Strategy Addressing Mental Illness OpEd

first_imgMany people have been touched by mental illness, either personally, or through a family member, friend or colleague. It doesn’t discriminate. Mental illness affects people of all ages, from all walks of life. As a former paramedic, I witnessed first-hand the effects that untreated and neglected mental health issues have on Nova Scotians’, their families and communities. I was called to homes on several occasions to bring children struggling with mental illness to the hospital for treatment. My thoughts were always the same: if these children had access to mental health treatment sooner, they would never have gotten to this point. As Minister of Health and Wellness, I am drawing upon those experiences to make significant and positive changes to the mental health services Nova Scotians receive. Earlier this year, the province issued its first mental health and addictions strategy, called Together We Can. The plan was developed with help from people who shared their personal experiences with mental health and addiction, family members of people with a mental illness and health care providers. Through this strategy, we will address the needs of all Nova Scotians, and implement services that will improve their quality of life. We know that all of the goals in the mental health and addictions strategy can’t be achieved overnight. But I am very proud to say that after only five months, we have begun to work on many of the strategy’s commitments. This month, the province is celebrating key milestones in our movement to strengthen mental health services across the province. We’ve added four health counselors and two mental health clinicians to every junior and senior high school in the South Shore board, and a new anti-bullying co-ordinator for schools across the province. This winter we look forward to: I encourage all Nova Scotians to challenge the common myths and misconceptions surrounding mental health. Reaching out to a member of your community who lives with a mental illness is a great way to begin breaking down those barriers and learning more about the many facets of mental health. -30- Putting mental health clinicians in SchoolsPlus families of schools across Nova Scotia to identify and treat mental health problems of children and youth earlier Expanding the Strongest Families program provincewide to provide telephone coaching to families that have children with behavioural and anxiety difficulties Reducing mental health service wait times to meet standards through new approaches Expanding the 1-800 toll-free crisis line across the province to ensure that people with mental health and addiction concerns can talk to someone immediately Expanding peer support to help people with mental illness transition successfully from the hospital to their community; Funding community agency projects that help Nova Scotians of all ages living with mental illness and addictions Working to remove the stigma associated with mental health disorders. last_img read more

Abrogation of Art 370 need of the hour Naidu

first_imgChennai: Vice President M Venkaiah Naidu on Sunday backed the scrapping of special status under Article 370 to Jammu and Kashmir, saying it was in the interest of the nation and should not be treated as a political issue. It was the need of the hour and people of the country should stand with their counterparts in J and K, he said here at the release of a book on his two-year term in office titled “Listening, Learning & Leading”, by Union Home Minister Amit Shah. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’Naidu said Shah was being appreciated for the passage of the bill. “Now that the bill is passed, I can speak…that (abrogation) is the need of the hour. Its a good thing,” Naidu, who is also the Chairman of the Rajya Sabha, said. Naidu said the abrogation “is in the interest of the nation, for its future, for its security, for its safety. I can say that as a Vice President with considerable experience in public life and now that the Parliament has voted it also.” Also Read – Farooq demands unconditional release of all detainees in J&K”We should all think in terms of national interest rather than party interest. Art 370 should not be treated as a political issue but as a national issue that Kashmir is an integral part of India,” he said. Whatever problems are faced by the people of Kashmir, we have to stand by them and “assuage their feelings and see to it that steps are taken to restore normalcy” and that the development agenda is implemented at the earliest, Naidu said. Referring to a newspaper report, he said Parliament had earlier discussed the scrapping of Art 370 in 1964, with three members from Kashmir calling for its removal saying the state did not benefit from it. Those who spoke on the bill included the veteran socialist leader Ram Manohar Lohia, he said citing the report. “So, irrespective of the parties, everybody supported the resolution at that time. Still it could not happen which is a different thing. Always you must remember history,” he added. The vice-president cited it to counter criticism that the abrogation happened suddenly. Naidu said he was gripped by “tension” when the bill came up for discussion on August 5 in the Rajya Sabha since he had to manage the affairs of the House.last_img read more

PM Trudeau to hold formal bilateral meeting with US VP Mike Pence

first_imgWASHINGTON – Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will hold a bilateral meeting with U.S. Vice-President Mike Pence later this week while they’re both visiting a conference of U.S. state governors.The event will be a formal sit-down.The men will be in Rhode Island for a gathering of more than three dozen governors, and there had been whispers that the Canadian delegation might spend time with a high-profile U.S. federal official.That official is Pence, a Canadian official has confirmed.Lest anyone read any political intrigue into the meeting with the man who is second in line to the U.S. presidency, the official stressed this event was arranged before the latest headlines involving President Donald Trump’s family contacts with Russians.“It was confirmed before this week’s revelations,” the official said.The special counsel investing Russian election meddling is now examining an exchange involving Donald Trump Jr. in a probe that has now expanded to touch Trump’s immediate family.The release of emails this week has shown that Trump’s son went into a meeting with a Russian lawyer last year hoping for dirt collected on Hillary Clinton, and being told it was gathered by the Russian government to help Trump.The outreach to a vice-president is not uncommon: former U.S. president Barack Obama’s vice-president, Joe Biden, was hosted at an official dinner in Ottawa late last year.With NAFTA negotiations approaching, Canada also has a strategy of reaching out to 11 politically important states — in the hope that, if trade talks hit a rough patch, their governors will advocate for continued open borders.Some of those governors will be in Rhode Island.Trudeau will deliver a speech and hold a more informal public exchange with the governors Friday.last_img read more

