CSEC PE Lecture | Physical activity versus exercise and wellness

first_imgThere has been an abundance of scientific research on physical activity, and exercise, and a clear distinction has been established between the two. Physical activity is bodily movement produced by skeletal muscles. It requires energy expenditure and produces progressive health benefits. Typical examples of physical activity include walking to and from work, taking the stairs instead of elevators, gardening, doing household chores, dancing and washing the car by hand. Physical inactivity, on the other hand, implies a level of inactivity that is lower than that required to maintain good health. Exercise is a type of activity that requires planned, structured, and repetitive bodily movement to improve or maintain one or more components of physical fitness. Examples of exercise are walking, running, cycling, aerobics, swimming and strength training. Poor health because of the lack of physical activity is a serious public-health problem that must be taken seriously. A number of individuals do not achieve the recommended amount of physical activity, and some of us are not physically active at all. Furthermore, the number of people who are not physically active is at risk of suffering from health and lifestyle related issues. Regular moderate physical activity can prevent premature death, unnecessary illnesses and disability. It can provide substantial benefits in health and well-being to the vast majority of people who are not physically active. Individuals who are already moderately active can increase their amount of physical activity to achieve greater health benefit. Among the benefits that can be achieved are significantly reduced risk for developing or dying from heart disease, diabetes, colon cancer and high blood pressure. Regular physical activity is also good for the bones, muscles and joints. It also reduces symptoms of depression and anxiety, improves mood, and enhances one’s ability to perform daily tasks throughout life. It also can help to control health care costs and help to maintain a high quality of life in old age. Moderate exercise is defined as using 150 calories of energy per day or 1,000 calories per week. It is recommended that persons must strive to achieve at least 30 minutes of physical activity per day for most days of the week. A moderate physical activity is a little more strenuous than the examples previously given for physical activity and includes playing court games such as volleyball, basketball, netball, as well as swimming, dancing fast and water aerobics. Wellness People must recognise that participating in fitness programs improve their quality of life. However, improving physical fitness alone is not always sufficient to lower the risk for disease and ensure better health. Even though most people are aware of their unhealthy behaviour, they seem satisfied with life as long as they are free from symptoms of disease or illness. They do not contemplate change until they suffer a major health problem. Present lifestyle habits, however, dictate the health and well-being of tomorrow. The notion of good health has evolved notably and continues to change as persons learn about lifestyle factors that bring on illness and affect wellness. Furthermore, once the idea took hold that fitness by itself will not always decrease the risk for disease and ensure better health, the wellness concept developed. For a wellness way of life, not only must individuals be physically fit and manifest no sign of disease, but they must also be free of risk factors for disease (such as cigarette smoking, negative stress, faulty nutrition, careless sex). Even though an individual may demonstrate adequate or even excellent fitness, indulgence in unhealthy lifestyle behaviour will still increase the risk for chronic diseases and diminish the person’s well-being. Wellness has seven dimensions: physical, emotional, mental, social, environmental, occupational and spiritual. These dimensions are interrelated, one frequently affects the other. The seven dimensions of wellness shows how the |concept clearly goes beyond the absence of disease and incorporates factors such as adequate fitness, proper nutrition, stress management, disease prevention, spirituality, not smoking or abusing drugs, personal safety, regular physical examinations, health education and environmental support. Wellness living requires implementing positive programs to change behaviour to improve health and quality of life, prolong life and achieve total wellbeing.last_img read more

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Lakers notes: Old vets get new life off bench

first_imgEL SEGUNDO – Aaron McKie and Shammond Williams are back in service. The Lakers dusted them off, inflated their tires and put them back on the road, they way they would an old bike in the garage. Surprisingly enough, they still run pretty well. McKie and Williams, two veteran guards buried at the end of the Lakers’ bench for much of the season, have provided valuable minutes in recent games. “We had to make some changes, and we didn’t have many (options),” Jackson said. “We had to go with some veterans who know how to play. You know if things come their way, they’re going to shoot.” McKie and Williams have been efficient, if not dynamic. McKie had not taken a shot this season before Friday but is 3 for 3 from the field and has totaled six rebounds and four assists in 40 minutes. Williams is 6 for 11 from the field, for 13 points in 51 minutes, and has three steals and four assists. “They’re both getting into game shape and starting to feel the things that come naturally to them,” Jackson said. “They’re going to fill gaps we need and then we will see about getting the young guys back in there. There are 13 or 14 guys on the roster who can contribute for us and we feel good about that.” Injury update: Maurice Evans, whose knee swelled after a collision with Utah’s Matt Harpring on Monday, had fluid drained from the knee Wednesday morning and did not practice. Evans, who also did not practice Tuesday, is considered day to day, according to a team spokesman. Also uncertain for Friday is the status of Luke Walton, who might return from a sprained ankle. Walton practiced for a second consecutive day and went through a more vigorous 5-on-5 workout. Afterward, he reported feeling well and repeated his hope that he will be able to return Friday against Sacramento. “It’s too early to decide, but that’s what I’m hoping for,” Walton said. “My legs and lungs feel a lot better. Now I have to get my strength back and my explosion back.” Kwame Brown, also out with a sprained ankle, is not expected to return until next week. Walton wants to play, but even if he feels he can, the decision will be Jackson’s to make. “I don’t know if I’d play him at the level he’s at right now,” Jackson said. “Right now he doesn’t have the power and strength he would like to have, but that can change over the next couple days.” Kobe Bryant, who has had throat and elbow issues this week, went through only a light workout. rich.hammond@dailynews.com (818) 713-3611 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!center_img In the past three games, Williams has averaged 17 minutes and McKie has averaged 11.7minutes. With young guards Jordan Farmar and Sasha Vujacic dealing with consistency issues, coach Phil Jackson indicated that he’s likely to give Williams, 31, and McKie, 34, sustained playing time into March. The idea, born out of a six-game losing streak, seems to have given new life to the Lakers’ backcourt. last_img read more

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