For Libya, ‘no compromise’ in sight

first_imgWhen the popular protests that have swept the Mideast reached Libya in mid-February, Ali Suleiman Aujali knew what he had to do. The longtime Libyan diplomat, who had served as ambassador to the United States for the past two years, abruptly quit and threw his support behind the rebel uprising.Libyan leader Moammar “Gadhafi made it very easy for me,” Aujali told a packed audience at the John F. Kennedy Jr. Forum on Tuesday (March 29). “He is killing his own people without discrimination and without limit.”When dealing with an authoritarian ruler such as Gadhafi, Aujali said, he learned that “there is no compromise.”It was a lesson that Aujali hoped to drive home at Harvard, and one that the United States and its allies must learn now that they have entered the escalating conflict, he said at “Libya After the No-Fly Zone: Political Change or Civil War?” — a discussion hosted by the Harvard Kennedy School’s (HKS) Middle East Initiative and the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs and moderated by R. Nicholas Burns, Sultan of Oman Professor of the Practice of International Relations at HKS.Aujali, who is now a part of the unrecognized transitional government of Libya, said Libyans are united in their desire to see Gadhafi go, and urged the United States to provide arms and money to rebels to help speed his exit. “Libyans want some justice, and they want help for their future,” he said. “We want also, of course, to exercise our right as a democratic country.”But the road to Libyan democracy is paved with unanswered questions: How strong are Gadhafi’s forces on the ground? Just who are the rebel forces the American-backed international coalition is supporting? And now that the United States has intervened in a potentially protracted civil war, how does it formulate an efficient and effective strategy for putting Libya on a path to true reform?To help answer those questions, Aujali was joined by Dirk Vandewalle, associate professor of government at Dartmouth College and an authority on Libyan politics, and Stephen Walt, Robert and Renée Belfer Professor of International Affairs and faculty chair of HKS’s International Security Program.American leaders shouldn’t make the mistake of thinking Gadhafi can be negotiated with, Vandewalle argued. Gadhafi, who rules Libya more like a warlord than a modern head of state, is driven by a kind of “tribal ethos” to maintain power at all costs and to quash dissent within his ranks. Furthermore, Vandewalle said, Gadhafi “truly believes … that he represents the true voice of the Arab people.”“If you live in that kind of self-referential world for so long, where no one ever questions you, you come to believe what you’re saying,” Vandewalle said.Where Aujali was hopeful for a democratic Libya, Vandewalle was skeptical. Libya has had “no real institutions or state to speak of” since Gadhafi came to power, he said. “How likely is democracy in a country that doesn’t even have the very basic institutions of what democracies need to sustain themselves?”In the short term, the international coalition that instituted a no-fly zone in Libya on March 18 will have to figure out how to get Gadhafi out — and how it will respond if he doesn’t leave quickly and quietly.“The best outcome here is a rapid transition of power,” Walt said. “If this [allied intervention] is a success, NATO will get some credit, and the United States will get a lot of the credit … but if this goes south, the U.S. will end up getting a lot of the blame as well.”The allied air strikes arrived just in time to save the lives of perhaps tens of thousands of Libyans in Benghazi, the panelists agreed. But the danger, Walt said, is that what began as a humanitarian intervention in Libya could ultimately lead to much more bloodshed if Gadhafi isn’t driven from power soon. If he remains steadfastly in power, Walt said, America and its allies “will face a whole series of very awkward choices” on whether to arm or provide funds to the rebel army, and perhaps even whether to send ground troops into the country.“This is a society that most of us don’t understand particularly well, and getting a desirable outcome is not going to be easy and not going to be quick,” Walt said.But if the United States and its allies help see Libya through a gradual transition to representative government, Aujali concluded, the United States could finally achieve that most elusive of successes, one that today seems as unlikely as Mideast revolutions did before this year: “more respect and more credibility in the Arab world.”last_img read more