Some asylumseekers struggling to find housing after leaving shelters

first_imgMONTREAL – Some of the asylum-seekers who have recently crossed the Canada-U.S. border say they’re struggling to find a place to live once they leave government-run temporary shelters.Ahmed Iftikhar, 42, says he walked across the border from New York in late July with his wife and four children.Since then, he says they’ve been moved from one temporary shelter to another: first a hotel, then the Olympic Stadium, and now a former convent in the city’s Ahuntsic-Cartierville borough.The shelters have been set up to receive the surging number of asylum seekers who have been crossing into Quebec in recent weeks, but they are only intended as temporary housing.Asylum-seekers are generally expected to leave the shelters once they receive their first social assistance cheques, but several who spoke to The Canadian Press say that’s easier said than done.Iftikhar, who says he fled violence in Kashmir, says he’s walked as far as he can in every direction looking for an apartment, but hasn’t found anything to accommodate his family of five.He says authorities at the shelter gave him a one-week transit pass and a list of possible addresses to check out, but so far he hasn’t had any luck.“There is nobody to help,” he said as he watched his children play in a park near the shelter. “I want to leave here but I don’t know what to do.”Another asylum-seeker, who gave his age as 30 but did not want to give his name, said he crossed the border last week with $34 dollars in his pocket.He says he’s passed through 11 countries since leaving his native Haiti three years ago and decided to take a chance on a new life in Canada.He said he’s supposed to leave the shelter and find a new place to live by Aug. 20, but without a phone he isn’t sure how to find an affordable apartment, or a lawyer to help with his claim.“Six hundred or $700 dollars isn’t a lot to eat with, to sleep with,” he said outside a creole restaurant a block from the shelter where he’s been staying.Between Aug. 1 and Aug. 7 alone, 1,798 people showed up at an unofficial crossing from the U.S. into Quebec.In comparison, only 2,920 claims were filed in Quebec in all of 2015.So far the numbers show no sign of slowing.On Sunday, a spokeswoman for the armed forces said more tents were being set up at a temporary camp set up near the Lacolle border station to accommodate people waiting for processing.Lt. (Navy) Eliane Trahan said the camp’s capacity would more than double to 1,200 people, up from 500 last week.Many of those coming to Canada, like 30-year-old Marie-Junie Joseph, are originally from Haiti.In the United States, the Trump administration is considering ending a program that granted Haitians so-called “temporary protected status” following the massive earthquake that struck in 2010.Joseph said the threat of deportation drove her to leave North Carolina for Canada with her husband and daughter.“I came because the door is open here, because I heard Canada is open to immigrants” she said outside the Haitian restaurant in Montreal, her two-year-old daughter on her lap.Canada has already lifted its own moratorium on deportations to Haiti.Given the high volume of arrivals, many of the asylum-seekers now have several months to wait before their hearings before the hearings that will determine whether they can stay.Joseph, like the others, says her family hasn’t found an apartment yet.last_img read more

ACTOR ERIC MCCORMACKS CLOTHES UP FOR GRABS IN NORTH VAN SET SALE

first_imgAdvertisement Login/Register With: Advertisement Here’s your chance to literally step into the shoes of a celebrity.A North Vancouver warehouse will be in the spotlight this weekend during a set sale featuring mid-century modern décor, and clothes and accessories worn by the actors from the popular Netflix sci-fi series Travelers starring Eric McCormack.Designer suits worn by McCormack and his co-stars that normally cost $1,700-$2,000 will be up for grabs for $50-$100. One lucky scavenger will score the actual time machine itself from the show. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Twitter Advertisement Facebook Actor Eric McCormack stars in the sci-fi series Travelers. photo supplied, The Canadian Press/AP, Invision – Richard Shotwelllast_img read more

Filing Utility could face charges in California wildfires

first_imgSACRAMENTO, Calif. — California’s attorney general has told a federal judge it’s possible the state’s largest power utility, Pacific Gas & Electric Co., could face charges up to murder if investigators find reckless operation of power equipment caused any deadly wildfires in the past two years.The Sacramento Bee reports the brief is purely advisory, and any criminal charges would most likely be filed by county district attorneys, not the state.The opinion was submitted to a judge overseeing a criminal case involving a PG&E natural gas pipeline explosion that killed eight people in the San Francisco suburb of San Bruno in 2010.PG&E was convicted of violating federal pipeline safety laws, and the judge asked for the attorney general’s opinion on whether any wildfires constitute a probation violation.The company has until Monday to file its response.___Information from: The Sacramento Bee, http://www.sacbee.comThe Associated Presslast_img read more

UN atomic agency praises Belarus progress on nuclear power programme

The Integrated Nuclear Infrastructure Review (INIR), produced by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), makes 16 recommendations to the Government of Belarus, including revising its nuclear legislation to adequately address issues like radioactive waste, strengthening the regulatory body and framework for licensing, and developing comprehensive management systems for the nuclear project.“The report acknowledges Belarus’ strong expertise in radiation protection and environmental monitoring and recognizes that good coordination in the development of Belarus’ nuclear power programme is beneficial,” said the IAEA’s Deputy Director General, Alexander Bychkov, after delivering the report to the country’s Deputy Prime Minister Anatoly Tozik.The report also makes specific suggestions about Belarus’ infrastructure development activities, based on guidance contained in the IAEA Milestones in the Development of a National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power publication.“Belarus has already implemented some of the recommendations that we shared with them in June, and the Government plans to implement all the remaining ones,” said Mr. Bychkov “This shows that the country is taking the report seriously.”Belarus began considering nuclear power in the 1980s and recently renewed its efforts. The Concept of Energy Security of the Republic of Belarus, promulgated in September 2007, called for commissioning two nuclear power plant units by 2020. This year’s INIR mission to Belarus was the seventh mission conducted by the IAEA. Belarus has utilized two other IAEA services to help prepare its national nuclear program: an energy planning analysis from 2007 to 2010, and a nuclear energy system assessment from 2010 to 2011. read more

