Is This Salamander Really 40 Million Years Old?

first_imgby Jerry Bergman, PhDThe development of new techniques has allowed researchers to see inside of fossils to evaluate not only organs but also tissues. An example is a report on a new study of “an exceptionally preserved salamander from the Eocene of France”[i] that revealed many of its organs and structures. In addition to the skin and skeleton the researchers found muscles, lung, spinal cord, digestive tract and even nerves.[ii] The most incredible find the French researchers made was the preservation of frog bones within the salamander’s stomach, evidently its last meal. This find is of note because as far as we knew salamanders rarely eat frogs or other salamanders. This is just one of many studies that are creating big problems for evolutionists. A putative 35 to 40-million-year old salamander whose organs look just like a present-day salamander? No evolution in 40 million years? Many organs preserved? The fossil is claimed to be permineralized, where minerals have replaced the organs, leaving good detail of the structural detail that was originally in the organism. It belongs to the same family as the living fire salamander Salamandra salamandra.It is true that in 99 percent of the cases, fossils are represented only by hard parts, such as bones and shells, but that rare 1 percent can tell us a great deal about ancient life, such as it appears that there is no way these fossils could be 40 million years old.The trunk, hip and part of hind legs and tail are also preserved. Although discovered in the 1870s, until very recently the only traits paleontologists could determine about this specimen was the visible anatomical details, such as the cloaca. The cloaca is an external orifice used for reproduction and the urinary canal.The specimen was scanned at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, which produced an incredible level of details achieved by electronically slicing the specimen into a series of thin sections somewhat like CAT scans achieve with x-rays. The technique is called phase-contrast synchrotron X-ray microtomography.[iii] The quality of preservation is such that the details of at least six kinds of organs are preserved in almost perfect condition. As a result, the researchers were able to describe the structures in great detail, indicating little difference exists between this specimen and modern examples. In this case they were not soft tissues, but the organs were permineralized that allow the researchers to describe the structures in great detail, indicating little difference exists between this specimen and modern examples.Soft Tissues Is Another Area of ImportanceThe most exciting development is a technique, namely to dissolve fossil bones in acid to reveal soft tissue, that has revolutionized our understanding of ancient life. Many writers on the topic of ancient soft tissue finds assume, or imply, that Mary Schweitzer’s 2005 article was the first published paper on this topic. This may be because her paper received significantly more attention than all of the previous papers. It was, though, by no means the first paper to determine that soft pliable tissue, including arteries and other blood vessels, exists in dinosaur fossil bones.[iv] Actually, reports date back to 1907 on empirical research of possible blood vessels in dinosaur fossil bones. One review was published in 1920 in The American Naturalist titled “Concerning the Fossilization of Blood Corpuscles” in dinosaur bones. The paper concluded that very good evidence exists for such preserved tissue in dinosaur bones.[v]In his paper “Original Biomaterial in Fossils,” Brian Thomas noted the existence of many pre-2005 publications on soft-tissue, and cited a few examples.[vi] One must wonder why this topic has been almost totally ignored for so long. Today, evolutionists are still trying to explain them away, as documented in the Creation Research Society’s i-Dino project.[vii]  It could be for the reason that Darwinists realize these discoveries produce major problems both for their theory of life’s origin and gradual evolution.ConclusionsThe new techniques, such as phase-contrast synchrotron X-ray microtomography, plus the realization that fossils alleged to be many millions of years old contain soft tissue, will likely result in an enormous number of soft tissue studies on putative ancient fossils. The results will likely cause a revolution in our perceptions about evolution by documenting that these fossils are not as old as once believed, and that little change has occurred from these ancient specimens and to animals living today. Time will tell. Stay tuned.[i] Ancient petrified salamander reveals its last meal https://phys.org/news/2017-10-ancient-petrified-salamander-reveals-meal.html October 3, 2017.[ii] Jérémy Tissier et al, 2017 Exceptional soft tissues preservation in a mummified frog-eating Eocene salamander, Peer Journal 5:e3861 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.3861[iii] Tissier, 2017.[iv] One of the newest is Yao-Chang Lee, Cheng-Cheng Chiang, Pei-Yu Huang, Chao-Yu Chung, Timothy D. Huang, Chun-Chieh Wang, Ching-Iue Chen, Rong-Seng Chang, Cheng-Hao Liao, Robert R. Reisz. Evidence of preserved collagen in an Early Jurassic sauropodomorph dinosaur revealed by synchrotron FTIR microspectroscopy. Nature Communications, 2017; 8: 14220 | DOI: 10.1038/ncomms14220. And Dinosaur rib bones reveal remnants of 195-million-year-old protein. February 1, 2017.https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/02/170201140952.htm.See also1/29/17 http://crev.info/2017/01/no-doubts-left-its-dinosaur-protein/Source article: https://news.ncsu.edu/2017/01/schroeter-collagen/Source paper: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acs.jproteome.6b00873and 1/31/17 http://crev.info/2017/01/oldest-dinosaur-blood-reported/Source article: https://phys.org/news/2017-01-dino-rib-yields-evidence-oldest.htmlSource paper: http://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms14220[v] Sept-October 1920 pp 460-464[vi] See p. 238-239 of The iDINO Project Special Report. Creation Research Society Quarterly. Spring 2015 issue. 51(4)[vii] See “Dinosaur Tissue or Bacterial Biofilms?” By Kevin Anderson, PhD in the iDINO project report cited above.Dr Jerry Bergman, professor, author and speaker, is a frequent contributor to Creation-Evolution Headlines. See his Author Profile for his previous articles. Recommended Resource: Dr. Bergman’s book Fossil Forensics analyzes every animal and plant category, showing that the fossil record does not support Darwinian evolution.(Visited 490 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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World Cup of Disabled Golf tees off in South Africa

