New evidence of cytokine storm in avian flu cases

first_imgJun 14, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – Scientists in Hong Kong have reported new experimental evidence that avian influenza infections in human cells are more likely to trigger a destructive immune-system overreaction, or “cytokine storm,” than human flu viruses are.Writing in the July 1 Journal of Infectious Diseases, the researchers report that two avian flu viruses, a 1997 strain of H5N1 and a 1997 H9N2 strain, caused immune system cells in lab cultures to produce much greater levels of certain chemokines (a class of cytokine, or messenger protein) than such cells did when infected with an ordinary human flu virus.”In general, the chemokines and chemokine-receptor responses of MDMs [monocyte-derived macrophages, a type of immune cell] to avian influenza viruses were much stronger than those to human virus, which may account for the high pathogenicity of avian viruses,” the report states.In addition, the H5N1 strain caused immune cells from adults to produce higher levels of certain cytokines than similar cells from newborn babies did. The authors say that finding may help explain why Hong Kong’s human H5N1 outbreak in 1997 killed 5 of 9 infected adults (older than 12) but only 1 of 9 infected children. That sharp difference in adult and child mortality rates has not been seen in the current wave of H5N1 cases dating to late 2003.Scientists have suggested that the cytokine storm played a role in the high death rate in the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic and is playing a similar role in human cases of H5N1 infection today. Autopsies of H5N1 avian flu victims in Vietnam and elsewhere have revealed lungs choked with debris from excessive inflammation triggered by the virus. Similar severe lung damage was frequently reported in victims of the 1918 pandemic, which disproportionately killed people with the strongest immune systems—young, healthy adults.The new study was conducted by a University of Hong Kong team that has previously reported experimental evidence of a cytokine storm in H5N1 avian flu. The team includes J. S. Malik Peiris and, as first author, Jianfang Zhou.In view of the severe lung damage caused by H5N1 in humans, the team decided to measure the expression of four chemokines and two chemokine receptors induced in MDM cells by avian and human flu viruses. They also sought to compare the chemokine production induced by these viruses in adult-derived MDMs and in neonatal MDMs derived from umbilical cord blood.Three viruses were used: a strain from the 1997 human outbreak in Hong Kong, a 1997 strain of H9N2 from quail, and a 1998 strain of H1N1 human flu from Hong Kong. The H9N2 virus is a precursor of the H5N1 virus, with which it shares six internal proteins, the report says. Because of the safety risks involved in working with H5N1 viruses, the team first did the experiment with the H9N2 virus and then repeated it with the H5N1 virus in a biosafety level 3 facility.The investigators found that all three viruses replicated at similar rates in both adult and neonatal MDMs, as indicated by similar numbers of viral matrix gene copies in the cells. That suggested that differences in chemokine production are not due to greater growth of the avian viruses.The MDMs generally showed much greater chemokine responses to the avian flu viruses than to the human flu virus, and the differences were often greater for the adult MDMs than the neonatal MDMs, the report says.For example, the adult MDM responses to the H5N1 strain were roughly 20-fold greater than their responses to the H1N1 virus. For one particular chemokine, called CCL3, the increase for adult MDMs was about 25-fold, but for neonatal MDMs, it was significantly lower—less than 10-fold, as shown on a graph in the report. For the other three measured chemokines, the responses of adult MDMs to H5N1 also exceeded those of the neonatal MDMs, but the differences were smaller.Also, compared with the H1N1 virus, the H5N1 virus caused adult MDMs to express 6- to7-fold greater levels of the two chemokine receptors (CCR1 and CCR5). But the H5N1 strain induced no significant increase in expression of chemokine receptors by the neonatal MDMs.”We have demonstrated that human MDMs have differential responses to human influenza virus H1N1/98 and avian viruses H9N2/G1 and H5N1/97, in spite of their similar infectivity and viral replication,” the authors write. “Moreover, stronger chemokine and chemokine-receptor responses to avian influenza viruses were detected in adult MDMs than in neonatal MDMs.”They add that the higher CCL3 response to H5N1 by adult MDMs, as compared with neonatal MDMs, may be “one of the important factors” in the higher adult mortality rate in Hong Kong’s 1997 outbreak. They note that higher levels of CCL3, along with several other chemokines, have been found in plasma from people who died of H5N1 disease than in people who survived it.Overall, the authors conclude, “These data suggest that host factors may influence the disease process or outcome.”The latest findings parallel evidence that Peiris and colleagues reported last November concerning the cytokine storm hypothesis. In that study, lung cells growing in a lab culture reacted much more intensely to two strains of H5N1 virus than to an ordinary human flu virus (see link below).Zhou J, Law HKW, Cheung CY, et al. Differential expression of chemokines and their receptors in adult and neonatal macrophages infected with human or avian influenza viruses. J Infect Dis 2006 Jul 1;194:61-70 [Abstract]See also:Nov 16, 2005, CIDRAP News story “Lab study supports idea of ‘cytokine storm’ in H5N1 flu”last_img read more

