Antlerless Deer Hunting Stamps Available

first_imgNova Scotians can begin to apply for the annual antlerless deer hunt starting Friday, July 22. There will be 11,500 permits available again this year. To manage the deer population in Nova Scotia, a zone system is used to set the number of antlerless licences, based on the abundance of deer in various areas. There are 12 deer zones across the province and applicants should review them before applying for the draw. The permits will be awarded by a computerized random draw in seven of the twelve deer management zones. Hunters can also buy a bonus antlerless deer stamp for Zone 102 only. Hunters are allowed to harvest only one deer of either sex in zones 102, 105 and 107 with no antlerless deer permit required. No antlerless deer permits are available in zones 111 and 112. For more information on deer zones check www.gov.ns.ca/natr/draws/deerdraw/ddZones.asp Beginning at 7 a.m., July 22, hunters can apply online using a credit card at www.gov.ns.ca/natr/draws/deerdraw/. A non-refundable application fee of $7.40 plus HST will be charged. People can also call 1-900-565-DEER (3337) 24 hours a day, to apply. The line will remain open until midnight, Sept. 2. It is not possible to call from a cellphone. The draw will take place on Sept. 3 and results will be available online Sept. 5 on the department website. Hunters who do not apply or who are unsuccessful in the draw, will still be eligible to hunt deer where permitted. However, other than zones 102, 105, and 107, where there are no deer restrictions, they will be limited to hunting for bucks with antlers a minimum of 7.62 centimetres (three inches)in length. Information on the 2011 draw can be found where hunting and angling licences are sold, or on the department website.last_img read more

Executive director of MMIWG inquiry stepping down

first_imgAPTN NewsThe controversial executive director of the national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls is stepping down.Sources say the news broke at a staff team-building event in Toronto this week.Debbie Reid was hired in October as the second executive director of the two-year MMIWG inquiry.She came in with a heavy hand under a mandate to clean up an under-performing team and fired several people. More employees resigned in protest.Reid is from Skownan First Nation in Manitoba. She is said to be leaving for personal reasons.Debbie ReidThis brings to 21 the number of employees that have left the federal inquiry as it criss-crosses the country hearing from families and survivors of violence against Indigenous women and girls.Its operation, with a budget of $53.8 million, has been roundly criticized – leading to the resignation of the first executive director and one of five commissioners.So far it has hosted eight public hearings; one is scheduled for Yellowknife later this month.Reid was vocal on Twitter at the start of her tenure, posting about throwing off the chains of government bureaucracy and blasting the work of an APTN reporter as “irresponsible.”She was known for quoting an army general in her emails but recently she dialled back her online presence. She surfaced briefly in Maliotenam, Que., where she contradicted a commissioner on whether the inquiry would host a hearing in Montreal.last_img read more

Hibernia operator fined 80k after pleading guilty in crude oil spill

first_imgST. JOHN’S, N.L. – The company that runs the Hibernia platform off Newfoundland has pleaded guilty after it continued to operate despite a leak in 2013 that spilled about 6,000 litres of crude oil into the North Atlantic.The Hibernia Management and Development Company was fined $80,000 and ordered to pay $170,000 into the federal Environmental Damages Fund.The company “deeply regrets this spill occurred,” spokeswoman Margot Bruce-O’Connell said Friday in an emailed statement. “The Hibernia offshore and onshore workforce is committed to operating in an environmentally responsible manner.“The cause of the incident was due to equipment failure, although the offshore loading system equipment was newly installed in 2012.”Hibernia is located 315 kilometres east of St. John’s and sits in 82 metres of water.Newfoundland and Labrador’s offshore petroleum regulator announced in 2015 it had laid charges in connection with the spill.An agreed statement of facts says about 6,000 litres of crude oil leaked from Hibernia’s offshore loading system starting on Dec. 27, 2013.It describes “a persistent sheen” that the company observed on the surface of the sea close to a valve it didn’t realize was seeping. Instead of shutting down operations, it finished loading a tanker on Dec. 28.The leak was ultimately blamed on “undetected valve failures” — including a “false closure signal” emitted by one particular valve. A supply vessel fully sealed it about five days later on Jan. 1, 2014.Bruce-O’Connell said the company improved its operating, inspection and maintenance procedures after the spill.It was convicted under the Canada-Newfoundland Atlantic Accord Implementation Act.“Operations ceased, but resumed without ensuring that it could be done without causing pollution,” the Canada-Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board said Friday in a statement.The shareholders of the Hibernia Management and Development Company are ExxonMobil Canada (33 per cent), Chevron Canada Resources (27 per cent), Suncor (20 per cent), Canada Hibernia Holding Corporation (8.5 per cent), Murphy Oil (6.5 per cent) and Statoil Canada Ltd. (five per cent).last_img read more