first_img21 May 2014The South African Disabled Golf Association will break new ground this week with the hosting of the inaugural World Cup of Disabled Golf, which tees off at Zebula Golf Estate and Spa in Limpopo province on Wednesday.The event is a 54-hole stroke-play championship and has drawn entries from Australia, Canada, England, New Zealand, Sweden and the United States.In-form rising stars Daniel Slabbert and Reinard Schuhknecht will partner with seasoned campaigner Conrad Scholtz in chasing down a home victory.‘A really big deal’Kathu’s Slabbert said there is a lot of pride at stake for the South African team. “The World Cup is a really big deal, but to tee it up for South Africa here at home is huge,” the three-time Nedbank SA Disabled Golf Open champion said in a statement on Tuesday.“We are South Africa’s first disabled golfers to earn national colours, along with our team manager, Eugene Vorster. We all definitely feel the pressure, because to wear the green and gold is an enormous honour for any athlete.“The South African Disabled Golf Association worked incredibly hard to make this event happen and we want to do the country proud by winning the first World Cup.”Schuhknecht believes the South African trio have had enough laps around the 6 829 metre Zebula layout over the last week to prepare for the challenge.“We all played in the Nedbank SA Disabled Golf Open here last week and we’ve had some practice rounds since, so we are definitely ready for the World Cup,” the 2013 World One-Arm Stroke Play champion explained.“However, every team here wants to be the first winners of the World Cup, so the competition will be stiff. We just have to give it our best shot and make sure we come out on top.”Stranglehold brokenJust a week ago, reigning Canadian and American amputee golf champion Josh Williams broke Slabbert’s stronghold on the country’s premier disabled golf tournament and added the South African Disabled Open title to his tally.The Kitchener native is relishing the chance to win the inaugural World Cup for Canada alongside Johannes Grames and Robert MacDermott.“I love team competitions, so I am really looking forward to the challenge this week,” Williams said.“It’s a fine thing to own three national titles, but in a team competition, it’s all down to how you perform on the day.“We had a great practice round, and I’m confident we’ll do well here. The course is in fantastic nick, despite the struggles they have had with drought in this neck of the woods.“It’s a long layout, but it is very fair and if you go off-line here, you will pay the price.”‘Tough competition’The Canada Post employee said he is expecting a tough week. “We have some serious competition here this week,” he said. “Daniel and Reinard finished second and third last week, so they will be looking for a home victory and a little revenge. But we also have guys like Geoff Nicholas from Australia, Kenny Bonz and Tracy Ramin from the USA, who can be dangerous.“As far as I am concerned, everyone has brought their A-game and the World Cup is wide open.”Multiple US Amputee Championship winner Nicholas will partner Graham Kenyon and Shane Luke for Australia, while Bonz from the United States will line up with James Curley and Ramin, who finished sixth at the Nedbank SA Disabled Golf Open.SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

