Smith said.Roy Finkenbine, vice chair of the Michigan Freedom Trail Commission, said St. Matthew’s was one of three churches in Detroit’s pre-Civil War black community that actively aided freedom-seekers.William Lambert was the senior warden and found of St. Matthew’s.Lambert, known as “the father of St. Matthew’s,” founded the Colored Vigilant Committee, “essentially an all-purpose organization to help freedom-seekers get to Canada,” he said.“It was all black in membership. They worked with select whites in the city and on the fringes of the city who would filter people to the committee. They did everything from raising funds to feeding (and) clothing people, providing medical care, hiding them in barns on the east side (and) getting them across the river late at night in skiffs hidden under the docks. They even offered legal representation.“It was an illegal activity and one that was particularly dangerous after 1850,” he said.A surprising revelation for junior warden Rudolph Markoe, a second-generation and lifelong St. Matthew’s member, was finding out “that we didn’t actually have a building for a stretch of time because many people left for Canada and California because of the threat of kidnapping and arrest.”That was after the government passed the 1850 Fugitive Slave Act, another in a series of federal laws allowing for capture and return of runaway slaves, and harsh penalties imposed against the slaves and anyone who helped them. Enforcement of the law often facilitated kidnapping and enslaving of free people of color, prompting many to flee to Canada. The Rev. William Monroe emigrated to Liberia to establish an Episcopal mission. During that time, remaining St. Matthew’s members met at Christ Church Detroit, and their building was sold to a Jewish congregation, Shaary Zedek. The St. Matthew’s Mission Fund was established, pooling money to assist newcomers and later to build the next church.Other highlights of the church’s history include:In 1855, James Holly was ordained a deacon at St. Matthew’s, and he was the first of six clergy associated with the church to become bishops in the Episcopal Church, according to Smith. Holly was consecrated the first black bishop in the Episcopal Church and founded the Episcopal Church in Haiti, the largest missionary diocese in the Episcopal Church. Others include the Rt. Revs. G. Mott Williams; Quintin Primo Jr.; Orris Walker Jr.; Arthur Williams and Irving Mayson.The mission revived in the 1880s, at another site near downtown Detroit, and became “the center for improvement and service clubs.” By 1906 St. Matthew’s was so popular it had to limit participants, according to Smith. A year later, the church attained parish status.After the turn of the century, the Detroit chapter of the NAACP was established at and met at St. Matthew’s.During the 1920s then-rector the Rev. Evard Daniel continued as a trendsetter, developing a relationship with automaker Henry Ford and facilitating the hiring of many African Americans for factory work during “the Great Migration” of blacks from the South. Located in Detroit’s “Paradise Valley,” a business and entertainment hub, church membership was reportedly 800 communicants, with 300 children in its Sunday school, according to a Dec. 11, 1926, Detroit Free Press article.Donors included Clara Ford, spouse of automaker Henry Ford and an occasional worshipper at the church.In 1926, Marian Anderson performed her first Detroit concert at the Nov. 1 dedication of St. Matthew’s new parish house; the time capsule was placed in the cornerstone. The famed opera singer returned in 1939 for a repeat performance at St. Matthew’s, after being barred from Constitution Hall by the Daughters of the American Revolution.Markoe also underscored the church’s involvement as an early meeting place for the NAACP and its social activism in the 1925 landmark trial of Dr. Ossian Sweet, whose wife, Gladys Mitchell, was an active St. Matthew’s member.“They sponsored fundraisers to raise money for Clarence Darrow to come and defend Sweet,” he said. In a case considered to be one of the most important civil rights trials of that decade, Darrow successfully defended Sweet, a black medical doctor, against murder charges after a crowd threatened to eject Sweet from the all-white neighborhood where he had purchased a home. During the scuffle, someone in the crowd was shot and killed.Sweet’s acquittal was considered a milestone decision in asserting the rights of blacks to defend their person and property.In 1940, the Rev. Ricksford Meyers was called as rector of the church; his wife, Dr. Marjorie Peebles-Meyers, became the first African American woman to graduate from the Wayne State University Medical School and to integrate many local hospitals.Urban renewal, a new location and a mergerSweeping urban renewal and social change impacted the congregation over the next several decades. New freeway construction displaced Detroit’s Paradise Valley; church membership dwindled.St. Matthew’s and St. Joseph’s merged in 1971 and is known affectionately as “Matty-Joes.”Yet the tradition of social activism remained intact; clergy participated in 1960s civil rights demonstrations locally and nationally. In 1971, because of declining membership and economic challenges, St. Matthew’s merged with and relocated to St. Joseph’s Church in the mid-city area of Detroit.