Making an Impact on the Silicon Slopes

first_imgLocal Industry Associations – We work closely with the Utah Technology Council, our local high-tech industry association. Together we have created programs like Curiosity Unleashed, a STEM initiative to encourage students, parents, and educators to develop skills that are in high demand in the tech industry. Last Friday, I had the privilege of hosting U.S. Senator Orrin Hatch at the EMC Utah Center of Excellence (CoE). Senator Hatch spoke on the state of Utah as a technology leader and noted EMC’s advancements in the enterprise technology industry:“EMC is providing the type of jobs and critical technology needed to help keep our country ahead of the technology curve. The company invests in its people and the communities in which it operates, while also providing leading solutions for Cloud Computing, Big Data, and Cybersecurity. Today’s visit to EMC’s Utah office showcased the great work that is being done to help keep our state’s technology industry at the forefront of the global economy.”ShareMore than 1,000 EMC employees are based at the Utah Center of Excellence (CoE), working on a variety of IT-as-a-Service projects such as setting up Hadoop-as-a-Service so that customers can do faster Big Data analytics.The CoE is right in the middle of a new tech corridor becoming known as the Silicon Slopes. Much like what exists in the Bay Area of California, but unique to our mountainous geography. Many of us believe we enjoy a higher quality of life than in California and combined with a vibrant, well-educated workforce and infrastructure investments like Google Fiber, we’re driving substantial growth in Utah’s tech sector.EMC isn’t the only company out here either. There is also Adobe, whose Digital Marketing business is based in Utah, and IM Flash, an Intel-Micron JV that produces a vast amount of the NAND flash memory used in consumer electronics like the Apple iPhone, just to name a couple.You can’t just show up on the Slopes and reap the benefits though. There are three areas that have been key to our success so far:Government Relations – Relationships with state and local governments have been critically important. Together we have created programs like the Engineering and Computer Science Initiative that provides substantial funds to increase the number of engineering graduates from Utah universities. And when those relationships are backed by strong partnerships at the national level with people like Senator Hatch the benefits are extended to the entire tech industry. Higher Education Partnerships – We also have strong relationships with the three largest universities in the state: University of Utah, Utah Valley University and Brigham Young University. They provide continuing education to our employees and we hire many of their graduates.On top of this, employees are driving several other partnerships that benefit both our company and the local community, such as the working with the Utah Food Bank and the Salt Lake Valley Science & Engineering Fair.When all of these factors come together, you get results – like the ability to expand business presence – not to mention continued attention from public figures like Senator Hatch who influence key issues like patent reform, corporate tax reform, immigration reform, and cybersecurity.Thanks again to the Senator and all of the other partners who have been part of our journey at EMC in Utah!I hope to see you here soon on the Silicon Slopes.last_img read more

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Bringing Opportunity to OEMs

first_img Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 2:05Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVERemaining Time -2:05 Playback Rate1ChaptersChaptersdescriptions off, selectedDescriptionssubtitles off, selectedSubtitlescaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedCaptionsen (Main), selectedAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window.Caption Settings DialogBeginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsDefaultsDoneClose Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. How OEMS can Unlock New Revenue Streams by Leveraging Software Design and Monetizing Customer DataThanks to digital transformation, application workload continues to increase exponentially. As an OEM, you and your customers must be multi-cloud ready and capable of connecting as part of a system of intelligent systems. Having an architecture that can handle a massive amount of data is critical to success.In my view, a dual approach is the only way to go. Hyperconvergence integrates multiple system components into a single integrated turnkey solution while a software-defined storage array allows you to leverage a range of capabilities across different hardware platforms.This approach truly offers the best of both worlds, allowing you to build appliances to meet your customers’ needs across multiple vertical industries. Key benefits include increased resiliency and scalability.I believe that 2020 is a time of unprecedented opportunity for OEMs. With the right partner and architecture, you can develop innovative solutions to unlock new revenue streams and monetize customer data.Dell Technologies OEM | Embedded & Edge Solutions understand the complexities of the OEM marketplace and can help you innovate faster.If you’d like to learn more, please read this technical brief on why a software-defined approach is important for solution designers and watch the video below. Follow us on Twitter @delltechoem and join our LinkedIn Dell Technologies OEM | Embedded & Edge Solutions Showcase page here.last_img read more