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South Africa moves up the Mo Ibrahim Index

first_imgSouth Africa’s overall ranking has risen from 5 to 4Johannesburg, Wednesday 1 October 2014 – Brand South Africa today welcomed the results of the 2014 Mo Ibrahim Index of African Governance which saw South Africa’s overall position move from 5 to 4.Download press releaseIn addition, South Africa has improved in eight of the sub-indicators in the report including:AccountabilityParticipationGenderBusiness environmentInfrastructureRural sectorWelfare, andHealthThe Mo Ibrahim Index of African Governance is the third index in the last few months that has observed improvements in South Africa’s infrastructure. The indices on which South Africa’s ranking in infrastructure has improved include the recently released World Economic Forum’s Global Competitive Index and the Institute of Management Development.Reflecting on the 2014 Mo Ibrahim Index, Brand South Africa’s CEO Miller Matola said: “South Africa’s improvements in 8 sub-indicators is very encouraging. Our ranking on infrastructure development also bodes well for our economic growth and development since good infrastructure is attractive to investors and makes it easier to conduct business more efficiently and effectively.”“Despite improvements in the areas highlighted above, we note with concern a decrease in our ranking on Safety & Rule – from position 7 to 8 and Participation and Human Rights from position 3 to 4 this year. These issues impact equally on our competitiveness and ability to attract inward flows of investment.”Brand South Africa will host the second annual South African Competitiveness Forum in Sandton, Johannesburg on 4-5 November 2014 where South Africa’s competitiveness and how it can be strengthened will be discussed by a range of stakeholders.The conversation can be followed at @Brand_SA #CompetitiveSA.For more information or to set up interviews, please contact:Boitumelo MpeteTel: +27 11 712 5007Mobile: +27 (0) 82 358 9047Email: boitumelom@brandsouthafrica.comlast_img read more

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Lawsuits Target Glyphosate in Canada