“It was a melding of two communities of faith, each with their own unique identities that worked together and made it a fascinating place,” according to the Rev. Kenneth Near, who has served at the church. St. Joseph’s was a center of anti-Vietnam War activism, he said.In 1998, the former church building was razed to make way for the construction of Ford Field, the home of the Detroit Lions professional football team; the time capsule was removed and opened. Also removed was a city-designated historic plaque.Finkenbine said receiving the National Park Service Freedom Network designation “for something like the Underground Railroad says something, particularly in the case of churches, about who and what an organization wants to be. The fact that people were taking a chance to assist people in need, that they were willing to put a higher law above the national law, says something about those folks. The desire to recognize that as part of your heritage says something about the institution today and how the institution wants to operate and to work with issues today.”St. Matthew’s continues “hands-on ministry” with a Sunday morning breakfast program that feeds about 60 and other ministries “geared toward assisting or lending a hand or step up to people who, for whatever reason, have fallen on hard times or can’t quite navigate through life’s problems,” Markoe said.He said he learned the church’s history “in doses through the years,” through the work of others, such as the late Lillian Southern, the church historian who died in January 2015, and through Smith.“It makes you feel a certain pride … a certain responsibility to keep that tradition going because people long before me saw a need and were committed to changing it.”The Union of Black Episcopalians National President Annette Buchanan said, “St. Matthews stands in the great tradition of our historically black churches, many of whom were born out of the struggle for racial justice.“On Feb. 13 as we commemorated the feast day of blessed Absalom Jones, our first black priest, and his founding of our first black Episcopal church, St. Thomas African Episcopal Church, we appreciate the foundation that he laid of community outreach, advocacy, and evangelism which St. Matthews has proudly perpetuated.“The Black Episcopal Church has been and will continue to be the conscience of our denomination reminding us of our baptismal covenant to respect the dignity of every human being.”Finkenbine said it is extremely important to have historically African American churches recognized on the Network for Freedom “because all too frequently nothing of them remains in local communities. Many institutions have disappeared off the landscape over the 150 years since the Underground Railroad ended. Those churches which are still active and exist like St. Matthew’s have to carry the water, be symbolic of all that larger area of work that black communities and black churches did to help bring freedom.”St. Matthew’s 1880-1971 photo taken taken circa 1945.Smith agreed. His quest to uncover and to gain recognition of the St. Matthew’s story intersected with the stories of his own and other families, he said.“My family is one of the oldest in Michigan; we were a part of a family group of freedom-seekers, black settlers who left Fredericksburg, Virginia, about 1845,” he told ENS. “For as far back as I remember, I heard stories of the Underground Railroad.”His interest peaked after a relative gave him the family’s “original 1803 ‘free papers’ from Virginia,” he said. “In my efforts to document our history, I also researched the stories I heard about St. Matthew’s early history. I was further energized with the opening of the time capsule from the church building on St. Antoine.”During his research he was inspired to press on by the words of co-founder Lambert:“We hold our liberty more dearly than we do our lives, and we will organize and prepare ourselves with determination: live or die, sink or swim, we will never be taken back into slavery.“We will never voluntarily separate ourselves from the slave population in the country, for they are our fathers and mothers, and sisters and brothers; their interest, their wrongs and their sufferings are ours. The injuries inflicted on them are alike inflicted on us. Therefore, it is our duty to aid and assist them in their attempts to obtain their liberty.”– The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. Rector Washington, DC Comments are closed. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Collierville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA center_img July 12, 2016 at 10:57 am No it isn’t. The meeting was held at the home of William Webb, which was CLOSE to the original site of St. Matthews. But the meeting was held in Webb’s home, not the church. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Shreveport, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit an Event Listing Raleigh Daniel Hairston, D.Min. says: Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Racial Justice & Reconciliation Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Albany, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Tags Comments (4) The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Events Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Jamon Jordan says: last_img read more