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FLU NEWS FROM ICAAC: H1N1 studies, IV peramivir findings, Tamiflu for H5N1

first_imgSep 14, 2009 (CIDRAP News) – A wide range of research findings on pandemic H1N1 influenza, seasonal flu, and avian flu was presented over the weekend at the 49th annual Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC) in San Francisco (www.icaac.org).Triple antiviral therapy better than single drugsA triple combination therapy comprising three flu antiviral drugs—amantadine, oseltamivir (Tamiflu), and ribavirin—controls replication of flu viruses better than any of those drugs used independently, according to a multi-national team. Researchers from Adamas Pharmaceuticals in California, Utah State University, the Naval Health Research Center of San Diego, the University of Alabama, and Amsterdam Medical Center in the Netherlands tested the drugs alone and in combination in vitro against H1N1 flu viruses and also against seasonal flu strains that were resistant to amantadine and oseltamivir. (Nguyen JT, et al: “In vitro activity of triple combination therapy against drug-resistant influenza viruses.”)Rapid flu tests miss H1N1 casesRapid tests may not detect novel H1N1 flu as well as slower, more expensive molecular tests do, raising the possibility of under-counting and missed diagnoses, according to researchers from the University of South Florida College of Medicine and Tampa General Hospital. The team took tested samples from suspected flu patients using a rapid test and a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test, and compared both results with a second test by the Florida Department of Health. Sixty-six patients tested positive for influenza A at the Department of Health, but the in-hospital PCR detected only 48 of them and the rapid test only 18. The rapid test also returned 18 false-positives. (Montero JA, et al: “Discordance between a rapid antigen test and PCR for detection of influenza in the current setting of an evolving pandemic of novel H1N1.”)Link between immunoglobulin levels and H1N1 severity seenThe results of a study from three institutions in Melbourne, Australia, suggest that administering immunoglobulin to patients with severe H1N1 infection may mitigate the impact of the disease, particularly in pregnant women who appear to be more vulnerable. The group assessed levels of total serum immunoglobulin as well as particular immunoglobulin subclasses in patients with moderate H1N1 infection and in those with severe cases requiring intensive care, some of whom were pregnant, as well as in uninfected pregnant women. They found that pregnant women infected with H1N1 were more likely to have lower levels of immunoglobulin, and that levels were lower in severe cases than in mild ones. (Gordon CL: “Association between severe swine-origin influenza A virus [S-OIV] infection and immunoglobulin G2 subclass deficiency.”)MRSA as fatal complication in H1N1 casesBacterial co-infections should be considered a dangerous complication of H1N1 infection, researchers from the Women’s and Children’s Hospital of Buffalo, N.Y., and two other institutions warned. The group described severe infections in a 9-year-old girl and a 15-year-old boy who arrived at the emergency room several days after being seen for mild flu symptoms. Both children died of necrotizing pneumonia caused by infection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) as a secondary complication of H1N1 flu. (Johnson KK, et al: “Two fatal pediatric cases of pandemic H1N1/09 influenza complicated by community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus [CA-MRSA]”)IV peramivir compares well with Tamiflu for seasonal fluA single intravenous (IV) dose of the experimental antiviral drug peramivir worked as well as a course of oral oseltamivir (Tamiflu) in a study in Asia, according to an Associated Press (AP) report from the ICAAC meeting. Flu patients were given either a single IV dose of peramivir (300 or 600 mg) or 5 days of oseltamivir, the AP reported. Symptoms cleared in 78 or 81 hours with the lower and higher doses of peramivir, respectively, and in 82 hours with oseltamivir, the story said. Dr. Shigeru Kohno of Nagasaki University, the lead researcher, said side effects were less common with peramivir. But flu expert Dr. Fred Hayden noted that many patients last winter had oseltamivir-resistant strains of flu.Oseltamivir improves survival in H5N1 and seasonal fluRoche, maker of Tamiflu, reported two retrospective studies indicating that the drug significantly improved survival rates in H5N1 avian flu and seasonal flu patients. In the analysis of avian flu cases, 11 of 89 patients (12%) who did not receive the drug survived, versus 45 of 85 (53%) of those who received at least one dose up to 8 days after falling ill. The study is described as the first to systematically assess human H5N1 cases in multiple countries. The other study was an analysis of 760 patients in Hong Kong who had severe seasonal flu, half of whom received oseltamivir. The mortality rates were 6.0% in the untreated group compared with 3.8% in the treated group, a 37% reduction, according to Roche.[Sep 13 Roche press release]H1N1 described as all-ages infectionCompared with seasonal flu, H1N1 flu causes more infections in teenagers and adults and is also responsible for more intensive care unit (ICU) admissions, according to an analysis by the Toronto Invasive Bacterial Diseases Network. A comparison of the clinical features and outcomes of 154 seasonal flu infections in the 2007-08 flu season, along with the first 158 H1N1 infections in the Toronto region, showed that H1N1 infections were more evenly distributed across age-groups and were more likely to occur in children and adults with underlying conditions. (Rebbapragada A, et al: “A comparison of clinical features and outcomes of hospitalization due to seasonal and pandemic influenza A [H1N1].”)Severe H1N1 cases in childrenAlthough H1N1 infection is often mild, 16% of 80 children admitted to a Montreal children’s hospital in May and June required ICU care, 13% were experiencing seizures or other neurologic symptoms at admission, and 35% had abnormally low oxygen levels on arrival. One child died. Two-thirds of the children had underlying conditions—asthma, sickle-cell disease, encephalopathy, and others— that may have predisposed them to illness, said researchers at the Ste. Justine Hospital Research Centre. (Laumay E, et al: “Novel influenza A [H1N1] related hospitalization in a pediatric tertiary care centre: who’s at risk for severe disease?”)News editor Robert Roos contributed to this report.last_img read more