TSX finishes on a flat note as crude prices fall to a

TORONTO — The price of oil plunged to its lowest level in more than 10 months Wednesday, but the weakness wasn’t enough to drag down Canada’s largest stock index.The Toronto Stock Exchange’s S&P/TSX composite index finished the session flat, dipping 1.07 points to 15,148.53, as gains in gold and materials stocks offset losses in energy and bank stocks.The August crude contract lost 98 cents at US$42.53 per barrel, its lowest level since August of 2016.The pullback was tempered somewhat following the release of a weekly report showing that U.S. crude inventories fell 2.5 million barrels last week, which was more than expected.But the long-term pressure on oil, which has declined for three straight sessions, remains, says Kathryn Del Greco, an investment adviser with TD Wealth.“The overriding theme is OPEC and its inability… to cut enough production,” she said.In January, the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries and 10 other oil-producing countries began to decrease production to combat a growing global supply glut and to push the market up. Last week, the two groups agreed to extend the cuts by nine months until next March.While Russia, Saudi Arabia and other nations involved in the deal have met their targeted cuts, an unforeseen increase in U.S. supply has countered these efforts.Del Greco added that other countries such as Nigeria and Libya should also be shouldering the blame for increasing their production while other players have made attempts to slow down.Although many analysts still anticipate that the price for a barrel of crude could get back up to US$60 by the end of the year, Del Greco said some may start revising that to the downside if oil prices continue to free fall.Also on Wednesday, Saudi Arabia, the world’s largest oil producer, announced the appointment of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, a man famous for his combative political and economic policies against fellow OPEC member Iran.Analysts caution that his appointment could bring uncertainty to the future of OPEC’s supply-cutting plan. Currently, Iran is one of three OPEC countries that have not been asked to cut oil production.On the corporate front, Sears Canada’s stock dove 22.5 per cent following a report by Bloomberg that it’s preparing to seek court protection from creditors.The shares (TSX:SCC) lost 18 cents to 62 cents on the TSX.The struggling retailer’s stock has been on a nosedive in the last year, losing more than 80 per cent of its value. And just last week the company warned there was “significant doubt” about its future, saying that it could be sold or restructured.South of the border, the Dow Jones industrial average lost 57.11 points to 21,410.03 and the S&P 500 index was down 1.42 points to 2,435.61. The Nasdaq composite index gained 45.92 points to 6,233.95.In currencies, the Canadian dollar pulled back 0.24 of a U.S. cent to an average price of 75.13 cents US.Elsewhere in commodities, the August gold contract finished ahead by $2.30 to US$1,245.80 an ounce, July copper was up five cents at US$2.60 a pound, and July natural gas gave back a penny at US$2.89 per mmBTU.— With files from The Associated PressFollow @LindaNguyenTO on Twitter. read more

CI Financial to buy Sentry Investments expanding mutual fund offerings

CI Financial to buy Sentry Investments, expanding mutual fund offerings by The Canadian Press Posted Aug 10, 2017 7:15 am MDT Last Updated Aug 10, 2017 at 7:40 am MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email TORONTO – CI Financial Corp. (TSX:CIX) has agreed to buy Sentry Investments Corp. in a friendly deal worth about $780 million, adding to its portfolio of mutual funds.CI’s assets under management will rise by 16 per cent to $140 billion when the deal closes, subject to regulatory approvals.The companies say Sentry will remain a standalone brand, offering more than 45 mutual funds to the Canadian market.CI Financial will pay $230 million of the purchase price in cash and the balance in shares.The deal came as CI reported a second-quarter profit of $96.3 million or 37 cents per share, down from $128.6 million or 47 cents per share a year ago.On an adjusted basis, CI earned $141.3 million or 54 cents per share in its latest quarter, up from $128.6 million or 47 cents per share in the same quarter last year. read more

Ban appoints Senegals Abdoulaye Bathily to head UN regional office in Central

Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has appointed Abdoulaye Bathily of Senegal as the head of the United Nations political office tasked with helping to consolidate peace and prevent conflict in the Central African region. Mr. Bathily, who brings to this position many years of political, diplomatic and academic experience with his national Government, academic institutions and more recently with the UN system, will serve both as the Secretary-General’s Special Representative for Central Africa and the head of the UN regional office, known as UNOCA.He succeeds Abou Moussa of Chad, to whom the Secretary-General is grateful for “his leadership and important accomplishments” during his tenure at UNOCA, UN spokesperson Stéphane Dujarric told reporters in New York.Most recently, Mr. Bathily served as the Secretary-General’s Deputy Special Representative in the UN Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA) since July 2013. Headquartered in Libreville, Gabon, UNOCA has been working since March 2011 to support the efforts of Central African nations to consolidate peace and prevent conflict, as well as to tackle cross-border challenges such as arms trafficking and organized crime.It works closely with the Economic Community of Central African States (ECCAS), which comprises Angola, Burundi, Cameroon, the Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon and Sao Tome and Principe. read more