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Un entrenamiento prepara a las delegadas a la UNCSW para…

first_img Delegadas episcopales a la 60a. sesión anual de la Comisión de Naciones Unidas sobre la Condición de la Mujer reunidas el 22 de marzo en Hampton Inn, a cuadra y media de la sede de la ONU, para participar en un entrenamiento sobre promoción social. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS.[Episcopal News Service] La delegación episcopal que representa a la Iglesia y sus políticas en la sesión anual de Comisión de Naciones Unidas sobre la Condición [Jurídica y Social] de la Mujer se reunió el 22 de marzo para un entrenamiento sobre promoción [o defensa] social concebido para capacitar a las delegadas a llevar el mensaje a sus diócesis, iglesias y comunidades de origen, y a comprometer a otras personas en el empeño de no “dejar a nadie atrás”.Como parte del ejercicio diseñado para compartir los temas debatidos en la UNCSW a nivel nacional y local, instaron a las delegadas a escoger un asunto que les pareciera de particular resonancia, [y que explicaran] por qué es importante y, en este caso, qué les gustaría ver que los legisladores hicieran al respecto.El punto fue “pensar acerca de los grandes temas en el contexto local”, dijo Jayce Hafner, analista de política nacional de la Iglesia Episcopal que trabaja en la Oficina de Relaciones Gubernamentales [de la Iglesia] con sede en Washington, D.C., y quien dirigió el taller de entrenamiento en la Hampton Inn, un hotel que queda cerca del edificio de Naciones Unidas en el centro de Manhattan.La promoción social, explicó Hafner, consiste en investigar un problema, llegar a conocer a las personas afectadas por el problema y establecer y mantener relaciones con los legisladores y su personal auxiliar.“Uno no tiene que ser un experto para ser buen defensor de una causa”, dijo ella, añadiendo que los episcopales pueden considerar la Red Episcopal de Política Pública como un recurso.La mitad de las delegadas que representan diócesis a través de la Iglesia Episcopal dijeron que ya están comprometidas en la promoción [o defensa] social en el ámbito local o nacional, o en ambos.Por ejemplo, la Rda. Connie Sánchez, de la Diócesis de Honduras, compartió un ejemplo de cómo la Iglesia Episcopal y sus asociados ecuménicos han trabajado durante años a favor de crear conciencia y de proteger los derechos de personas que viven con el VIH en Honduras.Mujeres de toda la Iglesia Episcopal y de todo el ámbito de la Comunión Anglicana, que representan a más de 20 países, se han reunido en Nueva York para asistir a la 60ª. sesión de la UNCSW del 14 al 24 de marzo.El tema de la 60ª. reunión anual de la UNCSW se centró en “El empoderamiento de la mujer y su relación con el desarrollo sostenible”. Sigue al respaldo que le dieron los líderes mundiales en 2015 a la Agenda 2030 para el Desarrollo sostenible, la cual incluye 17 nuevos Objetivos de Desarrollo Sostenible y 169 metas para ponerle fin a la pobreza, combatir las desigualdades y promover la prosperidad en tanto se protege al medioambiente. Los ODS se han definido a partir de los ocho Objetivos de Desarrollo del Milenio adoptados en 2000.“La UNCSW de este año ha sido enteramente acerca de la implementación de la Agenda 2030 de Desarrollo Sostenible”, dijo Main, luego del entrenamiento de promoción social del 22 de marzo, añadiendo que “no dejar a nadie atrás” ha sido un énfasis constante. “Como sociedad civil se nos insta a garantizar que la implementación tiene lugar en el ámbito nacional.Como Main señalaba al comienzo de la comisión de dos semanas: “Lo que tiene lugar en la UNCSW será eficaz en la medida de lo que ocurra en nuestros lugares de origen”.La Iglesia Episcopal es una de las varias representaciones de la “sociedad civil”, lo cual significa organizaciones no gubernamentales sin fines de lucro e individuos dedicados a la promoción social y a la labor de