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Seniors head to Peace Corps

first_imgNotre Dame ranked 18th among medium-sized schools this year to send the most volunteers to serve in the group, according to a University press release. The University jumped five spots on the list from last year as the Peace Corps prepares to mark its 50th anniversary, the release said. Notre Dame was included on this list for the past 11 years. Peace Corps recruiter Rok Teasley said Notre Dame averaged 23 applicants to the group in each of the past four years. Nineteen seniors applied already this year, and the rolling application process is ongoing. Current seniors wishing to join the 25 Notre Dame alumni currently serving in the Peace Corps must first complete a grueling application process, according to the release. Senior Claire Brosnihan said the process includes a lengthy online application, an hour-long interview with very specific and personal questions, and multiple steps of clearance, contributing to months of waiting. Brosnihan, a political science major with a minor in peace studies, said she would be stationed in French-speaking sub-Saharan Africa to work on a malnutrition-focused public health program. “The Peace Corps gives you a different perspective from South Bend, Indiana and Notre Dame,” Brosnihan said. “Putting all of your beliefs into action is a big part of it.” Brosnihan said she would like to work in international relations or at an international non-profit organization after her time in the Peace Corps. Senior Shannon Coyne will also join the Peace Corps after graduation. A political science and Arabic double major with a minor in peace studies, Coyne said she will be teaching English in either Jordan or Morocco. “I was attracted to the principles that underlie the mission of the [Peace Corps],” Coyne said. “I was interested in post-graduate service, and it seemed like a logical choice.” Coyne said her minor in Peace Studies prepared her for her time in the Peace Corps. “Peace Studies classes are good for helping you think about ways to promote international development,” Coyne said. “But more than my studies, my experiences outside the classroom really prepared me.” Coyne participated in service through the Center for Social Concerns and the Kellogg Institute, and traveled to Ghana and Cairo, Egypt through the University, which provided invaluable service experiences for her. Coyne said she is most interested in gender issues and will seek a master’s degree in development after leaving the Peace Corps in hopes of working for a non-governmental organization. Megan Conway, a 2006 Notre Dame graduate, also studied Peace Studies while she was a student. She joined the Peace Corps after graduation and is now at the University of Michigan Law School. Conway said a class on tropical African politics she took as an undergraduate piqued her interest in Africa. She was stationed in Cameroon, where she worked on public health initiatives. “We worked with potable water projects, AIDS education, basic health and hygiene and environmental education classes,” Conway said. “And I focused in pre-natal care projects.” Although her time in the Peace Corps was rewarding and worthwhile, Conway said she learned that international sustainable development, more specifically public health, was not the field for her. “I had a phenomenal experience, but I realized that I didn’t want to live abroad for the rest of my life,” Conway said. Conway said the unique undergraduate experience at Notre Dame contributed to her choice to join the Peace Corps. “I don’t think I would have joined the Peace Corps if I had attended one of the other universities I was thinking of,” Conway said. Notre Dame’s relationship can be attributed to the University’s mission to serve others, Coyne said. “It’s definitely the emphasis that Notre Dame students put on service,” Coyne said, “and taking what you learn in the classroom to give back to others.”last_img read more

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Plans for Carmichael coal mine in Australia run into another roadblock

first_imgPlans for Carmichael coal mine in Australia run into another roadblock FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享The Guardian:The controversial Carmichael coalmine has been delayed indefinitely by the Queensland government, which has ruled that Adani’s proposals to protect the endangered black-throated finch do not meet the miner’s approval conditions.The decision, made by the state environment department and not by the political arm of government, forces Adani to complete significant additional work before it can begin construction of the mine.The finch management plan is one of two key hurdles before Adani can start work on its mine. The second is a groundwater plan, which also requires state approval and is under review.In a statement, the department said it was seeking a number of new commitments from Adani, including that the company gathers more accurate information about the black-throated finch population “which is vital to effectively manage and monitor the impacts of the project on the … finch and essential habitats in the project area”.While the decision was welcomed by environmentalists, amid an election campaign where Adani’s coal project has become a significant issue, it does not amount to a rejection or a block on the Carmichael mine. In some respects, the advice from the department offers Adani a clear path to approval of the plan, by outlining the actions authorities require.More: Queensland delays Adani mine indefinitely, citing fears for endangered finchlast_img read more

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California High School Shooting: 2 Shot, Shooter in Custody

first_img23ABC News is streaming live video from the scene. Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A gunman reportedly opened fire inside a Southern California high school Thursday morning and is in custody, according to local media outlets.There have been conflicting reports on the number of people who were shot inside Taft High School. KABC-TV reported that two people were injured. According to the reports, the shooting occurred around 9 a.m.23ABC News said they received calls from people who were hiding inside closets.Police are now securing the building.The shooting comes less than a month after a madman gunned down 20 children and six adults at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn.The shooting has reignited the emotional debate over gun control laws in the country.last_img read more

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East Hills Teens Arrested for $17K Wheelchair Theft