Young Buckeyes prep for 1st road test

Ohio State played its first four games of the season in the shelter of Ohio Stadium with more than 100,000 cheering fans. This Saturday’s trip to play No. 20 Michigan State, however, will provide the team’s first road test. Some players think an unfriendly atmosphere will pose an obstacle. It’s the first time the Buckeyes have played in East Lansing, Mich., since a 45-7 OSU victory during the 2008 season. OSU is 13-5 all-time in games at Michigan State. Redshirt senior safety Orhian Johnson said the first road game of the year is always “a good test.” “Going up to Michigan State is definitely going to be a little bit tougher with that kind of atmosphere,” Johnson said, “but I think it’s something that we need right now and I think the guys on the team right now are looking forward to it.” Buckeyes first-year coach Urban Meyer said sometimes too much is made of contests away from home. “I think going on the road is sometimes overrated. I think it’s a quality opponent when you go on the road. Going on the road against a team that you’re far superior, that’s not a big deal. Going on the road against this outfit, this is a significant challenge for us,” Meyer said. MSU returns 14 starters from a team that went 11-3 in 2011 and represented the Legends Division in the inaugural Big Ten Championship game, losing 42-39 to Wisconsin. This season MSU is 3-1, and 2-1 at home, with its only loss coming to then-No. 20 Notre Dame. Their defense returns nine starters and has allowed 233.5 yards per game in the 2012 season, good enough for sixth in the country. The Spartans’ offense relies on the legs of junior running back Le`Veon Bell, who has rushed for more than 200 yards in a game twice this season. OSU co-defensive coordinator and safeties coach Everett Withers made it clear that the key to preparing for a road game is to stay in the same routine as any other week. “I think the first thing you do, you have to understand that your practice should not change. Work on your practice schedule just like you normally do,” Withers said. “You prepare like you are going to prepare here, your practice days – Tuesday through Thursday – you go get on a plane and you go fly, you get in the hotel just like you’re going to get over in the Blackwell and you do the same thing on Friday night and you get up and go play a game.” When OSU visits Spartan Stadium, it will be in a venue and atmosphere only two players, redshirt seniors defensive lineman Nathan Williams and linebacker Etienne Sabino, have experienced. “It’s going to be exciting. Away games are always fun,” Sabino said. “It’s going to be a hostile crowd. Michigan State is a good team and we’re a good team.” That inexperience of playing at MSU might be amplified with the amount of freshmen on the Buckeyes’ depth chart. There are nine true freshmen and five redshirt freshmen listed in OSU’s two-deep. “We’re playing more freshmen than any school in America. And sometimes it looks awful at times, but it’s our job to coach them through that and get them to be sophomores real fast,” Meyer said. Senior fullback Zach Boren said this is a time where the veteran players have to support the younger Buckeyes. “It’s a lot different playing away from home, especially in a hostile environment like Michigan State. I think that’s where leadership takes over and that’s where some of us older guys have to really step in and be really be more hands-on with them because you only have 70 guys on away trips, you aren’t 105 strong,” he said. “So it’s one of those things where we just have to make sure those guys are ready and we have a good week at practice and those guys are mentally ready for the game.” Redshirt junior center Corey Linsley agreed. “We’re just going to mentor them through it. It’s a different mentality going into away games. It’s definitely going to be a great time for the young guys to learn how to prepare to go to an away game,” Linsley said. “It’s more traveling, it’s less meeting time and there’s more to handle.” The Buckeyes are scheduled to take their first road trip to East Lansing, Mich., and open Big Ten play Saturday at 3:30 p.m.