activistas, representados en las Naciones Unidas.Además de las delegaciones episcopales oficiales, viajaron a Nueva York un grupo oficial en representación de la Comunión Anglicana y otras muchas mujeres y hombres en representación de Empoderamiento de Mujeres Anglicana, Mujeres Episcopales, la Red Internacional de Mujeres Anglicanas, la Iglesia Anglicana del Canadá y la Diócesis Episcopal de Nueva York que asistieron a eventos y paneles paralelos fuera de la sede [de la ONU].Los eventos externos incluyeron un panel centrado en los instrumentos de desarrollo sostenible para mujeres y niñas; un discurso del secretario general de la Comunión Anglicana centrado en la manera en que las mujeres pueden trabajar juntas para cambiar el destino de mujeres y niñas en sus comunidades, y la presentación de una experta sobre las contribuciones de las mujeres a la pacificación en la que habló de que las mujeres deben reclamar sus lugares en los espacios de la toma de decisiones. El obispo primado Michael Curry predicó durante una eucaristía especial el 17 de marzo.El otoño pasado, la Iglesia Episcopal presentó una declaración a la UNCSW en que identificaba cuatro retos actuales y les pedía a los estados miembros “adoptar y poner en vigor rápidamente una legislación sobre las siguientes necesidades urgentes”: capacitar a las mujeres para acceder al poder y a puestos donde se toman las decisiones; fomentar el empoderamiento y la independencia económica de mujeres y niñas; erradicar la violencia contras mujeres y niñas y brindarles un tratamiento preferencial a mujeres y niñas marginadas.El Obispo Primado determinó las prioridades oficiales de la Iglesia Episcopal en materia de promoción social basándose en las resoluciones de la Convención General y del Consejo Ejecutivo y en la posición de la Iglesia en asuntos tales como la trata de personas y la violencia de género, relacionados con las conversaciones que ahora mismo tienen lugar en la ONU.Jennifer Allen, delegada de la Diócesis de Kansas, dijo — al comienzo de las dos semanas de sesión de la Comisión, en una entrevista con Episcopal News Service en el Centro Denominacional de la Iglesia—, que las cuatro prioridades de la Iglesia Episcopal se ajustan a su ministerio laico tanto en su diócesis como en Kenia, donde ella trabaja en temas de capacitación de mujeres, desigualdad, acceso a atención sanitaria y eliminación de violencia de género.Luego de participar en más de una semana en [debates sobre] promoción social, mesas redondas y otros eventos, Allen dijo que ella había llegado a darse cuenta de que la equidad de género es un componente de cada uno de los 17 Objetivos de Desarrollo Sostenible y necesario para el éxito de la agenda 2030 de desarrollo.En un nivel más inmediato y práctico, agregó, cuando regrese a Kansas, donde además de participar activamente en la iglesia, ella es enfermera titular, procurará ayuda y extender su red de conexiones porque esta es una tarea que no puede hacer sola.— Lynette Wilson es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Por Lynette WilsonPosted Mar 23, 2016 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Anglican Communion, Press Release Service Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Un entrenamiento prepara a las delegadas a la UNCSW para llevar el mensaje a sus sitios de origen Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Press Release TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab UNCSW Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Bath, NC Submit a Job Listingcenter_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Albany, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Tags Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing Rector Shreveport, LA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Events Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Belleville, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY last_img read more