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Have you seen this wheelchair?Two teenage boys who allegedly stole a motorized wheelchair and rode it around Flower Hill until the battery died were arrested after posting photos of the crime online, Nassau County police said.The 14-year-old East Hills suspects broke into a home that was under construction on Ridge Drive and stole a Quantum 600 Power Base wheelchair worth more than $17,000 at 11:30 p.m. Saturday, police said.The teens abandoned the wheelchair after it ran out of power. Third Squad detectives apprehended the duo Monday after they posted pictures of the crime on Facebook, police said.Both suspects were charged with burglary and grand larceny. Their names were not released because they were charged as juveniles in Family Court.The wheelchair was later found and returned to its owner.last_img read more

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Young voters aided Biden win, seek more progressive Democratic Party

first_imgMembers of the Georgia Tech Women’s basketball team hold voting signs outside of McCamish Pavillion which serves as a polling place on Election Day in Atlanta, Ga., on Tuesday, November 3, 2020.Tom Williams | CQ-Roll Call, Inc. | Getty Images Now, youth organizers are pushing the Democratic Party to embrace a more progressive platform.“Progressive voters are the future of this country, progressive policies are the future of politics, and we are going to keep fighting to make sure that Biden’s administration is as progressive as possible,” Weinberg said.Young voters’ electoral impactVoters ages 18-29, particularly young people of color, supported Biden at a greater rate than any other age group, NBC News exit polls show. Between 73% and 87% of Latino, Asian and Black youth supported Biden, compared with 51% of White youth, according to data from the Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement, or CIRCLE, at Tufts University.In key swing states such as Arizona, Michigan and Pennsylvania, where NBC News has projected a Biden win, preliminary data shows young people’s support helped push Biden over the margin of victory. Biden made gains in Michigan and Pennsylvania counties with large college student populations. With catchphrases such as “Because a C+ is better than an F,” the campaign focused on mobilizing young people to vote President Donald Trump out of office. After more than 290,000 followers and millions of likes, comments and shares on the account, Settle for Biden has become an advocacy group and its name has proven to be an effective rallying cry for young voters.Other progressive groups have also been organizing young people for political action, including the climate-focused Sunrise Movement, anti-gun violence group March for Our Lives, immigrant advocacy group United We Dream and other movements.Their efforts may have had an impact on Biden’s victory. Turnout among voting-eligible Americans ages 18-29 increased significantly from 2016 to 2020 and a majority of them supported Biden, according to preliminary analysis from Tufts University.- Advertisement – Young Black voters played a crucial role in flipping Georgia, a traditionally Republican stronghold, where Biden currently holds a narrow lead. Voters ages 18-29 made up 21% of the state’s voter share — 5% higher than the youth voter share nationwide. About 90% of young Black voters supported Biden, compared with 34% of White youth and 57% of all youth voters in Georgia.  President-elect Joe Biden was not Sam Weinberg’s first or even second choice for the White House. Like many young progressives, the 19-year-old Illinois native had supported Sens. Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren during the Democratic primaries.But in April, when Biden became the last man standing in the Democratic primary, Weinberg decided to back the centrist candidate.Fearing his peers might not follow suit, he created “Settle for Biden,” an Instagram account using what he describes as “sardonic millennial and Gen Z humor” to convince young people to, well, settle for Biden.- Advertisement –center_img “We won this election for Joe Biden,” said Nikayla Jefferson, a 24-year-old organizer for the Sunrise Movement. “We’re not going to let that go. He definitely owes his administration to us.”The Biden campaign did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment.A divided partyIn April, a coalition of progressive youth groups including the Sunrise Movement, the March for Our Lives Action Fund, United We Dream Action and Justice Democrats penned a letter to Biden asking him to earn the support of young people. The coalition urged Biden to support policies such as “Medicare for All,” canceling student debt, a wealth tax and the Green New Deal commitment to clean energy.“We need you to champion the bold ideas that have galvanized our generation and given us hope in the political process,” the letter read.On Wednesday, the Sunrise Movement and Justice Democrats released a list of recommendations for Biden’s Cabinet, including Warren as Treasury secretary and Sanders as labor secretary.The move comes as tension grows between the Democratic Party’s moderate and liberal factions. As Democrats’ House majority is projected to shrink following the 2020 election, centrist Democrats have blamed progressive policies for costing the party seats, including “Medicare for All” and the Green New Deal.Meanwhile, progressive Democrats have criticized moderate Democrats for catering more to center-right voters than those who consistently vote blue. Prominent figures such as Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Rashida Tlaib are urging the party to “embrace the base.”“It’s important to not ignore who supports you the most,” said Mary-Pat Hector, a 22-year-old youth voting advocate based in Atlanta. “Young people are now officially a huge part of their base, so it’s important to talk to them.”Hector points to Black female leaders who have rallied youth voters in Georgia for years, including Tamieka Atkins, Helen Butler, Nse Ufot, Deborah Scott and 2018 Democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams.“We really need to be thinking about how to be in conversation with young people, not just in the two to three months before an election like we’re cramming for a test,” said Abby Kiesa, deputy director of CIRCLE.“If we don’t have politicians in there that seem like they care about young people, then we’re not going to want to get involved,” said 20-year-old Emily Zanieski, co-leader of Students for Ossoff, a youth-led initiative to elect Georgia Democratic Senate candidate Jon Ossoff.‘We are the future of the party’For many young people, Biden’s campaign promise of a return to “normalcy” is not enough.“This sense of uncertainty about the future is something we’ve been feeling for a long time, and that comes down to issues such as health care, education affordability and climate change,” said Royce Mann, 19, legislative director for March for Our Lives’ Georgia chapter.“The party needs to start listening to its progressive wing and start understanding that a progressive platform aligns with folks who I don’t think a centrist could ever reach,” said Isabella Guinigundo, an 18-year-old organizer with Ohio Progressive Asian Women’s Leadership. “Progressive policies are good policies for anyone interested in good paying jobs and a future that is for all of us.”The Democratic Party’s first test? Biden’s Cabinet appointees.In addition to the Sunrise Movement and Justice Democrats, Settle for Biden has also released a slate of recommendations for top government posts. With the fate of the Senate still unknown, youth organizers are urging Biden to use his executive powers in key areas such as the Covid-19 pandemic, climate change and the economy.“The work starts now. We have to hold these people accountable to support the policies that we want to see happen in the future,” said Marcia Lacopo, 21, a North Carolina-based organizer with progressive youth voting initiative NextGen America.After propelling Biden to the White House, young progressives expect the president-elect to deliver on the mandate they’ve given him.“We are the future of the party,” Sunrise Movement’s Jefferson said. “We’ve made it very clear that the party is changing and either they come with us or we kick them out of office.” – Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