This Ramadan was harder than any I remember Sadiq Khan urges unity

first_imgLondon Mayor Sadiq Khan speaks at the Eid celebrations in Trafalgar Square on Sunday, encouraging Muslims to unite after a month of terror and tragedy in the capital. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img

White poppy sales soar as MP criticises disingenuous trend

Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Sales of controversial white poppies have soared, new figures reveal, as an MP has criticised the “disingenuous” trend for appropriating the traditional poppy symbol.The Peace Pledge Union (PPU), who make and produce the white poppy, have seen a 30 per cent increase in the number being sold compared to this time last year.With one week still to go until Remembrance Sunday, which will mark 100 years since the end of the First World War, the charity have overtaken last year’s total and sold 101,660 white poppies.If the trend continues, the number of white poppies distributed this year will surpass 125,000.The PPU, whose busiest year was in 2015 when they sold 110,000 of the alternative Remembrance symbols, put the money from the sales towards their educational pacifism programmes.The charity have had increased interest from Churches and schools, selling at least 60 white poppy school packs – more than double the number of orders that they received last year.Conservative MP and former British Army officer Johnny Mercer, who last week described white poppies as “attention seeking rubbish”, said: “If people want to wear a white poppy then that is up to them.”What I don’t like is this insinuation that these campaign groups just don’t like war so therefore [they] wear the white poppy because the red poppy is a celebration of war – I think it’s extremely disingenuous.“Every soldier I know wants peace. If you want to celebrate those aims, then you could literally pick any other symbol you liked rather than using a symbol that has been used to raised money for injured soldiers and their families for a long time.” Last week, Mr Mercer took to Twitter criticising white poppies, saying: “Ignore the wearers of them. If you don’t want to wear a poppy don’t bother; they fought and died so you could choose. But don’t deliberately try and hijack it’s symbolism for your own ends.”Commenting on the increased popularity of the white poppy this year, Symon Hill, the PPU’s co-ordinator, said: “We are very pleased with the response. We have been taken aback by the number of orders – it has been a pleasant surprise.”Mr Hill believes that the number of white poppy orders have increased for a variety of reasons, including the “rise of the far-right”.“There are people who are worried about the rise of nationalistic governments and far-right politics around the world. To counteract that, some people want to assert their compassion for others”, he said.Mr Hill also thinks that this year’s popularity stems from the PPU making a “bigger effort” to “change the misunderstanding” surrounding white poppies, adding: “We are not trying to insult the Remembrance of the British Armed Forces.”White poppies in no way take money away from charities supporting veterans – white poppy wearers often make donations to charities supporting veterans or other victims of war. Local groups selling white poppies often donate the funds raised to such charities.”The new figures revealing the increased popularity of the white poppy come two weeks after St John’s Ambulance announced that they are allowing their volunteers to wear it for the first time ever.The 141-year-old first-aid organisation changed their dress code ahead of the the centenary of the First World War armistice welcoming the PPU’s alternative poppy. read more

Mac App Store Hits One Million Downloads First Day

first_imgToday, Apple announced that over one million apps have been downloaded from the Mac App Store in the first day. Apparently, Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard users jumped on the chance to get some of the more than1,000 free and paid apps for their Macs. You can choose from apps in Education, Games, Graphics & Design, Lifestyle, Productivity, Utilities and other categories.“We’re amazed at the incredible response the Mac App Store is getting,” said Steve Jobs, Apple’s CEO. “Developers have done a great job bringing apps to the store and users are loving how easy and fun the Mac App Store is.” For more info about the Mac App Store, check out PCMag.com’s Apple’s Mac App Store: Hands On and 11 Great Software Deals in the Mac App Store.last_img read more

Obamacare sign-ups about 45% ahead of last year’s pace

first_imgWASHINGTON — Sign-ups for Affordable Care Act health plans are running more than 45 percent ahead of last year’s pace, according to government data released Wednesday.The numbers from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services come as Republican senators are pushing to pay for tax cuts by repealing the “Obamacare” requirement to carry coverage.The new figures show that nearly 1.5 million consumers picked a plan through Nov. 11, compared to just over 1 million from Nov. 1-12 last year, a period that had included one additional day for consumers to enroll.The latest data cover 39 states served by the HealthCare.gov website. The overall number of sign-ups is higher because states running their own health insurance markets are not counted in the HealthCare.gov data.The share of new customers for 2018 coverage stayed at about 23 percent, the report said.The Obama-era health law offers subsidized private insurance for people who don’t get coverage on the job. Sign-ups this year are being closely watched because of efforts by the Trump administration and the Republican-controlled Congress to do away with the law.last_img read more

Lucky Peach is in the Pits

first_imgUnlucky news for Lucky Peach readers, as the quarterly food magazine announced in a blog post today that it will fold. May will be its last regularly scheduled issue, followed by a “crazy double issue in fall.” The magazine reported a circulation of 100,000 as well as 720,000 monthly uniques, as of October 2015. The news, first reported by Eater, became public as staffers learned Monday that their employment will end in May. The brand’s fourth cookbook, “All About Eggs,” is due out in April. Lucky Peach was launched in 2011 by The New York Times food critic Peter Meehan and celebrity restauranteur and owner of Momofuku, Dave Chang, in conjunction with McSweeney’s. The magazine started out with a lot of hype — even David Carr was a fan — which it maintained as it transitioned into an independent magazine, and one of the most quirky but trusted food publications on the market (while maintaining its $28 subscription price).last_img read more