Balanced Ohio State downs Campbell 9164

Freshman guard D’Angelo Russell (0) goes for a layup during a game against Campbell on Nov. 26 at the Schottenstein Center. OSU won, 91-64.Credit: Ed Momot / For The LanternFor five minutes, the Campbell Camels kept it close.But five minutes later, the No. 16 Ohio State men’s basketball team held a 20-10 lead after going on an 11-2 run.The Buckeyes (4-0) held a 45-22 lead at halftime, but only outscored Campbell (1-3) 46-42 in the second half on their way to a 91-64 win Wednesday night at the Schottenstein Center.Sophomore forward Marc Loving said there were portions of the game — particularly in the second half — when the Buckeyes were lacking in energy.“We relaxed at times,” Loving said after the game. “Spurts in the game we needed to regroup and we didn’t. Definitely take care of that in practice.”Coach Thad Matta said OSU didn’t have “a lot of energy” or “juice” in the second half, and he didn’t see the same pace he had hoped for after a fast start to the game.“I told ‘em at halftime, ‘the biggest thing I’m looking for in the second half is claiming rebounds and running in transition,’” Matta said. “And we get it a couple times, but it was never the consistent push that we wanted.”OSU struggled with rebounding on the defensive side of the floor at times, leading to 13 offensive rebounds for the Camels, compared to just 13 for the Buckeyes.Two early 3-pointers helped the Camels keep it at 9-8 five minutes into the game, but OSU’s balanced attack helped the Buckeyes take a double-digit lead at the 11:01 mark in the first half that they never relinquished for the final 45 minutes of action.As a team, OSU shot 60.7 percent from the field and 40 percent from 3-point land in the game.Matta said he’s been “pleasantly surprised” by how well the Buckeyes have shot this season, but added that won’t necessarily be a given week in and week out.“You’re hoping that’s something that you can bank on, and we joked about it the other night, I don’t know how much longer you can keep shooting at this clip,” he said. “But I do think guys are taking more pride in their shots and seeing the ball go through the basket.”The second half started much like the first as Campbell opened the period on a 10-5 run. But the Buckeyes responded to take a 73-46 lead with 9:03 to play in the game.Starting with a 53-32 lead at the 16:43 mark in the half, OSU led by at least 20 for the rest of the game.Despite scoring one more point in the second half than his team did in the first, Matta said he wanted to see more push from the Buckeyes.“You still score 91 points, but I didn’t think we played as fast as we wanted to,” he said.All 10 OSU players to take the court scored, while all five Buckeye starters scored in double figures. The Buckeyes have scored at least 90 points in three of four games this season.OSU shot 60 percent from the field in the opening 20 minutes while limiting Campbell to a 29.2 shooting percentage and just three 2-point field goals at the break. All five Buckeye starters scored at least six points in the first half, with freshman guard D’Angelo Russell leading the way with 12 points and sophomore forward Marc Loving adding 10.Russell said the Buckeyes were more focused on playing their own game than paying attention to Campbell heading into the contest.Sophomore forward Marc Loving (2) passes the ball during a game against Campbell on Nov. 26 at the Schottenstein Center. OSU won, 91-64.Credit: Ed Momot / For The Lantern“We’re really not worrying about our opponent, we’re worrying about our team and we’re trying to get better as a team the best way we can,” he said.Senior guard Shannon Scott — who set a program record with 16 assists in a win against Sacred Heart on Sunday — had four of OSU’s eight assists before halftime.Freshman guard D’Angelo Russell led all players with 22 points while sophomore forward Marc Loving had 18. Russell also led all players with seven assists and shot four of six from 3-point range.After tallying his career-best scoring output, Loving said he wasn’t any more comfortable against the Camels than he was in the first three games of the year.“I wouldn’t say I get more and more comfortable each game,” he said. “I’ve been pretty comfortable this season.”Campbell redshirt-senior guard Andrew Ryan poured in 17 points on five-of-eight shooting from three to lead the Camels.The Buckeyes are scheduled to return to the court on Friday to take on James Madison at the Schottenstein Center. Tip is set for 4:00 p.m.With two games in three days, Matta said the Buckeyes are set to practice in the afternoon on Thanksgiving to prepare for Friday, and he said he’s hoping the team keeps its energy during the holiday.“I told these guys, there’s two types of teams over break, we’re on break right now,” he said. “There’s teams that play really, really well because they don’t have a lot to do and then there’s teams that kind of become lethargic, and I know which team I want us to be.” read more

Cancer Research toned down obesity campaign after fatshaming backlash

first_imgIn a pilot scheme launched in London and the West Midlands last year, the charity posted advertisements on billboards stating “obesity causes cancer”. Cancer Research UK (CRUK) has said it toned down a major campaign warning of the dangers of obesity to avoid scaring overweight people, but has hit back at critics accusing the organisation of “fat-shaming”. However, this was altered to “obesity is a cause of cancer” for the campaign proper this year.center_img Last night Professor Linda Bauld, who leads the CRUK’s prevention efforts, said the barrage of criticism levelled at the the charity had not influenced the change, but that the alteration took place to make it “absolutely clear that not everyone who…last_img read more

Heres What Happened Today Sunday

first_img Feb 5th 2017, 8:02 PM Short URL Sunday 5 Feb 2017, 8:02 PM Here’s What Happened Today: Sunday The Citizens’ Assembly, concerns over transplant patients and Trump’s travel ban all had people talking today. http://jrnl.ie/3224253 9,703 Views Share2 Tweet Email No Comments NEED TO CATCH up? TheJournal.ie brings you a round-up of today’s news.IRELAND Issy O’Reilly, age 11 from Dublin, pictured at the Classic and Vintage Cars Auction held in Merlin Car Auctions, Co. Kildare. Source: ROBBIE REYNOLDS PHOTOGRAPHYA TD called on the HSE to immediately clarify what contingency measures are in place for transporting transplant patients.The chair of the Citizens’ Assembly reaffirmed its commitment to balance while discussing the Eighth Amendment of the Constitution following criticism from the anti-abortion side of the debate.Ian Bailey was indicted in France for the murder of Sophie Toscan du Plantier.Junior Minister Sean Canney said he would be swapping the role with his close ally Kevin ‘Boxer’ Moran between now and August.WORLD Far-right leader presidential candidate Marine Le Pen gestures as she speaks during a conference in Lyon, France. Source: AP Photo/Michel Eule#UNITED STATES: A US court denied the Justice Department’s request for an immediate reinstatement of Donald Trump’s travel ban.#AFGHANISTAN: Over 100 people have died after series of avalanches in Afghanistan.#TURKEY: Police detained over 400 suspected members of the Islamic State.PARTING SHOTIn case you haven’t seen it – here’s the SNL sketch that has everyone talking: Source: Saturday Night Live/YouTube Get our daily news round up: By Cormac Fitzgerald Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this articlelast_img read more