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Starved sports fans to get feast of competitive eating

first_imgOver a gallon of baked beans must be rapidly consumed for a place in the finals, where the first to finish 10 individual cups of ramen noodles will be crowned the champion.The competition will feature $11,500 in prize money, with $5,000 going to the winner.MLE and BetOnline.ag will also donate $10,000 to Feeding America, a hunger relief organization.  “Competitive eating is most powerful when conducted on-stage in front of a large audience, but it is also one of the few sports that professionals can perform from the confines of their own home,” MLE Chairman George Shea said in a statement.”While there has been substantial discussion about which professional sport would be the first to return – with baseball, basketball, golf and MMA all floating recent potential return plans – competitive eating is first to come back,” he said.”It is a powerful statement of American resilience.”The qualifying round will consist of 907 grams of sliced bologna while the quarterfinals will feature one family pack of Oreo cookies and a half gallon (1.9 liters) of milk. Topics :center_img While many Americans self-isolating during the coronavirus crisis have found comfort in frequent trips to the refrigerator, the pros are ready to make those who have overindulged feel better about themselves when they compete in a tournament starting Friday.Major League Eating on Tuesday said it would return to action with the BetOnline Quarantine Challenge, a bracket-style elimination tournament with eight of the world’s top competitive eaters facing off via video from their homes.The competition, which will feature male and female world number ones Joey Chestnut and Miki Sudo, will be carried on MLE’s YouTube channel.last_img read more