Chemical Weapons Team Is On Its Way To Syria Watchdog Group Says

first_img Share Omar Sanadiki/ReutersA bus carries rebels and their families who have fled Douma, Syria, the site of an alleged chemical attack over the weekend that killed dozensUpdated at 12:27 p.m. ETA fact-finding team from the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons is on its way to Syria and will begin working there by Saturday, spokesperson Johan de Wittlaan said Thursday.The team will investigate the recent killing of dozens of civilians in Douma in a horrifying attack over the weekend, in which Syrians were found to have died from suffocation in the city just outside Damascus.“I think it looks pretty clear that a chlorine weapon was used” on the civilians, said Charles Duelfer, former deputy head of the U.N. inspections team in Iraq, in an interview with NPR.When asked about expectations that the U.S. will launch a punitive strike on Syria over the attack, U.S. Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis said, “Some things are simply inexcusable — beyond the pale — and in the worst interests of not just the chemical weapons convention, but of civilization itself.”Syria and its main ally, Russia, have denied that any chemical weapons were used and gave permission for the OPCW to investigate.Confirmation of the fact-finding team’s trip comes after Russia said Douma had finally come under the government’s total control, after the last rebel group that had been fighting Syria’s regime there capitulated. As part of the takeover, Russia said, it will deploy military police in the city — a development that could lead to questions about the validity of the evidence of the attack.The U.S. and other nations have condemned Syria’s apparent use of a poisonous gas to attack Douma’s civilians, particularly because it occurred in an area that was supposed to have been off-limits to warplanes. Since the attack, President Trump has been engaged in a spat with Russia, which threatened to shoot down any U.S. missiles that might be launched against Syria in retaliation.Trump said Wednesday that the U.S. will strike Syria using missiles that are “nice and new and ‘smart!’ ” — ramping up expectations that an attack was imminent. But on Thursday, he tweeted, “Never said when an attack on Syria would take place. Could be very soon or not so soon at all!”As Trump has talked about ordering a new military strike on Syria, the regime led by President Bashar Assad has been busy. From Beirut, NPR’s Ruth Sherlock reports on preparations for a U.S. attack:“They’re thought to be moving planes and weapons to more secure locations. They’ve apparently evacuated a lot of the main airports and military bases. Air defenses are on high alert. And for the civilian population, there’s this kind of palpable sense of fear.“People in the capital Damascus were saying that they have been up into the early hours of each night waiting for a possible attack. And one person said, ‘You can cut the tension with a knife here.’ “Bassam Khabieh/ReutersA boy walks through war-torn Douma, Eastern Ghouta, outside of Damascus, Syria, last month. The onetime rebel stronghold is reportedly now under government controlDouma is just 6 miles northeast from the center of Damascus. It has been fought over since at least 2012, when government troops battled for control of both the city and the broader Eastern Ghouta region. Since that time, much of the rebel enclave has been under siege.The recent attack on Douma came after months of warnings that the “de-escalation zone” status of Eastern Ghouta had become “a farce,” as State Department spokesperson Heather Nauert said in February, when the U.S. accused Russia and Syria of carrying out attacks on civilians and targeting medical facilities.Thousands of people have fled Douma and Eastern Ghouta, desperate to find safety. In the past 12 days alone, 12,000 people left the city, Syria’s state news agency said. Across Eastern Ghouta, more than 165,000 people have left via secure corridors. Rebel groups made deals to secure their safety as they departed — many of them heading north for Idlib. Then came the news that the last holdout group, Jaysh al-Islam, had finally agreed to leave. Many of them also reportedly headed north to Aleppo.“Today marked a landmark event in Syria’s history,” said Yuri Yevtushenko, who heads the Russian Center for Reconciliation of the Opposing Parties in Syria. As reported by the state-run Tass news agency, Yevtushenko added that Syria’s official flag had now been hoisted over Douma, signaling control over Eastern Ghouta.Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