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Dwayne Johnson is a contender in NBC sitcom ‘Young Rock’

first_imgLOS ANGELES (AP) — Dwayne Johnson’s new NBC comedy “Young Rock” is a coming-of-age story inspired by his challenging childhood and youth. The story is framed by the adult Johnson’s reflections on his life as he makes a fictional run for president in the year 2032. Johnson says the approach was designed to give him an ongoing role in the comedy, which debuts in February on NBC. “Young Rock” recounts what Johnson faced before becoming a famous pro wrestler and then film and TV star and producer. Johnson declined to say if he might be preparing America for his real-life run for president someday.last_img read more

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EU tightens vaccine export rules, creates post-Brexit outcry

first_imgBRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union has introduced tighter rules on exports of coronavirus vaccines that could hit shipments to nations like the United Kingdom amid a deepening dispute with drugmaker AstraZeneca over supplies of potentially lifesaving shots. The measure created an outcry Friday in Northern Ireland and the UK, amid fears it would trigger controls on vaccines shipments produced in the 27-nation bloc to the small territory that is part of United Kingdom and borders the EU’s Ireland. Under the post-Brexit deal, EU products should still be able to travel unhindered from the bloc to Northern Ireland. The EU later made clear it won’t introduce controls on vaccines to Northern Ireland.last_img read more

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Tanzania says no plans in place to accept COVID-19 vaccines

first_imgDODOMA, Tanzania (AP) — Tanzania’s health ministry says it has no plans in place to accept COVID-19 vaccines, just days after the president of the country of 60 million people expressed doubt about the vaccines without offering evidence. Tanzania’s government has been widely criticized for its approach to the pandemic. It has not updated its number of coronavirus infections _ 509 _ since April. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in its latest travel warning on Tanzania says the country’s level of COVID-19 is “very high.” It gave no details but urged against all travel to the East African nation.last_img read more

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Florida police search for car stolen while carrying vaccine

first_imgPLANT CITY, Fla. (AP) — Florida police are investigating the theft of a car that was carrying $10,000 worth of COVID-19 vaccine. The Plant City Police Department said Thursday that it is searching for a man suspected of having stolen the vehicle with 30 vials inside. The police report says the car had been left unlocked with the engine running by a driver who worked for a contractor that provides logistical support. Contractor CDR Maguire says the driver had gotten out of the car to find a security guard to allow him to enter the site. The company says it has no reason to believe the thief knew the vials were in the car.last_img read more

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Students teach fifth graders