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The Scope of Dredging in Russia Expected to Grow

first_imgThe scope of dredging and hydraulic engineering works in Russia is expected to grow this year, informs the maritime industry media group PortNews.A series of 20 dredgers is to be built for operations on inland waterways with Damen sharing its innovative technologies with the industry.Those and other topics were in the spotlight of the 3rd International Congress “Hydraulic Engineering Structures and Dredging”.When speaking at the Congress, Andrey Lavrishchev, General Director of FSUE Rosmorport, said that the scope of dredging planned by FSUE Rosmorport for 2020 is to total 18.4 million cbm.According to him, 8.6 million cbm of material is to be dredged under maintenance projects with 9.83 million cbm to be dredged under new projects.The scope of dredging to be performed by Rosmorport’s own facilities is estimated at 7 million cbm, which is similar to the volumes of the previous year.To read the full story, please click here.last_img read more

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Robredo accepts anti-drug czar job

first_img “Mula simula ang gusto ko ay maging maayos ang kampanya kontra droga,” Robredo said. “Kung ito ang pagkakataon para matigil ang patayan ng mga inosente at mapanagot ang kailangang managot, papasanin ko ito.” “Simula pa lang, handa na tayong tumulong sa ikakabuti ng bayan. Pero kalianman, hindi natin isusuko ang ating paniniwala,” Robredo said. “Kung ang iniisip nila na sa pagpayag ko ay tatahimik ako, nagkakamali sila.” The appointmentcame days after the Duterte offered Robredo to be his drug czar and give her“full powers” to run the government’s war on drugs for six months. MANILA – VicePresident Leni Robredo has finally accepted President Rodrigo Duterte’s offer ofa lead role in his war on drugs. “Kung ito ang pagkakataon para matigil ang patayan ng mga inosente at mapanagot ang kailangan managot, papasanin ko ito kaya tinatanggap ko ang trabahong ibinibigay sa akin ng Pangulo,” Robredo told reporters on Wednesday.  This, despitecalls by allies, Sen. Leila De Lima and former senator Antonio Trillanes, onRobredo not to take the challenge. President Duterte made true to his declaration of appointing Robredo as part of the administration’s antidrug committee following the latter’s comment that the war on drugs is obviously failing. She hopes changes in the administration’s approach in curbing the illegal drug trade in the country.center_img “Maraming nagpapahayag ng pangamba na hindi sinsero ang alok, na ito ay isang trap na ang habol lang ay siraan at pahiyain ako,” Robredo said. “Hindi laro laro ang usapang ito. Seryosong usapan ito ‘pag buhay ang nakataya,” she added. “Mr. President, dalawa’t kalahating taon na lang ang naiiwan sa administrasyon. Hindi pa huli ang lahat, puwede pa nating pagtulungan ito.” Created through Executive Order 15 issued in March 2017, the ICAD was mandated to ensure the effective conduct of anti-illegal drug operations and arrest of high-value drug personalities down to the street-level peddles and users and cleanse the bureaucracy of unscrupulous personnel involved in illegal drug activities, among other functions. Robredo said that she is ready to serve as the co-chairman of the Inter-Agency Committee on Anti-Illegal Drugs (ICAD), alongside the Philippine Drug Enforcement Agency chief Aaron Aquino. “Kung ito ang pagkakataon para matigil ang patayan ng mga inosente at mapanagot ang kailangan managot, papasanin ko ito,” says Vice President Leni Robredo. Robredo finally accepted President Rodrigo Duterte’s offer of a lead role in his war on drugs on Wednesday. ABS-CBN NEWS Last month, Robredo called on Duterte to allow the United Nations to investigate his war on drugs which she said was “obviously, not working,” prompting Malacañang’s challenge for her to lead the “drug war.” She later clarified that she meant to urge administration leaders to “step back and assess” the narcotics crackdown./PNlast_img read more