Researchers Identify Brain Circuits that Help People Cope with Stress

first_img Image courtesy of UTHealth McGovern Medical School News | Brachytherapy Systems | August 14, 2019 Efficacy of Isoray’s Cesium Blu Showcased in Recent Studies August 14, 2019 — Isoray announced a trio of studies recently reported at scientific meetings and published in medica read more Related Content News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | August 07, 2019 Contrast Use in First Transthoracic Echocardiogram for Heart Failure Reduces Repeat Testing Heart failure is the fourth most common cause for all admission to U.S. hospitals, and it is the most common reason for… read more Image courtesy of Imago Systems News | Artificial Intelligence | August 13, 2019 Artificial Intelligence Could Yield More Accurate Breast Cancer Diagnoses University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) researchers have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) system that… read more Technology | Interventional Radiology | August 16, 2019 Profound Medical Receives U.S. FDA 510(k) Clearance for Tulsa-Pro Profound Medical Corp. announced it has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to… read more News | Pediatric Imaging | August 14, 2019 Ultrasound Guidance Improves First-attempt Success in IV Access in Children August 14, 2019 – Children’s veins read more July 22, 2016 — Research supported by the National Institutes of Health has identified brain patterns in humans that appear to underlie “resilient coping,” the healthy emotional and behavioral responses to stress that help some people handle stressful situations better than others.People encounter stressful situations and stimuli everywhere, every day, and studies have shown that long-term stress can contribute to a broad array of health problems. However, some people cope with stress better than others, and scientists have long wondered why. The new study, by a team of researchers at Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, is now online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.“This important finding points to specific brain adaptations that predict resilient responses to stress,” said George F. Koob, Ph.D., director of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), part of NIH and a supporter of the study. “The findings also indicate that we might be able to predict maladaptive stress responses that contribute to excessive drinking, anger and other unhealthy reactions to stress.”In a study of human volunteers, scientists led by Rajita Sinha, Ph.D., and Dongju Seo, Ph.D., used a brain scanning technique called functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure localized changes in brain activation during stress. Study participants were given fMRI scans while exposed to highly threatening, violent and stressful images followed by neutral, non-stressful images for six minutes each. While conducting the scans, researchers also measured non-brain indicators of stress among study participants, such as heart rate and levels of cortisol, a stress hormone, in blood.The brain scans revealed a sequence of three distinct patterns of response to stress, compared to non-stress exposure. The first pattern was characterized by sustained activation of brain regions known to signal, monitor and process potential threats. The second response pattern involved increased activation, and then decreased activation, of a circuit connecting brain areas involved in stress reaction and adaptation, perhaps as a means of reducing the initial distress to a perceived threat.“The third pattern helped predict those who would regain emotional and behavioral control to stress,” said Sinha, professor of psychiatry and director of the Yale Stress Center.This pattern involved what Sinha and colleagues described as “neuroflexibility,” in a circuit between the brain’s medial prefrontal cortex and forebrain regions including the ventral striatum, extended amygdala and hippocampus during sustained stress exposure. Sinha and her colleagues explain that this neuroflexibility was characterized by initially decreased activation of this circuit in response to stress, followed by its increased activation with sustained stress exposure.“This seems to be the area of the brain which mobilizes to regain control over our response to stress,” said Sinha.The authors note that previous research has consistently shown that repeated and chronic stress damages the structure, connections and functions of the brain’s prefrontal cortex. The prefrontal cortex is the seat of higher order functions such as language, social behavior, mood and attention, and which also helps regulate emotions and more primitive areas of the brain.In the current study, the researchers reported that participants who did not show the neuroflexibility response in the prefrontal cortex during stress had higher levels of self-reported binge drinking, anger outbursts and other maladaptive coping behaviors. They hypothesize that such individuals might be at increased risk for alcohol use disorder or emotional dysfunction problems, which are hallmarks of chronic exposure to high levels of stress.In addition to NIAAA, the study was supported by the NIH Common Fund, the National Institute on Drug Abuse, and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.For more information: www.pnas.org FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享center_img News | Neuro Imaging | August 16, 2019 ADHD Medication May Affect Brain Development in Children A drug used to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) appears to affect development of the brain’s… read more News | Mammography | August 14, 2019 Imago Systems Announces Collaboration With Mayo Clinic for Breast Imaging Image visualization company Imago Systems announced it has signed a know-how license with Mayo Clinic. The multi-year… read more News | Neuro Imaging | July 22, 2016 Researchers Identify Brain Circuits that Help People Cope with Stress Subjects who responded better to stress demonstrated improved “neuroflexibility” of affected brain regions News | Radiation Therapy | August 15, 2019 First Patient Enrolled in World’s Largest Brain Cancer Clinical Trial Henry Ford Cancer Institute is first-in-the-world to enroll a glioblastoma patient in the GBM AGILE Trial (Adaptive… read more News | Stroke | August 16, 2019 Mobile Stroke Unit Gets Patients Quicker Treatment Than Traditional Ambulance Every second counts for stroke patients, as studies show they can lose up to 27 million brain cells per minute…. read more Technology | Neuro Imaging | August 07, 2019 Synaptive Medical Launches Modus Plan With Automated Tractography Segmentation Synaptive Medical announced the U.S. launch and availability of Modus Plan featuring BrightMatter AutoSeg. This release… read more Images of regions of interest (colored lines) in the white matter skeleton representation. Data from left and right anterior thalamic radiation (ATR) were averaged. Image courtesy of C. Bouziane et al.last_img read more

Mindray Introduces the Resona 7 Premium Ultrasound System

first_img Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Find more SCCT news and videos Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Molecular Imaging View all 22 items AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Find more news and videos from AAPM. Conference Coverage View all 396 items Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Recent Videos View all 606 items Mindray Introduces the Resona 7 Premium Ultrasound SystemLeveraging ZONARE’s revolutionary ZONE Sonography Technology with Mindray’s extensive workflow/user interface features, the Resona 7 is poised to become the industry leader in premium ultrasound.Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 2:43Loaded: 6.12%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -2:43 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Find more SCCT news and videos Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Technology Reports View all 9 items center_img Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Information Technology View all 220 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Leveraging ZONARE’s revolutionary ZONE Sonography Technology with Mindray’s extensive workflow/user interface features, the Resona 7 is poised to become the industry leader in premium ultrasound. For more information go to www.mindray.com/en/productlist/Ultrasound-Zonare.html. Women’s Health View all 62 items Find more SCCT news and videos Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiology Imaging View all 288 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Sponsored Content | Videos | Ultrasound Imaging | December 08, 2016 Mindray Introduces the Resona 7 Premium Ultrasound System last_img read more

