League’s Oceania Cup postponed

first_imgThe series, which was to include a much-anticipated rematch between Tonga and New Zealand and other tests involving Samoa, PNG and the Cook Islands was originally scheduled for June.However the Asia Pacific Rugby League Confederation said it was now looking at delivering fixtures in October and November.Deputy Chair Greg Peters said the unprecedented measures had to be taken for the safety and well-being of players, staff and supporters.”With the recent announcement on mass gatherings and the unpredictability of this pandemic, the safety and well-being of our players, staff and supporters remain a priority,” he said.”We are also very conscious of the current demand on some of our players due to the travel restrictions in place which we will be taking into full consideration going forward.”Peters admitted that even if restrictions were lifted before the event date, it would not be feasible to undertake the work required to deliver the June tests.”The best-case scenario is our calendar is postponed, depending on what the NRL season looks like the back end of the year, but of course, we cannot guarantee anything at this stage.””We are in unfamiliar and unknown territory; collectively, we are all feeling the widespread impact of this pandemic but rest assured, we will be exploring every possible option,” Peters said.Chairman Sandis Tsaka said there were still hopes all nations would be able to play at least once this year.”We’re going with a Plan B where we are putting all the Oceania Cup matches towards the end of the year.”Obviously that would require a lot of discussion between the NRL and the Super League around how they would structure their seasons going forward,” he said.”We will need to see whether we are struggling with the State of Origin, the NRL and Super League matches because the Oceania Cup is mostly made up of players competing in those competitions so we’ll be liaising with them to find an appropriate time within the calendar towards the end of the year around November but obviously everyday the situation is evolving.”last_img read more

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Some States Big Premium Hikes May Be Talking Point During Enrollment Season

first_img Floridians who purchase individual health insurance plans under Obamacare will see their premiums rise by an average of 9.5 percent next year, the state Office of Insurance Regulation said Wednesday. That’s about $36 per month or $432 per year. The average rate change varies widely by insurance company. Four insurers offering plans on Florida’s federally run Affordable Care Act insurance exchange will have average increases in the double digits: Aetna (13.9 percent), Humana (16.3 percent), Preferred Medical Plan (14 percent) and UnitedHealthcare (16.4 percent). But some consumers will end up paying less for health insurance than they did in 2015. Celtic Insurance Co., Health Options, Florida Health Care Plan, and Molina Health Care are set to decrease their rates. (McGrory, 8/26) At a July town hall in Nashville, Tenn., President Barack Obama played down fears of a spike in health insurance premiums in his signature health law’s third year. “My expectation is that they’ll come in significantly lower than what’s being requested,” he said, saying Tennesseans had to work to ensure the state’s insurance commissioner “does their job in not just passively reviewing the rates, but really asking, ‘OK, what is it that you are looking for here? Why would you need very high premiums?’” That commissioner, Julie Mix McPeak, answered on Friday by greenlighting the full 36.3% increase sought by the biggest health plan in the state, BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee. (Radnofsky and Armour, 8/26) Some States’ Big Premium Hikes May Be Talking Point During Enrollment Season, Campaigns The Wall Street Journal reports that some insurers are winning approval by state regulators of hefty increases in health insurance premiums. Meanwhile, Florida news outlets report on what the numbers look like in that state. Health insurance premiums for Floridians who buy their own plans will rise 9.5 percent on average for 2016, though some consumers will pay less for their coverage than they did this year, state insurance regulators reported Wednesday. A total of 19 health insurance companies submitted rate filings to Florida’s Office of Insurance Regulation, which this year regained the authority to deny rate increases for health plans sold on the Affordable Care Act’s insurance exchange at HealthCare.gov. Average rate changes for 2016 plans sold on the ACA exchange will range from a decrease of nearly 10 percent for some plans, to an increase of as much as 16 percent for others. (Chang, 8/27) The Wall Street Journal: Insurers Win Big Health-Rate Increases center_img Tampa Bay Times: Premiums For Obamacare To Rise 9.5 Percent Overall In Florida The Miami Herald: Obamacare Health Insurance Premiums To Rise 9.5 Percent For 2016, State Regulator Reports This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription.last_img read more

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