Wolf Administration Provides Guidance to Resume High School and Other Summer Sports

first_img Press Release,  Public Health The Wolf Administration today issued preliminary guidance for high school and recreational sports teams to resume voluntary workouts and other in-person activities in the state’s yellow and green phases. The guidance includes college and professional sports.“Pennsylvania has some of the best athletes and teams in the country and they can now begin to safely return to organized sports,” said Gov. Wolf. This guidance balances keeping student athletes safe from COVID-19 while allowing them to participate in an important part of their lives.“This is another step toward reopening our state and getting things back on track. As students and teammates get ready to train and compete, it’s important that they follow precautions to protect each other and their community from the risk of COVID-19.”The preliminary guidance is a starting point for summer sports teams and the Wolf Administration will continue to work with stakeholders. The guidance for fall, winter and spring sports seasons may be updated.Public and private K-12 schools under the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association (PIAA) and the Pennsylvania Independent Schools Athletic Association (PISAA) in the yellow and green phase can resume voluntary sports-related workouts. Schools must first develop an athletic health and safety plan in alignment with the Department of Education’s Preliminary Guidance for Phased Reopening of Schools guidance, that is approved by the local board of directors and posted on the school’s website.Recreational and amateur sports teams in the green phase that are not affiliated with a K-12 school can hold in-person activities, including games and practices. Examples include basketball, hockey, field hockey, football, soccer, swimming, baseball, softball, lacrosse, gymnastics and kickball. Youth sports organizations should follow CDC guidelines.Gatherings of all participants, including players, athletic staff, officials and spectators are limited to 25 in the yellow phase and 250, or 50 percent capacity, in the green phase, as outlined in the Process to Reopen Pennsylvania.League and team staff must review CDC guidance for youth sports. Coaches and other adult personnel should wear face coverings and screen athletes for symptoms before practices and games. All participants must follow safe hygiene and social distancing practices, avoid unnecessary physical contact, and clean and disinfect equipment and facilities. Teams are encouraged to stagger drop-off and pick-up times at outdoor locations and designate entrances and exits to facilities.Parents and other spectators should practice social distancing, wear face coverings and not enter the field or bench areas. Parents should monitor children for COVID-19 symptoms and evaluate children at higher risk for severe illnesses.College sports sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), including intramural and club sports, can resume in-person activity after developing an athletic health and safety plan in alignment with PDE’s Postsecondary Education Institutions and Adult Education Programs guidance.Professional sports can resume immediately. Teams or leagues in the yellow phase, or if more than 250 people are on site in the green phase, must have a COVID-19 safety plan approved by the Department of Health.The guidance released today provides additional information.The Wolf Administration also updated guidance on outdoor recreation today and previously released summer guidance for camps, pools, and child care.All counties are in the yellow or green phase.Ver esta página en español. SHARE Email Facebook Twitter June 10, 2020center_img Wolf Administration Provides Guidance to Resume High School and Other Summer Sportslast_img read more

Read More →

Your browser does not support the audio element

first_img Your browser does not support the audio element. Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires LISTEN: Andre Ellington, Cardinals Running Back The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelo “If I were a betting man, that will be one of ’em that’s sent in,” Keim told Doug & Wolf on 98.7 F.M., Arizona’s Sports Station.That particular call did not prevent Ellington from having the most productive day of any Cardinals skill position player. Ellington caught nine passes, the most of any Cardinal targeted by Palmer, for 86 yards.In addition, since Week 2, Ellington leads running backs in pass routes with 101, targets with 26 and is fifth with 157 receiving yards, according to Pro Football Focus.At this point in his career, Ellington said he prefers to show off his skillset in open space and his skills have been on display — both on east-rest runs or as a pass catcher on slant or crossing routes.Ellington said as the game wore on, as a result of the 49ers’ commitment to shut down Larry Fitzgerald, he became more of a factor in the pass game — but that was not necessarily the game plan.“That is really how the game went,” Ellington said. “Everyone has an opportunity of getting the ball at any time based off how the defense is playing. I was able to find those zone lanes for Carson and he was able to get me the ball.”A foot injury may have derailed Ellington’s 2014 season, but his performance Sunday reminded him of his rookie season in 2013. Even Mike Pereira, the former Vice President of Officiating for the National Football League and current rules analyst for Fox Sports, thought Ellington had control of the ball.“The ball can move a little bit but he had control first,” Pereira said after the touchdown was overturned. “Clear and obvious to overturn? No way do I see that.”Wow Andre Ellington touchdown overturned #NFL #AZCardinals #BirdGang #SFvsAZ #BeRedSeeRed pic.twitter.com/Ge5s0n9Dnf— 🚨 Ronnie Laybold 🐾 (@YotesHereToStay) October 1, 2017But the initial call of a touchdown was overturned. The Cardinals won the game in overtime, but Ellington said he is not sure what the rules are anymore.“I don’t know what a catch is nowadays,” Ellington told Doug & Wolf on 98.7 FM, Arizona’s Sports Station. “It was the best throw. Carson put it on me where I could catch it. I thought I pulled it in and secured it. I thought I had pretty good control of it. If I can remember correctly, after I caught it and stood up, (I) threw the ball to the referee.”Cardinals general manager Steve Keim said he sends plays the team disagrees with to the league office and seemed to indicate the Ellington touchdown that wasn’t would be one of them. In 15 games (one start), Ellington averaged 5.5 yards per carry on 118 attempts and 9.5 yards per reception on 39 catches.“I’ll say during the game I felt like was in 2013,” Ellington said. “But after the game, I felt like I was in 2013.” 7 Comments   Share   Top Stories Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impact Arizona Cardinals running back Andre Ellington (38) can’t make the touchdown catch as San Francisco 49ers cornerback Rashard Robinson (33) defends during the first half of an NFL football game, Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017, in Glendale, Ariz. (AP Photo/Rick Scuteri) Arizona Cardinals running back Andre Ellington appeared to have a touchdown grab in the second quarter of the Cardinals 18-15 overtime win against the San Francisco 49ers on Sunday. With the Cardinals facing a third down and goal, Palmer looked right, stepped up into the pocket and threw a strike right into Ellington’s hands.The call on the field was a touchdown and replays appeared to show Ellington got both feet in bounds.last_img read more

Read More →