A smashing Team USA goal and 9 more photos from Day 5

first_img Facebook Comments Lindsay Fendt/The Tico Times Luis Acosta/AFP Jewel Samad/AFP Carl De Souza Emmanuel Dunnand/AFP Related posts:US soccer legend Landon Donovan left off World Cup roster A flying header, plus 15 other awesome photos from Day 2 of the World Cup Wild World Cup morning: Suárez gets four month suspension; two Ghana stars kicked off team; flooding in Recife before US-Germany 25 photos from Costa Rica’s all-night-long celebration after the Ticos beat Greece Group F: Iran vs. NigeriaNeither Iran or Nigeria’s Super Eagles impressed in the World Cup’s first tie — a scoreless one at that. Here are the best shots from all of Monday’s games. See the full schedule for the group stage of the World Cuphere.Group G: Germany vs. PortugalMany anticipated that this would be one of the best games of the week, instead the Germans turned it into a blowout, 4-0 win. Portugal played most of the game down a man after defender Pepe’s moronic headbutt of Germany’s Thomas Müller. Lindsay Fendt/The Tico Times Group G: Ghana vs. United StatesThe U.S.’s 2-1 victory finally purged the curse of Ghana, the team that had eliminated the Stars and Stripes from the previous two World Cup. Captain Clint Dempsey scored for the United States just 35 seconds into the match, but Ghana controlled possession for most of the match and finally equalized at the 82 minute. Four minutes later, a clutch header by John Brooks allowed the U.S. to steal the win.. Javier Soriano/AFP Francois Xavier Marit/AFPlast_img read more

5 Comments  

first_img 5 Comments   Share   “He’s been as advertised and then some,” Pettine said.  “He’s a heck of a football player and an even better person, very genuine, very passionate about football.  He loves to compete.  That shows up in how he plays.  He’s almost a little reckless, too reckless sometimes, and takes some unnecessary hits.“Guys just gravitate to him.  You talk about quarterbacks having an ‘it’ factor.  He’s got it.”On the season, McCown is completing 66.8 percent of his passes with eight touchdowns and three interceptions.  He’s also rushed for 68 yards and a score.But for all the starts and stops in his career, it’s the start in Arizona that McCown remembers most fondly.“Just those guys, coming into the league and being rookies with Damien Anderson, Preston Parsons, Jason McAddley and the guys that I came in with; just realizing the childhood dream that you have.  I think I’ll always remember that.  Obviously, a kid growing up in Texas, playing with Emmitt Smith and being there when he finished his career was special too,” he said.“Last week, I ran into Coach (Dave) McGinnis; just will always appreciate his passion, my first head coach, and he and that group of people selected me and put me on that team and helping me realize a dream and how much that means to me.  Those are the things I think about when I think back.” Cleveland Browns quarterback Josh McCown throws to a receiver in the second half of an NFL football game against the Baltimore Ravens, Sunday, Oct. 11, 2015, in Baltimore. Cleveland won 33-30 in overtime. (AP Photo/Gail Burton) “We run in some same circles sometimes so I see him.  So it’s hard not to think about that play and that time with him.”McCown played two more seasons in Arizona prior to his release in 2006.From there, McCown made stops — in order — in Detroit, Oakland, Miami, Carolina, Hartford (of the United Football League), San Francisco, Chicago and Tampa Bay, before finally landing this season in Cleveland, where he’s 1-5 as a starter.“It’s been a crazy ride and I’m very thankful,” he said on a conference call with Arizona media. “I don’t know if I would change a whole lot of it, because I feel like some of who I am and my family and who we are has been borne out of going through some of these things.  I’m thankful for it, as crazy as it is.  It’s been good.”Sunday, the ride continues with McCown facing, for the first time as a starter, the team that took a chance on a young quarterback out of Sam Houston State some 13 years earlier.McCown, 36, is expected to make his 56th career start and 80th appearance in the NFL, that is if healthy.The Browns held McCown out of practice Wednesday with a right shoulder injury he appeared to suffer when he ran out of bounds and into a sideline retaining wall in last week’s loss at St. Louis. Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impact Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelo Top Stories Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling “On that play, it felt like I was already out of bounds and somebody pushed me in the back and I just kept going,” he said.  “I was trying to get slowed down and then I hit the concrete over there.  I slid into the bleachers there.  I hit my forearm on the pole, but that has nothing to do with where any of my injuries came from.  That was just annoying.”If McCown can’t go, then the Browns might turn to Johnny Manziel; though that, too, is a question mark.Manziel is currently under NFL investigation for a potential personal conduct policy violation after his girlfriend alleged that Manziel hit her and pushed her face against a car window while the two were driving together on Oct. 12.“I know that a meeting with him is imminent,” head coach Mike Pettine said.  “I don’t know enough about who they’ve talked to and where they are in their process of giving us some feedback on how they want to move forward with it.”Over the past five games, McCown is averaging more than 300 passing yards (327.4) with a total of 1,637 yards, which ranks second in the league during that span.McCown is leading the NFL with a 128.4 rating on third down and is tied for fifth with three 300-yard passing games. TEMPE, Ariz. — It’s been 10 years, and nearly as many different teams, since quarterback Josh McCown last wore an Arizona Cardinals uniform.Drafted in the third round (81st overall) back in 2002, McCown started 22 games in four seasons.Start number-three, however, is the one many remember the most, himself included.“Ironically, Nate Poole probably lives five miles from me in Charlotte,” he said, referring to his game-winning touchdown pass to Poole with no time left on the clock, which knocked Minnesota out of the playoffs in the season’s final week in 2003.last_img read more

by The Associated Press Posted Dec 3 2018 53

first_img by The Associated Press Posted Dec 3, 2018 5:30 am PDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email Pence wife and daughter plan more Marlon Bundo storiescenter_img NEW YORK — The wife and daughter of Vice-President Mike Pence plan more stories about the family bunny, Marlon Bundo.The conservative publisher Regnery announced Monday that it had a deal with Pence’s wife, Karen, and daughter, Charlotte, for two more picture books featuring Marlon. As with the bestselling “Marlon Bundo’s Day in the Life of the Vice-President,” a portion of the authors’ proceeds will be donated to charities fighting human trafficking and supporting art therapy. The two new books are both scheduled for next year.The first Bundo book inspired a gay-themed spoof by the staff of HBO host John Oliver that sold hundreds of thousands of copies. Even Charlotte Pence said she bought one, noting that Oliver was also donating money to charity, including one seeking to end AIDS.The Associated Presslast_img read more