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Foreigners from virus-hit areas banned from gatherings

first_imgILOILO City – Foreigners from countries with confirmed cases ofthe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are prohibited from attending massgatherings here. * Organizers of mass gatherings must have medical and securityplans approved by the Philippine National Police and the City Disaster Risk Reductionand Management Office. Here are the other health safety guidelines from the city governmentvis-à-vis mass gatherings: In ordering the ban, Mayor Jerry Treñas said city government istaking proactive steps to keep Iloilo free from COVID-19, which haspneumonia-like symptoms. WHO has upgraded the global risk of the coronavirus outbreak to“very high” Friday last week, its top level of risk assessment. But the UnitedNations body said there was still a chance of containing the virus if its chainof transmission were broken. * There should be medical teams and ambulances on standby duringmass gatherings. * Organizers of mass gatherings should make available handsanitizers and alcohol to the attendees. * After contact with respiratory secretions, one should performhand hygiene. Two big events the city government recently cancelled were theParaw Regatta (Feb. 23 to March 1) and the religious gathering RUN for Jesus2020 (Feb. 27) with participants from South Korea, the country outside Chinawith the highest cases of COVID-19. Globally, more than 80,000 people have been infected. About 2,800have died – the vast majority in China’s Hubei province, the epicenter of theoutbreak. * Persons with signs and symptoms of respiratory infection such ascough and cold should wear medical masks. The disease seems to start with a fever, followed by a dry cough.The incubation period – between infection and showing any symptoms – lasts upto 14 days, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). But someresearchers say it may be as long as 24 days. And Chinese scientists say somepeople may be infectious even before their symptoms appear. * The elderly, young, pregnant women and those with existingmedical conditions should wear facemasks at all times. People with a history of travel to other countries with confirmedcases of COVID-19 and has not completed 14 days of quarantine are also notallowed to attend mass gatherings, he stressed. Just this Feb. 25 the city mayor issued an executive ordersuspending all major public gatherings up to the end of March. WHO head Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus also stressed that fearand misinformation were the biggest challenges to overcome. * Practice proper respiratory hygiene when at mass gatherings.This includes covering the nose and mouth with disposable tissue or elbow whencoughing or sneezing. Dispose used tissue properly. After a week, it leads to shortness of breath and some patientsrequire hospital treatment. More than 50 countries have now reported cases of coronavirus./PNlast_img read more

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Plans move forward for Annenberg building

first_imgA timeline has been set, an architect has been selected and a tentative site has been chosen for the new Annenberg School for Communication & Journalism building.The Annenberg Foundation donated $50 million in October to create a new state-of-the-art building on the USC campus.Change · Students study in the Annenberg School for Communication & Journalism’s east lobby. The building will still be used for classes. – Jennifer Schultz | Daily Trojan “The planning process has been underway for several months and includes a strategic assessment of the school’s current space, future space needs, existing buildings, what might move to a new building and what might stay in an existing building,” said Joe Back, associate senior vice president for Campus Development and Facilities Management.This week, DEGW, a strategic business consultancy firm that is working with the Annenberg School to plan the building, held a series of workshops with students, faculty and administrators to get feedback on the beginning design stages of the building.Feedback from students and faculty at yesterday’s Media Production workshop, which focused on what media production will look like in the new building, included a wish for more collaborative media space and improved spaces for Annenberg student media organizations like Neon Tommy and Annenberg TV News.“A key focus is that we want the new building to be able to focus on student-produced programs and showcase these programs in the new building,” said James Vasquez, assistant dean of operations at Annenberg.Technology and equipment updates were another common issue discussed in yesterday’s workshop.“The broadcast industry is moving so quickly that it’s hard to keep up,” said Sean Patrick Lewis, a sophomore majoring in broadcast and digital journalism. “I’m hopeful that with the new building we’ll not only caught up, but be ahead of the game.”The workshops have also discussed ways to improve the current Annenberg building, which will remain a part of the Annenberg School. Vazques said, however, that he is not certain how the current Annenberg building will be utilized when the new building is complete.The site has been tentatively set as the southeast corner of Watt and Childs Ways, next to the Pertusati Bookstore. The Campus Planning Committee of the Board of Trustees must first approve the site after a presentation in April.Annenberg hired Harley Ellis Devereaux, an architecture firm, to construct the building. Vasquez said firm will be given the feedback from the workshops to help create designs for the new building. Space planning should be completed by September or October of this year, according to Vasquez.The groundbreaking for the new building is set for June 2012, and construction is expected to take 18 months. The launch of the building is expected to occur in Fall 2014.In addition to opening more space to bring back various Annenberg centers that have been moved off-campus, such as the Center for Health Reporting, an organization that partners journalists with news organizations to learn about health care in California, the new building will give the current Annenberg building a new sense of purpose, according to Vasquez.“We expect to be able to bring some of these centers back,” Vasquez said, “and continue to be a fully functioning building that will complement a new location.”Since Annenberg expanded to encompass undergraduate journalism and communication as well as the existing graduate school programs 16 years ago, the building originally built for 100 people has come to serve more than 2,200 students and 83 full-time faculty members, according to Vasquez.“For the first time in history, we can build a building that truly showcases what work we do,” Vasquez said. “Here we don’t have the ability to walk into a single location and see what’s happening, and [the new building] will provide an opportunity to share resources, share ideas and be more collaborative.”last_img read more