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Larsa Pippen Says She’s Fighting COVID-19 Amid Kardashian Rift

first_imgLarsa Pippen revealed that she’s been sick with the novel coronavirus after making headlines for her hot takes on the Kardashian family — but she quickly deleted the announcement.“I’ve been battling Covid for a week. It’s no joke I’ve never felt pain like this!” the Real Housewives of Miami alum, 46, wrote on her Instagram Story on Friday, November 13, before removing the post hours later.Larsa Pippen attends the ROC Nation Pre-Grammy Brunc Larsa Pippen Says She Tested Positive for COVID-19 Amid Kardashian DramaLarsa Pippen attends the ROC Nation Pre-Grammy Brunch in Los Angeles on February 9, 2019. Broadimage/Shutterstock- Advertisement – Us Weekly can confirm that the reality TV personality tested positive for COVID-19 as the global health crisis rages on. “She’s been battling it for a week with a hard time breathing,” Pippen’s rep said. “She’s had horrible body aches. We’re hoping she starts feeling better soon.”Pippen’s health revelation comes shortly after she came clean about the state of her current relationship with Kim Kardashian, Kourtney Kardashian and Khloé Kardashian amid rumors that the longtime pals had a falling out. While discussing her history with the famous family, Pippen called out Kanye West for being the reason for her feud with Kim, 40.“If Kanye feels like him and Kim are better without me, then let them be without me. I’m OK with that,” Pippen said on the Monday, November 9, episode of the “Hollywood Raw” podcast, before claiming that the Yeezy designer, 43, had “brainwashed” his wife and her sisters.Kim Kardashian Khloe Kardashian and Kourtney Kardashian in 2014 Larsa Pippen Says She Tested Positive for COVID-19 Amid Kardashian DramaKim Kardashian, Khloe Kardashian and Kourtney Kardashian attend the Grand Opening of DASH Miami Beach on March 12, 2014. Omar Vega/Invision/AP/Shutterstock- Advertisement – Though the details of their friendship’s demise raised eyebrows, the Kardashian family is “unbothered” by Larsa’s comments.“The family thinks Larsa spoke out about this now because she is craving attention,” a source told Us exclusively. “And the only attention she got as of late was from being Kim’s best friend and from being on the show.”Listen to Us Weekly’s Hot Hollywood as each week the editors of Us break down the hottest entertainment news stories! Earlier this year, fans noticed that the Skims founder was no longer following Pippen on Instagram after years of friendship. The Chicago native, who was previously married to Scottie Pippen for 21 years, had frequently appeared on Keeping Up With the Kardashians since falling in with the reality stars and their squad.As social media users wondered whether a feud was brewing, an insider told Us in July that Kim “wanted to reset” her account to focus on “her family and childhood friends.” Larsa, however, continued to accuse West of being the instigator behind the end of her friendship with Kim.“I didn’t feel any type of way. I just felt, like, do what’s best for your family,” she said of the KKW Beauty founder on Monday. “I love you, you and I are best friends, we’ve been through everything together, I would never do anything to jeopardize our relationship, we’re like sisters, we’re family, but if you have to unfollow me to make your home a better place, do it.”- Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