55 Football Nations – for the love of the game

first_imgBy Leo LeonidouAN English football fan is taking his love for the beautiful game to new levels with an epic journey across Europe.Matt Walker aims to be the first person to experience top division league football in all 55 Uefa countries in one season, with 55footballnations.com showcasing his ongoing travels.“I wanted to take a break from my normal life and do something involving football, travel and a challenge,” explains the 40-year-old British justice ministry statistician. “I thought up the idea around Christmas 2015 and then started planning and saving money.”Walker began his sporting odyssey with the Dila Gori v Lokomotiv Tbilisi match in Georgia last June, and plans to conclude his journey by May of this year with a flying visit to Montenegro. In between, he is taking in matches in countries as diverse as the Faroe Islands, Ukraine, Albania and, of course, Cyprus – which is the 36th leg in his journey.On the island at the end of last month to attend matches hosted by Apoel, Doxa, and Ermis, Walker has already become the stuff of sporting legend, appearing in the media in almost 30 countries, and featured in The Guardian, BBC Sport, La Gazzeta dello Sport and L’Equipe.But despite the coverage, the Fulham fan is completing his entire mission without sponsorship or media contracts of any type. “I actually think this helps keep the project fresh and real. I make all my own decisions. They aren’t always the right ones. But they’re mine!”Ultimately, the goal is a book: “An exciting narrative that will probably be published in the middle of 2019; a book based on this potent fusion of creaking trains and strained limbs; I’m 6 foot 6 and my legs are still recovering from endless minibuses hurtling around Georgia, Azerbaijan and Armenia in the Caucasus!”Here in Cyprus, the experience has been a little tamer. Europe’s biggest football fan attended three local matches – Doxa Katokopias v Alki Oroklini, Apoel v AEK Larnaca, and Ermis Aradippou v Olympiakos Nicosia – and found the time to speak to Sunday Mail about his fascinating journey… Why only Uefa nations?The 55 Uefa nations worked nicely within one year. It offered an amazing contrast of landscapes, cultures and football styles. The other confederations are already on my mind for future challenges! How do you decide which fixtures to attend?I’m always looking for an interesting story. I visited IFK Mariehamn from the Aland Islands – shock 2016 Finnish champions despite travelling by ferry to every away game – and the incendiary derby between Cracovia and Wisla in Poland. I chose AFC Bournemouth because of their interesting rise up the English league system.I do try to avoid the big cities – 55 Football Nations isn’t about watching Real Madrid, Bayern Munich or Juventus – where possible. But naturally it sometimes comes down to logistics: who is playing in the nearest location or at the most convenient time. It’s much easier in smaller countries. I’ve seen multiple matches in Cyprus and also in Israel, Belarus, Iceland and Denmark. But my minimum is one top division league match in each of the 55 Uefa nations.” How do you interact with the fans?My usual tactic is turning up really early at the stadium! It worked best in countries like Scotland, Belarus and Moldova where the hardened support arrive the earliest, often to have a beer – which sadly isn’t possible in Cyprus. I explain I’ve chosen their team, normally over bigger rivals, as part of my project. The fans are mostly very welcoming, letting me to stand and sing with them, telling me great stories, buying me drinks and inviting me to future fixtures which, sadly, I can never attend.I normally sit or stand with the home fans, though not always with the hardcore support. It’s good to get different perspectives when you watch so many games. I’ve been bouncing with Brondby and Trabzonspor behind the goal and watched from good seats in the main stand at Borussia Monchengladbach and KAA Gent. As a Fulham fan, I gave up my season ticket for this challenge. I almost always get behind the home team on my football travels. But I only really have one team!”“The unexpected media coverage has also opened doors. I’ve spoken directly to host clubs in Bulgaria, Romania and Ukraine where the language barrier made it difficult to speak to fans. It doesn’t always work. I tried to contact Doxa, Apoel and Ermis –- none of the clubs responded to my messages! How do you feel the standard of play in Cyprus compares with that of other countries?I would put the league roughly on the same level as Romania or Israel. I saw several matches in those countries and both have similar patterns of play, with decent technical players and passing football. There is also a chasm between the top teams and the rest. The Cyprus national team has never qualified for a major international tournament. Any suggestions?International football success is very much dependent on population and affluence. You will get an Iceland, Latvia, Northern Ireland or Slovenia every so often, especially with the expanded Euros, but it’s always going to be tough for Cyprus with its population of around one million against the major nations.You need to get more Cypriots playing more minutes of football. There are probably more foreign players in Cyprus – 20 of the starting 22 at Apoel v AEK – than any other Uefa nation. And the football association needs to do more, within EU regulations, to encourage clubs to pick Cypriot players rather than foreigners who, whilst adding professionalism, undeniably hinder the national team. Football hooliganism, corruption, and match-fixing are recognised issues in Cyprus. How does the island compare to other countries in these respects?I have heard of hooliganism incidents in Cyprus – the ball boy injured by a firecracker was a very sad story – but fortunately saw no problems at the matches I attended. I would have been surprised if there were any issues at Doxa or Ermis given the low attendance (approximately 130 and 250) at these matches.I can’t really comment (on corruption and match-fixing). I know there have been problems in Cyprus, but also Turkey, Latvia, Lithuania, Finland and Sweden in recent years. The tremendous goals at all three of the top division matches I saw in Cyprus would be difficult to mock. Do you travel from place to place or head home in between?“A mixture of both. My longest trip has been five-and-a-half weeks through eight football nations: Sweden, Finland, Estonia, Kazakhstan, Russia, Belarus, Lithuania and Latvia. I will be on the road for over two thirds of the year, but it’s good to go home, write up my notes and do some washing.It can also be affordable, as London is a great transport hub – it was much cheaper to fly from Larnaca to Malta, my next football nation, via London than directly.My long-term girlfriend is also a fan of international football. She loves the project and visited me in Turkey and Latvia. She’s been with me to the Africa Cup of Nations in Ghana, Euro 2016 and will also be at the World Cup in Russia.” Where have you experienced the most challenging bureaucratic issues?Russia. The visa process is expensive and time-consuming. The Russian Embassy in London even called me to check why I was visiting two cities not on the usual St Petersburg-Moscow route! I did meet some friendly fans and had a good week there, but it was more challenging than most countries, especially with only a hundred words of Russian. Which of the matches you’ve attended were the most memorable?My match in Kosovo was a blast. Drita were 3-1 ahead in the unlikely city of Gjilan. Liria scored two goals in the last ten minutes to make it 3-3 before Drita forced an injury time winner. The Drita management invited me out to celebrate with the team afterwards. Great times!Then there was the match between match between Vitebsk and Krumkachy in Belarus. It was a grey day and I expected a dull match. Vitebsk were 2-1 up after 11 minutes. But the real drama was in the second half when Krumkachy goalkeeper Kostyukevich scored from his own penalty area. And was then sent off 20 minutes later for a professional foul. It somehow ended 2-2! For more information on Walker’s journey, visit www.55footballnations.com You can also follow his adventures on: facebook.com/55FootballNationsinstagram.com/55FootballNationstwitter.com/55FtballNations You May LikeThrone: Free Online GamesIf You’re Over 40 And Own A Computer, This Game Is A Must!Throne: Free Online GamesUndoDr. Marty ProPower Plus Supplement3 Dangerous Foods People Feed Their Dogs (Without Realizing It)Dr. Marty ProPower Plus SupplementUndoPopularEverythingColorado Mom Adopted Two Children, Months Later She Learned Who They Really ArePopularEverythingUndo Turkish Cypriot actions in Varosha ‘a clear violation’ of UN resolutions, Nicosia saysUndoConcern over falling tourism numbersUndoPensioner dies after crash on Paphos-Polis roadUndoby Taboolaby Taboolalast_img read more