Internet Gutter Real Super Powers

first_imgOnline is a strange and terrifying place. It’s enabled us to connect with one another, advance the causes of science and culture, and unite the world with a glowing net of data. It’s also enabled people with very… particular interests to find each other. In this weekly series, we’ll be dipping into the Internet Gutter – the strange subcultures and weird worlds lurking in the dark pockets of the World Wide Web.Real SuperpowersEverywhere you look, it seems, there are superheroes. Not just in comic books, their ancestral home, but in movies, TV shows, video games, et cetera. They’ve become the dominant modern myth of the 21st century. And there’s nothing a myth likes more than crossing over into reality.We all want to be something more than we are. We want it so bad that, in extreme cases, we manage to tell ourselves that we’re actually doing it. Welcome to the world of Real Superpowers, an Internet forum populated by men and women who are completely convinced that they’re mutants with abilities beyond the norm.There are certainly real people in this world who have pushed their body beyond normal human limits. Wim Hof, the dude who invented a breathing technique that lets him survive extreme cold. Veronica Seider, the German dentist with such acute eyesight she could identify people from a mile away. The people on this website, though? I’ll let you make up your own mind.Great GiftsThe site’s How To Get Super Powers page is a good place to start. Here are a few paragraphs in their own words.Maybe you just haven’t found your power yet. Maybe every one has a power or possibly even powers that they are born with, and can only be unlocked during puberty when the body undergoes immense changes, or during life or death situations, when the bodies natural fight or flight responces activate. Now let’s assume that none of that is true. Then perhaps with advanced technology, you could manipulate your genetic code, and gain powers that way.You could also manipulate your physical body using technology. Maybe you replace some parts with robotic counterparts that are far more powerful, like stronger arms and legs, or a heart that can pump enough blood to make you run faster and longer than everyone else.Nanotechnology could be used to tweak existing muscles and tissues. You could rework all your muscle fibers and bones, making them far denser and more powerful than normal, giving you super strength.Technology could also theoretically be used to alter your mental capacities, increasing your intelligence, and perhaps giving you telepathic, precognitive, or telekinetic abilities.Intensely stressful situations, like combat in a war, could as well trigger a change in you whereby you suddenly gain control over your five senses, and can see, smell, touch, taste, and hear with far more clarity, accuracy, and detail than before. And now some possibilities with out assuming everyone has them, or that technology could give us powers. You may have noticed that the words “could” and “perhaps” appear with disproportionate frequency in those paragraphs. That’s because none of these methods have actually been proven to work in the world we live in. That’s not stopping the Real Super Powers folks, though.The real fun here, though, is on the forums. That’s where site users who are convinced they’ve already transcended humanity gather to share their stories. Let’s start diving in.Behind The MaskWe’ll start in the “Personal Experiences” section. The posters here are convinced that they’ve already manifested extranormal activities and just need some help in controlling or understanding them. That help typically isn’t forthcoming.Probably the most popular power to claim to have is the ability to predict the future. Post after post features wanna-be psychics claiming to have predicted everything from political assassinations to fast food value meals. On reading, they seem like little more than simple coincidence, but for the believer, there are all sorts of meaning to be had.No, we don’t think this has happened to anyone else. Posts on the site are divided about 50/50 between “a weird but basically normal thing is happening to me, do I have super powers” and “I’m in life or death combat with aliens/demons / CIA agents that only I can see.” There’s very little middle ground to be had.Secret OriginsAnother active forum on the site is the “Developing Super Powers” section, which is where people who haven’t come into their abilities discuss ways to make them happen. These posts are full of yearning, as multiple users are convinced that they’re just an inch or two away from unlocking their true potential.For every person who needs help, there’s a corresponding poster who is offering their own secret techniques. And for every one of those, there’s someone else claiming that they’re lying. What initially seems like a support group for wanna-be mutants is actually a bitchy, backbiting circle of angry people calling each other frauds and rip-offs.Sadly, that’s kind of the level that Real Super Powers winds up at. Nobody ever gets powerful enough to fight crime, so they just sit around and argue about the best way to do it. Or at least they did…Crisis On Our EarthPerhaps the most mystifying thing about Real Super Powers is that the site has essentially been abandoned. Almost all the posts we’ve shared with you date from over five years ago – everything more recent on the site is spam. Where did all of the brave explorers into the realms of the superhuman go? Did they know too much? Were they abducted by the Obama administration and put into one of those FEMA camps we’ve heard so much about? Are they out there, fighting crime in the shadows with their abilities? Or did they meet and destroy each other in a grand battle?The world may never know.last_img read more