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Stanford professor speaks on media and election politics

first_imgStedman said the U.S. climate of polarization and distrust was considered abnormal to those of other democracies. He said the upcoming election will be heavily impacted by dishonest advertisements, including hacking of candidates’ private social media accounts, campaigns and parties and paid advertisements that spread disinformation. Former 2020 presidential candidate Mike Bloomberg, who dropped out Wednesday, spent more money on advertisements than all the other candidates combined in hopes of gaining more votes, according to the Washington Post.  Stedman said the Annan Commission did not investigate whether social media should be regulated or removed, but focused instead on evaluating electoral integrity on these platforms.  Daniel Mills, a sophomore majoring in political science and economics, asked Stedman whether the population can be educated and persuaded to reject biased, misleading political ads or misinformation on platforms. Stedman said that because the United States is polarized and the tactics have already been used by the Republican Party, there is no way to force the population to disregard certain ads online. Secretary General of the Kofi Annan Commission on Elections and Democracy in the Digital Age Stephen Stedman discussed the hindrances of the internet age on the democratic election process and provided recommendations for steps the government can take to lessen the disruption of fair democratic election through media to more than 50 people at Ronald Tutor Campus Center Wednesday.  “I think [2020]’s going to get really bad,” Stedman said. “I think political advertising in this country until November is going to be a sewer … There’s a whole bunch of unethical practices out there concerning the digital space and political advertising.”  Facebook does not have strict guidelines for candidates and parties, Stedman said, which allows candidates and campaigns to promote anything on the website. Stedman also said the power of microtargeting is growing, meaning audiences with similar beliefs are only receiving information that affirms their own perspectives. Muyang Zhang, a graduate student studying aging services management, attended the event in hopes of learning more about U.S. politics as the 2020 election is approaching. The discussion helped Zhang identify the positive and negative effects of the digital world.  The conversation, which was moderated by Center for the Political Future director Bob Shrum and Global Policy Institute director Steve Lamy, elaborated on the findings from the Report of the Kofi Annan Commission on Elections and Democracy in the Digital Age released in January, which detailed the impacts of social media in elections. The Annan Commission aims to protect the legitimacy of democracy. Its recent report shared data about new democracies globally and provided recommendations for governments hoping to protect democracy from the threats of technology, including misinformation and propaganda.  “If you are a country, like the United States, that has pre-existing high levels of polarization, has pre-existing high levels of distrust in institutions and has highly partisan traditional media, you are going to be particularly vulnerable to network propaganda, disinformation [and] hate speech,” Stedman said.  Stedman said the government should define political advertising rather than allow media platforms to create their own definitions. He added that the government should require the digital world to be transparent by making it easier for users to identify bots.  “Even with fact-checking, it’s not clear how effective [this strategy] is,” Stedman said. “Fact-checking doesn’t change the belief of somebody who is an ardent supporter … and if you are an ardent opponent of whoever is putting out the disinformation, you are already predisposed not to believe it.”  Stedman, a professor at Stanford University, said countries with high polarization like the United States were likely to face disinformation.  “We’re in a different age,” Stedman said. “What you can do with social media is much more potent than what you had in the past.” Professor Stephen Stedman (middle), the secretary general of the Kofi Annan Commission, discussed 2020 elections with USC faculty. (Vincent Leo | Daily Trojan) Stedman used Mexico as an example, explaining that its last elections happened alongside the invention of “Verificado,” which allows voters to send in questions with a hashtag to clarify the truth behind messages. “Media gives all people a right to say what they want, but because of this, more people may not know the truth but they still say a lot, so these words may confuse other people,” Zhang said. “There would be false news and true news. People need to figure out which one is true.”last_img read more