first_img Hunter said her students were excited for the field trip, but they relaxed once they were placed in smaller groups with the engineering students. John Enszer, an instructor in the First Year Engineering Department, said he hopes I2D2 becomes an annual event.  “The kids like anything where they get to make something or work with something,” Karen Hunter, a South Bend teacher, said. “It’s exciting for them to see projects from start to finish.” “I can’t wait until I get to go to school here,” said Pangallo. “This is a day in class for us right now, just sitting her playing LEGOs with you,” freshman Erik Jenson said to students. The older students were able to act as mentors to the youth, who learned about energy and motion as well as how scientists and engineers design, build and test their experiments. After experiencing a day like this, students like Pangallo think college must be cool and it gets that thought in the back of their mind. The students participated in the Irish Pet Project and the 2010 Domer Freewheeling Derby. The activities had students brainstorming ideas for robotic pets and building and racing LEGO vehicles. “My favorite part of today was building and racing a car,” fifth grader Martha Alsip said. “It was really cool.” As an outreach project to get more involved with local South Bend youth, the College of Engineering first-year students held a technological discovery day called “I2D2—Imagination, Innovation, Discovery and Design at Notre Dame.”center_img The event was held Friday at Stepan Center and welcomed nearly 350 students from the South Bend Community School Corporation to campus. The afternoon aimed at answering two questions engineers deal with most: “Why do things work the way they do?” and “How do we make them work better?”  “It’s important for the kids to be able to visualize what they’re learning,” she said. “They very much look up to them.” For part of the afternoon, the engineers and fifth-graders broke into small groups to work with LEGOs and  to give the youth a chance to talk with the older students about anything from building a LEGO coconut to what it’s like to go to college. “Today is really fun, but playing with the LEGOs is the best part,” fifth grader Taylor Pangallo said.  Hunter said it is more than an educational field trip to the students.  “It’s an ongoing incentive to go to college,” she said.  “It’s exciting to have fifth graders talking to college kids,” he said. “It’s a chance for them to meet role models and it’s a chance for Notre Dame students to interact with the community.”  last_img read more

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Union protests outside hiring

first_imgWhen a group of local union members began picketing in September in front of her soon-to-open Kilwin’s Chocolates & Ice Cream at Eddy Street Commons, Tricia Wainscott wondered why. “When I first saw the protesters, I felt horrible,” Wainscott, general manager of the store, said. “My initial reaction was to ask, ‘Why is this going on? What did we do?’” The protests came in response to Kilwin’s choice to use outside workers instead of union workers from the South Bend area, which did not help stimulate the local economy, said Troy Warner, assistant business manager of Local Union 153. Starting Sept. 23, several Local 153 members began picketing at Eddy Street twice a week in support of local workers, Warner said. The group held up signs that read, “Honk for local workers,” in hopes of raising awareness of the issue at hand. “We want the community and Kite Realty to know what’s going on, and we want to put pressure on Kilwin’s because another building at Eddy Street has yet to be developed,” Warner said. “We felt that this was the right time and the right place to get the message out.” But Wainscott said the Kilwin’s franchise, based in Michigan, chose the general contractor for the project without her individual input. “I would never not support non-union or non-local labor,” Wainscott said. “It was nothing personal, and it was all said and done before I knew anything had happened.” Although the general contractor was not locally based, Wainscott said local workers were employed in the installation of the store’s audio, security and fire alarm systems. The decision was also made without the influence of Kite Realty Group, which owns the Eddy Street Commons development, said Ashley Bedell, a project manager with Kite who worked on the Eddy Street project. She said each individual retailer has options when it comes to developing the space they rent. “We own the overall buildings, but when we do leases with individual retailers, they have the option of taking the space in a shell condition and hiring their own contractors to complete the buildout,” Bedell said. “The amount of work Kite does determines what the rental rate is, so it’s part of the business deal, and it varies from tenant to tenant.” Bedell said Kite has the power to control whether the development’s tenants choose contractors that complete quality work, and the general contractor for the Kilwin’s space, Indianapolis-based Alt Construction, has a history of completing quality developments. Bedell also said some union contractors were employed in the construction of the larger buildings at Eddy Street Commons. Warner said Kilwin’s use of a non-local general contractor did not support the struggling local economy or help to improve the unemployment rate of the members of Local 153, which he said hovered around 25 percent for the past year. “The unemployment rate in my union will probably get up to 30 or 35 percent this winter,” Warner said. “But this isn’t just a problem at Eddy Street. As the economy has tanked and construction has slowed, we’ve been seeing workers brought in from all over who are taking jobs from local workers.” So far, Warner said the public response to the protests has improved since the pickets first began. “The first week or so, people would just look at us as they drove by,” Warner said. “Now that we’ve been out there, they know why we’re there and they honk and wave, and some people even brought us food and coffee. “The reception from the public has been tremendous.” But Bedell said there have been no complaints from any of the other Eddy Street Commons retailers. “It’s an unfortunate situation and we wish it wasn’t the case, but it doesn’t cause too much of a disturbance,” Bedell said. Jay Murphy, manager of Kildare’s Pub, which is adjacent to Kilwin’s, has only noticed minor effects on his business because of the protests. “The only kickback we’ve gotten is that we got a call from a few suppliers who were double-checking that the workers were not protesting Kildare’s,” Murphy said. Warner believes the positive response from the community is important because it emphasizes the support for workers who are part of the South Bend community. “We need to support workers who pay taxes here, go to church here, whose kids go to school here,” Warner said. “It makes sense to keep as much money in the community so it can churn back through local businesses.”last_img read more