This year’s Ride Around Clark County pushed out to summer

first_imgThe Ride Around Clark County, a community cycling event sponsored annually since 1983 by the Vancouver Bicycle Club, will be different this year. The traditional first Saturday in May is history. The new date is the third Saturday in August. This year, that’s Aug. 18.That means ambitious cyclists will have more time to train and less worry about rain. The risk of a summer scorcher is less than that of a spring downpour, according to Devin Bowen, president of the Bicycle Club.“May isn’t the best time to have a big outdoor event,” he said. “The RACC should be something people can ride in the sunshine. That’s been a big struggle for us. Ridership can vary pretty dramatically as people wait to see what the weather will be.”The early May timing has always rendered the RACC “a training ride for other summer rides, and that’s OK, but I’d rather view it as a ride you train for,” Bowen said. “It’s a great event and we want to make it as good as possible.”The event’s base has changed, too. Cyclists will launch from Pearson Air Museum, not Clark College, and when they return they’ll enjoy a big celebration: barbecue lunch, smoothies, beer garden and live music until 4 p.m.last_img read more

Rangers sign Umar

first_imgRangers have announced the completion of the signing of Sadiq Umar on loan.The Scottish club announced the signing of Sadiq Umar from AS Roma on a one-year loan deal, subject to international clearance.The Nigerian striker made six appearances for Roma scoring two goals in the process since his move from Italian Serie B side Spezia in 2015.Sadiq has spent the major part of his career with Roma away from the club with loan spells at NAC Breda, Torino and Bologna.“I wanted to stay in Rome this season but when Steven Gerrard called me I couldn’t say no to him,” Sadiq told Rangers TV via Sports Mole.Rangers is still behind Celtic: John Hartson Manuel R. Medina – September 3, 2019 According to the former Celtic player, there’s still a massive gap between his ex-club and Rangers in the Scottish Premier League.“He spoke to me about the club, the players and staff, and how much he wanted me to be a part of it all.”“He spoke about helping me progress in my career and when someone pays a keen eye to your career in that manner you can’t say no.”Sadiq was dropped from Roma’s 30 man preseason squad earlier on Monday.The 21-year-old striker was part of the Nigerian side that won bronze at the 2016 Olympics in Rio.last_img read more

Chievo have potential DAnna

first_imgThe Chievo coach believes the team can beat Udinese today and climb some spots in the Italian Lega Serie A standingsChievo Verona is dead-last in the Italian Lega Serie A standings.The team has only been able to draw twice and has two defeats.But after it was punished by false accounting, the team lost three points and sits at the bottom with negative one point.Chievo coach Lorenzo D’Anna has come out before his team hosts Udinese, to speak what he expects of his club.Juventus and Bayern Munich chasing Ibrahim Karamoko Taimoor Khan – June 26, 2019 Ibrahim Karamoko is getting a lot of attention from the likes of Juventus and Bayern Munich following some excellent displays for Chievo Verona.Aged just…“The draw with Roma has allowed us to work with enthusiasm and self-belief,” he said according to Football Italia.“This team can go beyond what it has shown so far, as we have the potential, quality, and character to go far. We just need to prove it on the field.”“We want to cancel out the ‘minus’ from our standings and will do everything to re-emerge within the points. This side has always reacted well to setbacks, we are growing and want to consolidate our performances on a team level, not just as individuals,” he added.“In order to achieve that, we need confidence and courage.”“Although they have a Spanish Coach, Udinese have very little Spanish about their style of football. In fact, they’re very old-fashioned in an Italian way, sitting back and waiting to hit us with pace on the counter,” he concluded.last_img read more