Registration underway for traditional fig and almostforgotten cheese

first_imgA procedure for registering the products of a traditional white fig and a largely-forgotten cheese called Halitzia from the Tylliria region is underway, Agriculture Minister Nicos Kouyialis has said.The project, which aims at receiving an application for either a Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) or a Protected Geographical Indication (PGI) certification, is being developed in cooperation with the state technical university (Tepak).Kouyialis, in answer to a question from Green MP Giorgos Perdikis, explained what will happen when the application is approved.“With regard to encouraging the production and marketing of products after their registration as PDO or PGI, stakeholders can use specific measures of the Rural Development Programme,” he said.One of the aids available under the EU programme is the amount of €600,000 for primary production, which will cover 40 to 70 per cent of the expenditure, and another €500,000 is given for establishing processing units. This amount is expected to cover 40 per cent of the costs.The support for young farmers aged 18 to 40, a lump sum of €20,000, is also expected to be used, as is a training and skills development programme for both established and young farmers.More money is available from the EU for farmers who participate in the scheme during the first five years and for advertising and promotion.The university’s part is to determine the technical specifications of the cheese, while a private company and the communities are looking into finding out more about the history of the products.According to Fotis Papadimas, assistant professor at Tepak’s dairy science and technology department, the Halitzia project is just beginning.“The technical part which is what the university investigates might be ready in a few months but when everything has been put together it will be sent to the ministry which is going to form a committee. They will look at it and maybe ask for clarifications and more analysis might be needed,” he said.Knowledge about the cheese, which was originally made in Tillyria in the Pyrgos region and Tsakkistra in Nicosia, has been handed down orally through the generations.The white cheese matures for at least 40 days in whey-brine. It has a sour, moderately salty taste and is slightly crumbly with holes.Tillyria is also known for its traditional white figs which are consumed fresh, are dried and can be made into a paste.A fig pie or Sykopitta is part of a yearly summer festival in the village which promotes both the dairy product and the fruit.You May LikeDr. Marty ProPower Plus Supplement3 Dangerous Foods People Feed Their Dogs (Without Realizing It)Dr. Marty ProPower Plus SupplementUndoPopularEverythingColorado Mom Adopted Two Children, Months Later She Learned Who They Really ArePopularEverythingUndoSecurity SaversWindows Users Advised To Do This TodaySecurity SaversUndo Turkish Cypriot actions in Varosha ‘a clear violation’ of UN resolutions, Nicosia saysUndoConcern over falling tourism numbersUndoPensioner dies after crash on Paphos-Polis roadUndoby Taboolaby Taboolalast_img read more