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EU gathers intelligence on pensions tracking as Germany rolls out platform

first_imgThe project will be presented at universities, as well as through advisers, and, in Switzerland, the board of university principals has recommended it to its member institutions.Wegner-Wahnschaffe said large Swiss pension funds such as Publica and schemes for the cantons of Bern and Zurich had already contributed information and factsheets. Finland and Spain are expected to join the platform in the near future, while Norway has expressed interest in integrating its own research staff.Wegner-Wahnschaffe said the platform would serve as “a first step in helping people to achieve the sort of pensions literacy that is vital for academic employees, as well as others”.However, within the European pensions industry – particularly in German – there have been some concerns regarding the possible introduction of an EU-wide pensions-tracking system and the collection of data connected with it. Meanwhile, the EU is stepping up efforts to prepare just such a service.At the annual PensionsEurope conference in Frankfurt, Titus Sips, a consultant at APG and one of the people responsible for the EU’s TTYPE project, confirmed the working group was currently looking into national pensions-tracking services.“In the end, we are going to come up with a design, looking into how a tracking service in Europe can be established,” he said.One of the systems he will be assessing is the ‘Pensionskonto’ in Austria.From next year, Austrians born after 1954 will be able to use the system to see what they can expect from the state pension.The Austrian supplementary pensions industry hopes the platform will serve as a wake-up call for people to start saving for their retirement.Sips added that TTYPE – short for ‘Track and trace your pension in Europe’ – is working with the actuarial association Groupe Consultatif, which issued a report on pensions-tracking services in October and is now preparing a survey of EU member states’ attitudes towards tracking systems. The German-initiated pensions platform for researchers is to be rolled out as a pilot project in Germany from early next year, as the EU steps up efforts to gather intelligence on national pensions-tracking systems, including one to be introduced imminently in Austria.‘Find your pension’ – a platform for academic researchers – will go live next year, having collected information on pension systems in 10 countries to date. Claudia Wegner-Wahnschaffe, project manager for the platform, told IPE: “That means we have so far covered almost 60% of those working in the education and research field in the public and university sectors within the EU and the EEA, according to Eurostat figures.“With a low budget, we managed to collect important information via our network but without the exchange of sensitive data.”last_img read more

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Technology shares lead third-quarter returns at Norway’s oil fund

first_imgNorway’s NOK7.1trn (€707bn) former oil fund, the Government Pension Fund Global (GPFG), saw its year-to-date investment returns rise markedly in the third quarter as equities – and particularly those in the technology sector – performed strongly.In its report for the third quarter, the GPFG confirmed preliminary numbers released earlier this month and said, in foreign currency terms, its investments had produced a 4% return between January and September.This was up from the returns seen in the first and second quarters of -0.63% and 1.27%, respectively, and brings the return for the first nine months of this year to 4.65%.Equity investments returned 6% and fixed income returned 0.9%, with returns for both these asset classes beating the benchmark by 0.2% in the quarter, according to Norges Bank Investment Management (NBIM), which runs the GPFG. Real estate investments, meanwhile, generated a 2.3% return in July to September, the first positive quarterly result produced by the asset class this year.Trond Grande, deputy chief executive, said: “Equity investments performed strongest during the quarter, with positive return in all regions.”He added that this was the main contributor to the fund’s result.Technology companies were the strongest performers in the third quarter, returning 13.5%.“Consumers are spending more time on their smartphones, and the sector was boosted by strong growth in e-commerce and digital advertising,” NBIM said.It said there had been further growth in new cloud-based IT services, as well as higher levels of investment in traditional hardware and software.It terms of the GPFG’s individual shareholdings, the fund’s shares in Apple contributed the most in the quarter, followed by HSBC Holdings and technology company Alphabet.Despite the investment return of NOK240bn in the third quarter, the fund’s value fell to NOK7.12bn at the end of September, down from NOK7.18bn at the end of June.NBIM explained that the Norwegian government withdrew NOK30bn from the fund between July and September, and that, in the same period, the fund’s value in Norwegian kroner shrank considerably because of the domestic currency’s strong rise on foreign exchanges, taking a NOK268bn hit.The GPFG only invests outside Norway.Some 60.6% of assets were invested in equities at the end of the third quarter, 36.3% in fixed income and 3.1% in real estate.last_img read more