Toyota Supra gets four years of Apple CarPlay free but then what

first_img 3 Auto Tech Sports Cars Comments 52 Photos More From Roadshow Toyota Enlarge ImageThe 2020 Supra shares a lot of BMW DNA — some of it is desirable, some of it might not be. Toyota It’s widely known — and the point of some contention — that the new 2020 Toyota Supra has loads of BMW in its genetic makeup. Toyota’s partnership with the German automaker to develop its new Supra alongside BMW’s Z4 Roadster helped make the economies of scale feasible to offer these smaller-volume sports cars. However, that agreement also may have had some unforeseen consequences. Among them? The 2020 Supra looks like it may become the only Toyota to charge owners for ongoing access to Apple CarPlay.Among many other interior bits, the new Supra employs a thinly reskinned version of BMW’s iDrive infotainment system, and recently, the Bavarians became the first automaker to start charging a yearly subscription fee for Apple CarPlay integration, a move that upset many brand enthusiasts, car shoppers and yes, automotive journalists. By inheriting BMW’s infotainment, Toyota may have unwittingly introduced this pay-as-you-go phone-pairing technology to their own new sports car. 2020 Toyota Corolla Hybrid review: Sip with subtlety 2019 Rolls-Royce Cullinan review: The top-shelf SUV 2020 Toyota Supra is a divisive devil in red 2020 Toyota Supra review: A solid sports car that’s rife with controversy Tags Toyota Share your voice Back in May, when he drove the 2020 Supra at its US launch, our man Tim Stevens enquired about this issue, and at the time, Toyota officials weren’t sure how they were going to handle it. According to a report from Motor1.com, the solution — for now —  appears to be four years of complementary CarPlay access. However, that may not be the end of the story — it appears that Toyota may not have figured out what happens after that four-year period expires. What comes next? “We haven’t decided yet,” is the answer Motor1 was given by Toyota’s Jarrod Marini, Customer Care Senior Analyst (Connected Technologies).  While most newly developed Toyota models come with free Apple CarPlay integrated into even base infotainment systems, if you want this convenient technology on the Supra, the base $49,990 (plus $930 delivery) model won’t cut it. You’ll have to step up to a Premium ($53,990) or Launch Edition ($55,250) trim in order to get the upgraded Supra Command system featuring an 8.8-inch screen — the base 6.5-inch unit does without the phone-mirroring functionality. 2020 Toyota Supra - interiorEnlarge ImageIf that infotainment system looks a lot like BMW’s iDrive, that’s because it is. Tim Stevens, Roadshow Toyota’s four-year initial free period is at least substantially more generous than BMW, which previously charged a one-time option fee for the technology and now gives a one-year complimentary period followed by an $80 annual subscription fee on some of its models. One other potentially unanticipated consequence of going with BMW’s pay-to-CarPlay subscription model? The Supra’s system may be vulnerable to outages. Back in May, an issue with BMW’s ConnectedDrive telematics services caused Apple CarPlay compatibility to temporarily disappear in select BMW vehicles. According to BMW officials, a server migration issue was to blame for the brief problem. Roadshow has reached out to Toyota for clarification and will update this story if more information becomes available.Like today’s BMW range, the Supra does not offer Android Auto. Toyota has begun introducing Google’s equivalent smartphone-mirroring tech on select 2020 model-year vehicles in the US and Canada, including its 4Runner, Sequoia, Tacoma and Tundra trucks and SUVs.last_img read more

This Cool Cycling Mask Can Block Air Pollution Particles

first_imgStay on target Biking, cycling, or jogging in an urban area could expose you to toxic air pollution. Breathing in fumes might lead to serious health problems, however, R-Pur, a French company, aims to protect commuters’ lungs with a new accessory: an anti-pollution mask that blocks toxic particles.The R-Pur Nano mask, which is made in France, is designed for bikers, cyclists, and runners. It can filter toxic particles, including automobile exhaust, diesel, bacteria, and viruses, so you can breathe in clean air whenever you’re traveling around cities. If you’re interested in buying it, you’ll have to wait: The mask, which costs $149, is already sold out on R-Pur’s Indigogo page.AT CES 2019, R-Pur revealed a prototype with a cool update: Lights on the side of the prototype mask can change and alert you about the surrounding air quality. You’ll know if there’s dirty air present, since the mask connects to an app that measures the life of the mask’s filter. This app also gives details on global pollution data, so you’ll never be left in the dark when it comes to air quality.For more information on this the R-Pur Nano mask, you can visit R-Pur’s Indigogo page. According to the page, R-Pur already shipped its first R-Pur Nano masks in December, however, no other updates have been provided yet.More on Geek.com:Eye-Popping LG ‘OLED Falls’ Display Wows at CES 2019IKEA’s Smart Blinds for Dumb Windows Are Coming Soon, And CheapThese Robot Delivery Dogs Bring Packages Right to Your Door 2019 Tech Trends Worth Getting Hyped AboutYou Can Finally Buy A Terabyte SD Card Thanks to Lexar last_img read more

