CSEC PE Lecture | Physical activity versus exercise and wellness

first_imgThere has been an abundance of scientific research on physical activity, and exercise, and a clear distinction has been established between the two. Physical activity is bodily movement produced by skeletal muscles. It requires energy expenditure and produces progressive health benefits. Typical examples of physical activity include walking to and from work, taking the stairs instead of elevators, gardening, doing household chores, dancing and washing the car by hand. Physical inactivity, on the other hand, implies a level of inactivity that is lower than that required to maintain good health. Exercise is a type of activity that requires planned, structured, and repetitive bodily movement to improve or maintain one or more components of physical fitness. Examples of exercise are walking, running, cycling, aerobics, swimming and strength training. Poor health because of the lack of physical activity is a serious public-health problem that must be taken seriously. A number of individuals do not achieve the recommended amount of physical activity, and some of us are not physically active at all. Furthermore, the number of people who are not physically active is at risk of suffering from health and lifestyle related issues. Regular moderate physical activity can prevent premature death, unnecessary illnesses and disability. It can provide substantial benefits in health and well-being to the vast majority of people who are not physically active. Individuals who are already moderately active can increase their amount of physical activity to achieve greater health benefit. Among the benefits that can be achieved are significantly reduced risk for developing or dying from heart disease, diabetes, colon cancer and high blood pressure. Regular physical activity is also good for the bones, muscles and joints. It also reduces symptoms of depression and anxiety, improves mood, and enhances one’s ability to perform daily tasks throughout life. It also can help to control health care costs and help to maintain a high quality of life in old age. Moderate exercise is defined as using 150 calories of energy per day or 1,000 calories per week. It is recommended that persons must strive to achieve at least 30 minutes of physical activity per day for most days of the week. A moderate physical activity is a little more strenuous than the examples previously given for physical activity and includes playing court games such as volleyball, basketball, netball, as well as swimming, dancing fast and water aerobics. Wellness People must recognise that participating in fitness programs improve their quality of life. However, improving physical fitness alone is not always sufficient to lower the risk for disease and ensure better health. Even though most people are aware of their unhealthy behaviour, they seem satisfied with life as long as they are free from symptoms of disease or illness. They do not contemplate change until they suffer a major health problem. Present lifestyle habits, however, dictate the health and well-being of tomorrow. The notion of good health has evolved notably and continues to change as persons learn about lifestyle factors that bring on illness and affect wellness. Furthermore, once the idea took hold that fitness by itself will not always decrease the risk for disease and ensure better health, the wellness concept developed. For a wellness way of life, not only must individuals be physically fit and manifest no sign of disease, but they must also be free of risk factors for disease (such as cigarette smoking, negative stress, faulty nutrition, careless sex). Even though an individual may demonstrate adequate or even excellent fitness, indulgence in unhealthy lifestyle behaviour will still increase the risk for chronic diseases and diminish the person’s well-being. Wellness has seven dimensions: physical, emotional, mental, social, environmental, occupational and spiritual. These dimensions are interrelated, one frequently affects the other. The seven dimensions of wellness shows how the |concept clearly goes beyond the absence of disease and incorporates factors such as adequate fitness, proper nutrition, stress management, disease prevention, spirituality, not smoking or abusing drugs, personal safety, regular physical examinations, health education and environmental support. Wellness living requires implementing positive programs to change behaviour to improve health and quality of life, prolong life and achieve total wellbeing.last_img read more

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Time for your ‘Leap Second’ resolutions

first_img “This might never happen again in our lifetime, in our great-great-great grandchildren’s lifetime,” he said. Sitting in his living room among an eyepopping collection of electronics, run by some 10 remote controls lined up on his coffee table, are the three clocks that he has labeled by manufacturer and system of timekeeping. To the untrained eye, they differ by the color of the readouts: teal, amber and red. It took some research in recent weeks for Newhall to determine which of his three antenna-tuned atomic-digital clocks (he also has a standard face clock and two atomic watches – one for each wrist) would accurately reflect the time when the leap second occurred. The lower-tech Spectracom red numeral clock was the only one whose manufacturer said testing had showed the 60 would appear in the seconds slot. The others, by the same manufacturer, will either hold 59 or 00 for an extra second. “I want to scold them for not doing a better job,” he said of Symmetricom clocks. Newhall, a descendant of the Santa Clarita Valley’s pioneering family, was an astronomer for Jet Propulsion Laboratory for 35 years before retiring eight years ago. It’s a safe bet he was never late for work. He spends hours a week in his roomful of computers, noting he gets about 800 hits a second on his Web site (http://sn.to) from users who want to know real time, mainly to set computer clocks. A watch that’s a few minutes off is intolerable to Newhall, who said he’s matured beyond the days when such an inaccuracy would trigger his adrenaline. And while super-accurate time isn’t crucial to the average person, it matters for those who launch satellites or work power grids, Mosley said. “When you’re switching energy grids, you’ve got to be dead-on,” he said. “When you and I go shopping for chicken, it doesn’t matter so much.” Patricia Farrell Aidem, (661) 257-5251 pat.aidem@dailynews.com160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! VALENCIA – A huge quake rupturing Earth’s crust, heavy snow in Siberia or even high winds in the Andes Mountains can alter the planet’s rotation and change time, if only by a single second. And for people like retired astronomer Skip Newhall, a second is a big deal – big enough that he’s planning his first, and possibly last, “leap second” party today at his Valencia home to note the extra blink of the clock between 3:59:59 and 4:00:00 p.m. local time. “We’re going to have 30, 35 people,” Newhall said Friday. “I’ve got three different time readouts. One will have a 60 in the second spot – clocks don’t usually do that – and I have a couple of clocks that aren’t going to read right. “I’m going to have everyone give a chorus of ‘boos’ for those.” AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORERose Parade grand marshal Rita Moreno talks New Year’s Day outfit and ‘West Side Story’ remake Leap seconds have been occurring since 1972 in either January or June – every one to seven or so years as needed to maintain Earth, not man-made clocks, as the ultimate timekeeper, said John Mosley, an astronomer at the Griffith Park Observatory. The leap second is actually aimed at midnight, Greenwich Mean Time. But now there is talk among the world’s weights and measures agencies of abandoning the practice of adding seconds as needed to keep up with Earth’s imprecise rotation, Mosley said. Proponents say it would be a simpler way of keeping time. The astronomy community argues that Earth, not humans, should dictate time, even though it means adding a second every few years. “If you let a mechanical clock be the ultimate source, it’s simpler, but then the Earth is going to get out of sync with the calendar,” Mosley said. “The problem is March starts happening when it’s still winter. It’s sort of like abandoning the gold standard when you abandon the Earth as the time standard.” For Newhall, he’s billing his get-together as possibly the last time anyone alive now will experience a leap second. If the world’s time gurus determine it would be simpler to catch up with Earth by adding a leap hour, it would be about 3,600 years before the seconds added up, he said. last_img read more

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