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Seniors head to Peace Corps

first_imgNotre Dame ranked 18th among medium-sized schools this year to send the most volunteers to serve in the group, according to a University press release. The University jumped five spots on the list from last year as the Peace Corps prepares to mark its 50th anniversary, the release said. Notre Dame was included on this list for the past 11 years. Peace Corps recruiter Rok Teasley said Notre Dame averaged 23 applicants to the group in each of the past four years. Nineteen seniors applied already this year, and the rolling application process is ongoing. Current seniors wishing to join the 25 Notre Dame alumni currently serving in the Peace Corps must first complete a grueling application process, according to the release. Senior Claire Brosnihan said the process includes a lengthy online application, an hour-long interview with very specific and personal questions, and multiple steps of clearance, contributing to months of waiting. Brosnihan, a political science major with a minor in peace studies, said she would be stationed in French-speaking sub-Saharan Africa to work on a malnutrition-focused public health program. “The Peace Corps gives you a different perspective from South Bend, Indiana and Notre Dame,” Brosnihan said. “Putting all of your beliefs into action is a big part of it.” Brosnihan said she would like to work in international relations or at an international non-profit organization after her time in the Peace Corps. Senior Shannon Coyne will also join the Peace Corps after graduation. A political science and Arabic double major with a minor in peace studies, Coyne said she will be teaching English in either Jordan or Morocco. “I was attracted to the principles that underlie the mission of the [Peace Corps],” Coyne said. “I was interested in post-graduate service, and it seemed like a logical choice.” Coyne said her minor in Peace Studies prepared her for her time in the Peace Corps. “Peace Studies classes are good for helping you think about ways to promote international development,” Coyne said. “But more than my studies, my experiences outside the classroom really prepared me.” Coyne participated in service through the Center for Social Concerns and the Kellogg Institute, and traveled to Ghana and Cairo, Egypt through the University, which provided invaluable service experiences for her. Coyne said she is most interested in gender issues and will seek a master’s degree in development after leaving the Peace Corps in hopes of working for a non-governmental organization. Megan Conway, a 2006 Notre Dame graduate, also studied Peace Studies while she was a student. She joined the Peace Corps after graduation and is now at the University of Michigan Law School. Conway said a class on tropical African politics she took as an undergraduate piqued her interest in Africa. She was stationed in Cameroon, where she worked on public health initiatives. “We worked with potable water projects, AIDS education, basic health and hygiene and environmental education classes,” Conway said. “And I focused in pre-natal care projects.” Although her time in the Peace Corps was rewarding and worthwhile, Conway said she learned that international sustainable development, more specifically public health, was not the field for her. “I had a phenomenal experience, but I realized that I didn’t want to live abroad for the rest of my life,” Conway said. Conway said the unique undergraduate experience at Notre Dame contributed to her choice to join the Peace Corps. “I don’t think I would have joined the Peace Corps if I had attended one of the other universities I was thinking of,” Conway said. Notre Dame’s relationship can be attributed to the University’s mission to serve others, Coyne said. “It’s definitely the emphasis that Notre Dame students put on service,” Coyne said, “and taking what you learn in the classroom to give back to others.”last_img read more

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