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Government urged to ‘come clean’ about dashboard data approach [updated]

first_imgSir Steve Webb, partner at LCP and former pensions ministerIn the consultation paper, it said one of the Department for Work and Pension’s (DWP) design principles was that dashboards would initially be used for presentation purposes only, which meant that “initial dashboards cannot calculate projected pensions, meaning that providers/schemes must supply an ERI for each pension”.Webb noted that when the government first published its response to the consultation on the pensions dashboard, it said that in the first phase schemes would at maximum be asked for the information already available on annual statements or on request.“However,” he added in a blog post, “the crucial missing phrase which should have been added is ‘… and in a specified format’ and a multi-million pound bill could sit behind those innocent-sounding words.”“The pensions dashboard is a very important initiative, but the government needs to come clean about what is involved,” he said. “If it really intends the dashboard simply to be a cut-and-paste from existing statements, then the information on display will be utterly inconsistent between different pensions.“The pensions dashboard is a very important initiative, but the government needs to come clean about what is involved”Steve Webb, partner at LCP and former pensions minister“Assuming that this is not what is planned, schemes will instead have to do a huge amount of data manipulation to get data in a standardised format for the dashboard. The cost of this will be huge, especially where data is not currently well organised.”Webb noted that the Dashboard Programme team recognised the complexity of DB rights and suggested that each ‘tranche’ of ERI would be associated with a date at which the payment comes into force.However, this way of presenting data could be different to the way in which it was presented in annual statements, he said, and could further add to the cost of supplying data to the dashboard.DWP viewGuy Opperman, minister for pensions and financial inclusion, has urged pension schemes to participate in the Dashboard Programme’s data standards-related call for input, and to “be on the front foot and to get data ready as soon as possible”.”This Call for Input is another important step in bringing pensions into the digital age and ensuring that the record numbers of people saving for retirement are provided with the necessary information to make informed choices as they prepare for financial security in later life,” he wrote in July when the consultation was launched.A DWP spokesperson today said: ”The government has asked the Pensions Dashboards Programme to develop proposals on the data standards needed to best support consumers using pensions dashboards. Their call for input enables industry and consumer representative to set out their views which will be considered as the proposals on data standards for dashboards are developed.”The MaPS will develop a dashboard, but other organisations will also provide dashboards.This article was updated after publication with the addition of the DWP spokesperson comments.Looking for IPE’s latest magazine? Read the digital edition here. On the other hand, if data had to be standardised before it was sent to the dashboard, pension schemes and companies could face huge additional work costing millions of pounds, Webb argued.He cited “estimated retirement income” (ERI), a data point referred to by the Pensions Dashboard Programme, as a key example of data that would require additional data processing or calculations by pension schemes.The Dashboard Programme, set up by the Money and Pensions Service to develop the required standards, specifications and technical requirements for dashboards, addresses the ERI data point in two working papers on which it is consulting until 31 August. The UK government has been urged to provide greater clarity about its expectations for data to be supplied to the pensions dashboard, with LCP partner and former pensions minister Steve Webb warning of a potential “multi-million pound dashboard compliance bill”.According to Webb, the government has two options: pension schemes either “cut-and-paste” existing data onto the dashboard, or are required to supply data to the dashboard on new and standardised definitions.The problem with the former, according to Webb, was that data on the dashboard, an online portal displaying an individual’s pension information in one place, would be completely inconsistent.There was currently “huge” variation among both defined benefit (DB) and defined contribution schemes in the data supplied to members in statements, and many deferred DB members did not get regular statements at all, he said.last_img read more

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