This is the white supremacist group determined to murder LGBTI people

first_imgSam Woodward, the member of Atomwaffen Division who killed gay Jewish teen Blaze Bernstein ‘The group may have as many as 20 cells around the country, small groups of indeterminate size in Texas, Virginia, Washington, Nevada and elsewhere. Members armed with assault rifles and other guns have taken part in weapons training in various locations over the last two years, including last month in the Nevada desert near Death Valley.’‘Members have discussed using explosives to cripple public water systems and destroy parts of the electrical power grid. One member even claimed to have obtained classified maps of the power grid in California.’‘Throughout the chats, Atomwaffen members laud Timothy McVeigh, the former soldier who bombed the Alfred P. Murrah federal building in Oklahoma City in 1995, killing 168, including numerous children. Charleston church shooter Dylann Roof and Anders Breivik, the Norwegian extremist who massacred 77 people, also come in for praise.’The murder of Blaze BernsteinWoodward posted several messages to the chat the day after Bernstein’s murder, before he was arrested and charged. He told the group he was ‘truly grateful’ for their time together.‘Sam did something stupid. Not that the f*ggot k*ke didn’t deserve to die. Just simply not worth a life in prison for,’ one member wrote, using an anti-Semitic slur.Woodward pleaded not guilty to the murder of Bernstein. Law enforcement is looking into what role Atomwaffen Division played in the murder.Organizations that monitor hate groups, such as Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), consider Atomwaffen Division a legitimate threat.‘We haven’t seen anything like Atomwaffen in quite a while,’ Keegan Hankes of SPLC told ProPublica. ‘They should be taken seriously because they’re so extreme.’Learn more about Atomwaffen Division and ProPublica’s investigation in the video below:[embedded content]Got a news tip? Want to share your story? Email us . Atomwaffen Division is a notorious white supremacist group that celebrates Hitler and Charles Manson. The murder of Bernstein was celebrated in these chats, of which ProPublica attained 250,000 messages from. The chats were from Discord, an online chat service targeted at the gaming community.The chats‘I love this,’ one member wrote upon hearing the news about Bernstein.Another member described Woodward as a ‘one man gay Jew wrecking crew.’‘What I really want to know is who leaked that shit about Sam to the media,’ a third member wrote.At least one member wanted revenge on the person who revealed Woodward’s affiliation with the group.‘Rats and traitors get the rope first,’ they said.The group ‘Atomwaffen,’ which means ‘nuclear weapons’ in German, embraces ideologies from the Third Reich and often preaches hatred of minorities. They produce YouTube videos of their members firing weapons, burning the U.S. Constitution, and setting fire to the American flag. For the most part, their operation is cloaked in secrecy. They prohibit their members from talking to the media.ProPublica reports that: eTN Chatroom for Readers (join us) Blaze Bernstein murder was a gay hate crime, say prosecutorsMan charged with Blaze Bernstein murder to stand trial for hate crimeMan ‘nearly died’ and lost an ear in violent homophobic attackRead the full article on Gaystarnews:  :https://www.gaystarnews.com/article/white-supremacist-group-determined-murder-lgbti-people/center_img Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… Last month, the murder of gay Jewish teen Blaze Bernstein at the hand of neo-Nazi Samuel Woodward made headlines. Investigative journalism non-profit ProPublica recently attained encrypted chat logs from Woodward’s extremist group, Atomwaffen Division. GAYSTARNEWS-last_img read more

Origin of the New Years kissOrigin of the New Years kiss

first_imgWebsiteWebsiteWebsite WebsiteWebsiteWebsite WebsiteWebsiteWebsite Tradition and superstition aside, don’t waste your New Year’s kiss. It is one of our most life-affirming pleasures and only comes around so many times. Tonight, use it as an excuse to grab hold of someone you love, someone you’ve had a crush on for ages, or someone who is standing by the drinks table with nice lips.Throw some confetti in the air, grab them round the waist, lean them back and kiss them with everything you’ve got.Click to receive news links via WhatsApp. Or  for the latest news, visit our webpage or follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Join us there! Where did the tradition of kissing on New Year’s come from? Historians date this practice back to the Ancient Romans who would throw a big party every New Year’s Eve called the Festival of Saturnalia, where they would kiss and generally debauch one another as much as possible.Later on, the English and Germans would celebrate by kissing the first person they met when the bells rang twelve o’clock. Europeans have also traditionally held masked balls on New Year’s Eve for hundreds of years. In these traditions, the mask symbolises evil spirits from the old year and the kiss (after removing the mask) is an act of purification.There is also a superstitious element to it… Supposedly kissing those closest to you at the stroke of midnight will strengthen the bonds of your relationship in the year to come.last_img read more

VIDEO AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings

first_img Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Find more SCCT news and videos CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Technology Reports View all 9 items Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Conference Coverage View all 396 items Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Find more SCCT news and videos Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 6:03Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -6:03 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging — Interview with Sudhen Desai, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Recent Videos View all 606 items Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference.center_img AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Find more news and videos from AAPM. Videos | Artificial Intelligence | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Women’s Health View all 62 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Nina Kottler, M.D., vice president of clinical operations, Radiology Partners, explains how the company developed its own artificial intelligence (AI) application to check the accuracy of radiologists’ reports as they dictated and to follow-up automatically on incidental findings. She spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference.She said the AI sits on top of Radiology Partners’ natural language processing application and will immediately flag any comments that do not appear to make sense or might need clarification. Instead of forcing radiologists to change their workflow to create structured reports, Kottler said this AI software helps adapt the existing workflow to make the reports more consistent and able to be data mined later.  Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Find more SCCT news and videos Information Technology View all 220 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Find more SCCT news and videos Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Related content: Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicinelast_img read more