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Todd NeeleyDTN Staff ReporterOMAHA (DTN) — Bayer’s legal battle on glyphosate has headed north of the border as class-action lawsuits alleging the use of Roundup causes cancer, have been launched in Canada.The latest was filed on May 24 in Quebec, where dairy farmer Liliane Paquette is seeking $10 million in damages. The lawsuit said she was diagnosed with stage-four chronic lymphocytic leukemia, a type of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, in 2005. Paquette is the first plaintiff in the new lawsuit that alleges exposure to glyphosate, although she didn’t spray the product.In November 2018, Saskatchewan farmer Garry Gadd filed a class-action suit alleging the use of Roundup led to his non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma in 2014. CBC/ Radio Canada reported fewer than 12 plaintiffs have joined the class action that includes people who have sprayed the product.Bayer, which purchased Monsanto, recently lost three similar lawsuits in the United States.Most recently a California jury awarded $2.055 billion in damages to a couple that has battled cancer after decades of using the product. It’s the largest of three awards juries have handed out since Bayer acquired Monsanto last year.Both Canadian class actions allege the company knew about the potential dangers of glyphosate and didn’t take the proper actions to inform and protect the public.The latest lawsuit said Paquette was exposed to Roundup while living and working on her dairy from 1997 to 2005.“Although the Plaintiff did not apply Roundup to the fields (the plaintiff’s ex-boyfriend applied the Roundup), in her work on the farm, the plaintiff frequently handled Roundup and/or came into physical contact with crops that had been sprayed with Roundup,” the lawsuit said.“The plaintiff was also exposed to Roundup by living on the farm. The fields surrounding the farmhouse were sprayed with Roundup. When the windows of the farmhouse were open, the plaintiff would frequently breathe in Roundup.“In all of the circumstances of this case, the defendants applied callous and reckless disregard for the health and safety of the plaintiff. The defendants regularly risked the lives of those who used and/or were exposed to their Roundup products, including the plaintiff, with full knowledge of the dangers of these products.”HEALTH CANADA APPROVALIn January 2019, Health Canada completed a regulatory review of glyphosate. The agency concluded glyphosate was unlikely to pose a human cancer risk.In a statement to DTN, Bayer Canada said it continues to stand behind its product.“While we have great sympathy for the plaintiffs, glyphosate-based herbicides are not the cause of their illnesses and we will vigorously defend our products,” the company said.“Glyphosate has been extensively studied globally by scientists and regulators, and results from this research confirm it is not carcinogenic. We firmly stand behind the safety of glyphosate-based products and as a company devoted to life sciences, assure Canadians that their health and the environment are our top priority.”Agricultural crops genetically engineered to withstand glyphosate have greatly expanded the use of the chemistry since 1996. Glyphosate also is used in forestry, urban, lawn and garden applications. Bayer also had glyphosate in its portfolio before acquiring Monsanto.That broad use has drawn worldwide attention to the herbicide and its safety.Though glyphosate was developed by Monsanto, it is off patent and sold by many agriculture companies as one of the most widely used herbicides in the world. It came to market in 1974 under Monsanto’s Roundup label for control of perennial and annual weeds in non-crop and industrial areas.ROUNDUP EXPOSUREIn his lawsuit, Gadd said he was exposed to glyphosate while spraying Roundup with a 400-gallon tank and 40-foot boom. “Mist from the sprayer would get on Gadd as he sprayed which would be common for the class,” the lawsuit said.Similar to Paquette’s lawsuit, Gadd’s action alleges the company was negligent by not taking “reasonable care” in formulating, manufacturing and testing Roundup. In addition, Gadd alleges the company didn’t promote safe handling, continue to conduct ongoing tests and didn’t communicate health risks associated with Roundup.In her lawsuit, Paquette alleges the company was not forthcoming about the science related to glyphosate, and alleges Monsanto relied on ghostwritten studies.“In order to convince consumers, farmers, businesses, and government agencies everywhere that Roundup is safe, the defendants have also relied on ghostwritten studies,” the lawsuit said.“Since 2000, the defendants have ghostwritten and/or published multiple studies through companies such as Exponent, Inc. and the Canadian firm Intertek Group PLC, minimizing any safety concerns related to Roundup and its active ingredient, glyphosate. These studies were submitted to and relied upon by the public and government agencies, including the (Health Canada) agency, in assessing the safety of Roundup and glyphosate. Through these ghostwritten studies, the defendants have fraudulently represented that independent experts have concluded that Roundup and glyphosate are safe.“The defendants have known for decades that they are falsely proclaiming the safety of Roundup and glyphosate. Despite the defendants’ ability and means to investigate, study, and test their Roundup products and to provide adequate warnings of the risks associated with them, the defendants have failed to do so.”The Paquette lawsuit attempts to create a class that includes residents of Quebec who were diagnosed with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma after having used and/or been exposed to Roundup starting in 1976.Todd Neeley can be reached at todd.neeley@dtn.comFollow him on Twitter @toddneeleyDTN(SK/CZ/ES)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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South Africa inflict innings defeat on India