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Ottawa Anglican plans Christian co-housing for seniors

first_img Submit an Event Listing Rector Bath, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Tags Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Collierville, TN Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Smithfield, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Albany, NY Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit a Press Release Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector Columbus, GA Ottawa Anglican plans Christian co-housing for seniors Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Tampa, FL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Belleville, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit a Job Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Jobs & Calls Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET A rendering of the Ottawa co-housing project for seniors by its architect, Rosaline Hill, who is a member of St. Alban’s Anglican Church.[Anglican Journal] An Ottawa architect is planning a new kind of residence for seniors—an intentional community, to be built on redeveloped church property.Rosaline Hill, a member of St. Alban’s Anglican Church, hopes to build a residence containing 20-30 units in the nation’s capital, according to Crosstalk, the newspaper of the diocese of Ottawa. The development would be based on the idea of “co-housing”—the formation of communities organized by a group of like- minded people.Full article. Rector Shreveport, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Anglican Communion Posted Oct 26, 2016 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Martinsville, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Press Release Service Featured Events This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MIlast_img read more

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Two candidates added to slate for the 11th bishop of…

first_img Episcopal Diocese of South DakotaPosted Apr 2, 2019 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Tags The Diocese of South Dakota is pleased to announce two additional candidates for the 11th Bishop of the Diocese of South Dakota.The Rev. Dr. John Floberg, Church of the Cross, Selfridge, St. James, Cannon Ball, St. Lukes, Ft. Yates, North Dakota, and the Rev. Bob Two Bulls Jr., Vicar All Saints Indian Mission, Minneapolis, Minnesota, Missioner of the Department of Indian Work & Multicultural Ministry, will be joining the Rev. Dr. Jonathan Folts, Rector of St. Johns Episcopal Church, Essex, Connecticut and the Rev. Dr. Mark Story, Rector of St. Mary’s, Episcopal Church, Edmond, Oklahoma.All four biographies and personal statements are available on the Diocese of South Dakota webpage here. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Press Release Service Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit an Event Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Belleville, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Knoxville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Bishop Elections, Submit a Job Listing House of Bishops Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Candidates for the 11th Bishop of South Dakota Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Press Release Rector Collierville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector Columbus, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Washington, DC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Smithfield, NC Back to Press Releases Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Albany, NY Featured Events Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Tampa, FL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OHlast_img read more

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At Georgetown forum, Episcopal leaders discuss religious groups’ role in…