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Beat writers split on No. 5 Syracuse’s outcome against No. 7 Army

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ No. 5 Syracuse takes on No. 7 Army in the Carrier Dome this Sunday at 1 p.m. This will be the Orange’s first top-10 test of the season after beating Colgate and Binghamton by a combined score of 38-18. Army already has two top-20 wins this season and shot up to No. 7 in the rankings, but the Black Knights were upset by Marist this past Tuesday in Poughkeepsie, New York. Here’s what our beat writers think will happen at the Dome this Sunday. Mitchell Bannon (2-0)Good KnightSyracuse 16, Army 13Army defeated its first three opponents 51-9. They outshot then-No. 19 UMass, NJIT and then-No. 20 Rutgers by 46. The Orange and Black Knights were headed for a battle of undefeated teams, two of the nation’s top ten and the best teams in New York state. Then, Marist — 5.5-goal underdogs — shocked Army Tuesday afternoon and handed the Knights their first loss of the season. Before their loss to the Red Foxes, the Army game looked like it would give the Orange an opportunity for a resume-building win early in the 2020 season. Now, a win seems mandatory for Syracuse to legitimize themselves as championship weekend contenders. And it must come against a team looking to prove Tuesday’s loss was merely an anomaly.Andrew Crane (2-0)UnarmedArmy 17, Syracuse 14AdvertisementThis is placeholder textMany in the lacrosse world gasped on Tuesday when Army rose six spots to No. 7 and then lost to unranked Marist by eight goals in less than 36 hours. But Marist isn’t half-bad and will likely be ranked next week. Maybe Army isn’t a road team and will drop a second-straight game outside of West Point. Maybe Syracuse is better than I predicted and can crack a defense that held then-No. 18 UMass scoreless in the first half. The Orange won’t, though, and I’ll stand by my prediction on the D.O. Sportscast earlier this week. This is their first test of 2020 — the Black Knights being leaps ahead of Colgate and Binghamton. When SU played the Raiders, 14 goals against caused head coach John Desko to harp about defensive problems. Close defender Nick Mellen’s knee injury was mitigated last week by an awful Bearcat offense, but that continued “week-to-week” absence will start to sting Sunday.Arabdho Majumder (2-0)Falling in lineSyracuse 18, Army 12Marist exposed Army’s flaws this past Tuesday, and Syracuse will likely do the same. A lot of the looks Marist got against the Black Knights were similar to what the Orange got against Colgate in their season opener. Marist’s Jojo Pirreca scored a pair from the left wing in the first quarter on Tuesday. That’s Chase Scanlan’s avocado toast. From watching back the Marist film, I have doubts on Army’s one-on-one defense, and Syracuse has about five options to pick from to exploit that. The worry is defense, especially without Nick Mellen. Army loves sitting a player backside or right in front of the crease to try and feed. The Knights also love to run pick plays. That’s where I see the similarities to Colgate, and SU handled that well, even without Mellen in the second half. This weekend will be the first of multiple top-10 wins Syracuse earns this season. Comments Published on February 22, 2020 at 8:08 amlast_img read more

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Clonmel man wins national rally title

first_imgThe duo, in a Ford Fiesta WRC, came fourth in the Sepam Tipperary Stonethrowers Rally in their Ford Fiesta WRC, which was good enough to earn them the title.Declan Boyle and Brian Boyle – who are cousins from Donegal – took the honours in the Stonethrowers.They finished 34.7 seconds clear of their closest challengers in a Ford Fiesta WRC.last_img

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