first_imgFirst day’s gloom seemed to have rubbed on to India’s fortunes as the visitors fell to a humiliating innings and 25-run defeat against South Africa at the SuperSport Park in Centurion on Sunday. ScoreSachin Tendulkar celebrates his 50th Test ton in Centurion on Sunday. Agency photoThe only bright spot in the Test was Sachin Tendulkar’s 50th Test century.Some even say India had lost the match the very moment captain Mahendra Singh Dhoni lost the toss.And they weren’t completely wrong, for on a damp wicket with conditions assisting the pacers, there was little that the India batsmen could do after opposition captain Graeme Smith forced them in.As expected the famed India battling line-up folded up like a pack of cards with nine wickets falling on the day save skipper Dhoni, who fell the next day to Morne Morkel.Morkel finished with a five-wicket haul while Dale Steyn took three as India wrapped their first innings on a measly 136.The sun came out bright on Friday and the pitch was dry – perfect conditions for forging batting alliances. And that’s precisely what South Africa did – forge partnerships.The most noteworthy was Hashim Amla and all-rounder Jacques Kallis’s 230-run partnership. While Amla scored 140 before getting out to Ishant Sharma the next day, Kallis remained unbeaten scoring his maiden double ton.Later, Kallis forged a partnership with AB de Villiers to put 224 on board. De Villiers punished the Indian attack, that looked toothless in the absence of injured paceman Zaheer, making a quick-fire 129.advertisementIn fact, his century was so hasty that it entered the record books as the fastest ton by a South African in Test cricket. He reached the mark in just 75 balls.The plight eased for the Indians when the host decided to declare the innings on 620/4 – a commanding 484-run lead in their bag.With a good lead in hand, the South African fielders were in a mood to relax and that showed in their sloppy fielding as they gave the Indian openers Virender Sehwag and Gautam Gambhir five lives before leading them back to the pavilion on 63 and 80 respectively.The fourth day’s proceedings only saw the India batsmen walk in and out of the pavilion as the Proteas tightened the noose.Finally, Sachin Tendulkar and skipper Mahendra Singh Dhoni got on with the rescue operation putting on 172 runs for the seventh wicket.Tendulkar went on to complete his much-desired half-century of Test tons with Dhoni aptly supporting him.No sooner did Tendulkar achieve the target that Dhoni fell, giving an impression that he was only in the middle to help Sachin’s cause.A Dale Steyn delivery that climbed on him had Dhoni fend for cover and in the process he gave away an edge to Mark Boucher behind the stumps. He was out for 90.Post his dismissal Paul Harris accounted for Harbhajan Singh’s wicket to fast track India’s loss. The game could have got over in minutes, but bad weather stopped play and soon stumps were called.Minutes into the fifth day Sachin Tendulkar was standing at the crease unbeaten on 111 as the scoreboard read – South Africa win by an innings and 25 runs – a massive and humiliating defeat for the No. 1 Test team in the world.last_img read more

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IPL final: Shah Rukh Khan dedicates KKR victory to his youngest son

first_imgKolkata Knight Riders (KKR) co-owner Shah Rukh Khan is elated after his team won the final of Indian Premiere League-7 (IPL).Shah Rukh, 48, who was accompanied by his daughter Suhana at the Chinnaswamy stadium, Bangalore last night, dedicated his second IPL triumph to his youngest son AbRam.”It still hasn’t sunk in to be Champions again. Thank you my KKR for making us so happy,” Shah Rukh posted on Twitter.Shah Rukh’s colleagues from the film fraternity took to Twitter to congratulate the ‘Chennai Express’ star for the win.”@iamsrk congrats-well deserved victory-big hug,” Riteish Deshmukh tweeted.KKR defeated Kings XI Punjab in a thrilling final by three wickets.’Don’ producer Ritesh Sidhwani posted, “@iamsrk congratulations to team KKR by far the best finals of all IPL seasons. Have to party when we get back.””Congrats to team KKR and @iamsrk !Woohoo!,” actress Bipasha Basu tweeted.The finale also witnessed the first look launch of megastar Amitabh Bachchan’s debut fiction show ‘Yudh’, directed by Anurag Kashyap.last_img read more

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