first_img Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME By Egan MillardPosted Sep 6, 2019 Rector Martinsville, VA Rebecca Linder Blachly, director of The Episcopal Church’s Office of Government Relations, speaks at the “Two Possible Futures: Faith Action to End AIDS” forum at Georgetown University’s Berkley Center for Religion, Peace & World Affairs in Washington on Sept. 4, 2019. Photo: Egan Millard/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Washington, D.C.] At a forum on the involvement of faith communities in the fight against HIV/AIDS, two leaders from The Episcopal Church spoke out about the significant obstacles that remain, despite decades of dramatic progress.Rebecca Linder Blachly, director of The Episcopal Church’s Office of Government Relations, and Jesse Milan Jr., president and CEO of AIDS United and a former president of the board of the National Episcopal AIDS Coalition, participated in a forum called “Two Possible Futures: Faith Action to End AIDS” at Georgetown University in Washington on Sept. 5.The two-part panel discussion, hosted by Georgetown’s Berkley Center for Religion, Peace & World Affairs, focused on the role of religious groups at a critical time in the effort to end HIV/AIDS. The global fight against the disease that has killed about 32 million people has made enormous progress since the 1990s, with AIDS-related deaths down more than 50 percent since the peak in 2004, and experts say ending the pandemic is now within reach. However, progress has slowed and infections are increasing in some regions, raising the possibility of a major resurgence in the 2020s.Religious groups, the panel members said, can make the difference between the two possible futures in the event’s title. By 2030, religious groups could come together and use their moral conviction and deeply engaged networks to end AIDS – or they could fail to do so, and the disease will continue to kill millions of people per year.In the first panel, titled “Looking Back,” participants discussed how religion helped and hurt the response to AIDS. Milan, who has been living with HIV since the 1980s, said that many churches have historically focused more on ministering to the dead and dying than on prevention.“The church has stepped up at times when someone was dead, but not when someone was at risk,” Milan said.Because of churches’ past work with AIDS as a terminal illness, Milan said, many religious leaders are not up to speed on recent innovations that address HIV as a sexual health issue.Milan identified several HIV-related factors which he believes churches failed to address: the agency of women around their sexual health, human rights issues for LGBTQ+ people and health disparities based solely on race.Milan also pointed out that, because there are “only so many seats at the table” in policy discussions about HIV, someone selected to represent “the faith community” may not be able to speak for the complex array of religious people. And there’s also the problem of decisions being made without the input of people living with HIV, he said.In the second half of the discussion, “Looking Ahead,” Blachly spoke about some of the most successful aspects of The Episcopal Church’s work to end AIDS. Partnerships with the World Council of Churches, the Anglican Communion, the United Nations and other groups have been very productive, she said. In the future, Blachly hopes to “overcome resistance to partnerships. We know partnerships work,” she told the panel.Blachly pointed to a generational gap as one of the new challenges in the continuing fight against the disease.“Young people don’t remember the AIDS crisis,” she said, a point echoed by Milan and others. And there’s a widespread sense that the problem of HIV has essentially been solved, which means it tends to be a lower priority than problems thought to be more pressing, like climate change and human trafficking.Another panelist, David Barstow, who wrote a book that imagines two possible trajectories in detail – ending AIDS or letting it come roaring back – said that his vision for the winning future includes a coalition of major religious leaders making a public appeal at the 23rd International AIDS Conference in San Francisco in July 2020.Who would he like to see there?“The pope, the Dalai Lama, Desmond Tutu, Michael Curry,” Barstow said. “The big ones, down the list.”Panelists were divided on which future they think is more likely, but Blachly was firmly in the optimistic camp, pointing to “historic bipartisan support” in Congress recently.“We have the tools to do it if we have the political will and support,” she said.– Egan Millard is an assistant editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab HIV/AIDS Tags Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Collierville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Albany, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit an Event Listing Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Belleville, IL Rector Bath, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Press Release Service Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Featured Events Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK At Georgetown forum, Episcopal leaders discuss religious groups’ role in ending AIDS The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KYlast_img read more

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Korean Anglicans send COVID-19 aid to Episcopal partners in New…

first_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit an Event Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls Tags Rector Collierville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Smithfield, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Health & Healthcare Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Events Press Release Service Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Job Listing Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Martinsville, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 COVID-19, Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Cathedral Dean Boise, ID This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Korean Anglicans send COVID-19 aid to Episcopal partners in New York Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Anglican Communion, Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Tampa, FL By ACNS staff Posted Apr 22, 2020 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA [Anglican Communion News Service] Christians from the Diocese of Daejeon in the Anglican Church of Korea sent a package of aid to the Episcopal Diocese of New York. Members of the diocese collected 5,000 face masks, 3,000 bottles of hand sanitizer and 3,000 sets of protective clothing. The items were collected during Holy Week as preparations were underway to turn the Cathedral Church of St John the Divine in New York into a field hospital. Those plans have been put on hold as health officials in the city of New York say that the extra emergency beds are no longer needed.Read the full story here. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem last_img read more

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